You are Here

Art After the Internet
Author: Omar Kholeif
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780956957177
Category: Art
Page: 253
View: 9513

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'You Are Here is the best anything I've read in ages ...and I'm jealous I'm not a contributor. I really loved it. It's a joy to see new green shoots of cultural tendencies emerging from barren soil.' - Douglas Coupland, Artist and Author, Generation XYou Are Here: Art After the Internet is the first major publication to critically explore both the effects and affects that the Internet has had on contemporary artistic practices.Responding to an era that has increasingly chosen to dub itself as 'post-internet', this collective text traces a potted narrative exploring the relationship of the Internet to art practices from the early millennium to the present day.The book positions itself as a provocation on the current state of cultural production, relying on first-person accounts from artists, writers and curators as the primary source material.The book raises urgent questions about how we negotiate the formal, aesthetic and conceptual relationship of art and its effects after the ubiquitous rise of the Internet.Published by Cornerhouse and SPACE.'Curator and editor Omar Kholief's recent book of essays and projects from artists has perfectly captured how artists have engaged with the context of the internet. Demonstrating how far things have come from ravers in their bedroom making DIY music on their desktops.' - Francesca Gavin, Visual Arts Editor, Dazed and Confused'A book of ideas to tear through hungrily and re-read slow.' - Kate Taylor, Programmer, BFI London Film FestivalRead the superb aqnb.com review of the book here...

I Was Raised on the Internet


Author: Omar Kholeif
Publisher: Prestel Publishing
ISBN: 9783791358024
Category: ART
Page: 184
View: 3523

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"A speculative reader about contemporary artists engaging with digital technology. Includes essays by Michael Connor, James Bridle, Cadence Kinsey, Nina Wexelblatt, and Orit Gat and short provocations by DIS, Olia Lialina, Joanne McNeil, Monira Al Qadiri, Trevor Paglen, Simon Denny, Jeremy Bailey, Heather Phillipson, Martine Syms, Jon Thomson and Alison Craighead, Jared Quinton, Zach Blas, and Aria Dean"--

Art in the Age of the Internet, 1989 to Today


Author: Eva Respini
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300228252
Category: Art
Page: 316
View: 3654

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A richly illustrated and expansive investigation of how the internet has influenced contemporary artistic practice over the past thirty years Featuring essays by leading curators, scholars, and critics, this book provides an in-depth look at how the internet has impacted visual art over the past three decades. From the fall of the Berlin Wall to Black Lives Matter, the internet's promise to foster communication across borders and democratize information has evolved alongside its rapidly developing technologies. While it has introduced radical changes to how art is made, disseminated, and perceived, the internet has also inspired artists to create inventive and powerful work that addresses new conceptions of community and identity, modes of surveillance, and tactics for resistance. Art in the Age of the Internet, 1989 to Today traces the relationship between internet culture and artistic practice through the work of contemporary artists such as Ed Atkins, Camille Henrot, and Anicka Yi, and looks back to pre-internet pioneers including Nam June Paik. Conversations between artists reveal how they have tackled similar issues using different technological tools. Touching on a variety of topics that range from emergent ideas of the body and human enhancement to the effects of digital modes of production on traditional media, and featuring more than 200 images of works including painting, performance, photography, sculpture, video, and web-based projects, this volume is packed with insightful revelations about how the internet has affected the trajectory of contemporary art.

Electronic Superhighway


Author: Omar Kholeif,Séamus McCormack,Emily Butler
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780854882465
Category:
Page: 270
View: 5087

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Accompanying a landmark exhibition at the Whitechapel Gallery, this catalogue explores the impact of computer and networked technologies on artists from the mid-1960s to the present day.

Mass Effect

Art and the Internet in the Twenty-First Century
Author: Lauren Cornell,Ed Halter
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262330687
Category: Art
Page: 528
View: 5909

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Since the turn of the millennium, the Internet has evolved from what was merely a new medium to a true mass medium -- with a deeper and wider cultural reach, greater opportunities for distribution and collaboration, and more complex corporate and political realities. Mapping a loosely chronological series of formative arguments, developments, and happenings, Mass Effect provides an essential guide to understanding the dynamic and ongoing relationship between art and new technologies.Mass Effect brings together nearly forty contributions, including newly commissioned essays and reprints, image portfolios, and transcribed discussion panels and lectures that offer insights and reflections from a wide range of artists, curators, art historians, and bloggers. Among the topics examined are the use of commercial platforms for art practice, what art means in an age of increasing surveillance, and questions surrounding such recent concepts as "postinternet." Other contributions analyze and document particular works by the artists of And/Or Gallery, Cory Arcangel, DIS, Cao Fei, the Radical Software Group, and others. Mass Effect relaunches a publication series initiated by the MIT Press and the New Museum in 1984, which produced six defining volumes for the field of contemporary art. These new volumes will build on this historic partnership and reinvigorate the conversation around contemporary culture once again.Copublished with the New Museum of Contemporary Art, New YorkImportant Notice: The digital edition of this book is missing some of the images found in the physical edition.ContributorsCory Arcangel, Karen Archey, Michael Bell-Smith, Claire Bishop, Dora Budor, Johanna Burton, Paul Chan, Ian Cheng, Michael Connor, Lauren Cornell, Petra Cortright, Jesse Darling, Anne de Vries, DIS, Aleksandra Domanovic, Harm van den Dorpel, Dragan Espenschied, Rózsa Zita Farkas, Azin Feizabadi, Alexander R. Galloway, Boris Groys, Ed Halter, Alice Ming Wai Jim, Jogging, Caitlin Jones, David Joselit, Dina Kafafi, John Kelsey, Alex Kitnick, Tina Kukielski, Oliver Laric, Mark Leckey, David Levine, Olia Lialina, Guthrie Lonergan, Jordan Lord, Jens Maier-Rothe, Shawn Maximo, Jennifer McCoy, Kevin McCoy, Gene McHugh, Tom Moody, Ceci Moss, Katja Novitskova, Marisa Olson, Trevor Paglen, Seth Price, Alexander Provan, Morgan Quaintance, Domenico Quaranta, Raqs Media Collective, Alix Rule, Timur Si-Qin, Josephine Berry Slater, Paul Slocum, Rebecca Solnit, Wolfgang Staehle, Hito Steyerl, Martine Syms, Ben Vickers, Michael Wang, Tim Whidden, Anicka Yi, and Damon Zucconi

The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains


Author: Nicholas Carr
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393079364
Category: Science
Page: 256
View: 323

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Finalist for the 2011 Pulitzer Prize in General Nonfiction: “Nicholas Carr has written a Silent Spring for the literary mind.”—Michael Agger, Slate “Is Google making us stupid?” When Nicholas Carr posed that question, in a celebrated Atlantic Monthly cover story, he tapped into a well of anxiety about how the Internet is changing us. He also crystallized one of the most important debates of our time: As we enjoy the Net’s bounties, are we sacrificing our ability to read and think deeply? Now, Carr expands his argument into the most compelling exploration of the Internet’s intellectual and cultural consequences yet published. As he describes how human thought has been shaped through the centuries by “tools of the mind”—from the alphabet to maps, to the printing press, the clock, and the computer—Carr interweaves a fascinating account of recent discoveries in neuroscience by such pioneers as Michael Merzenich and Eric Kandel. Our brains, the historical and scientific evidence reveals, change in response to our experiences. The technologies we use to find, store, and share information can literally reroute our neural pathways. Building on the insights of thinkers from Plato to McLuhan, Carr makes a convincing case that every information technology carries an intellectual ethic—a set of assumptions about the nature of knowledge and intelligence. He explains how the printed book served to focus our attention, promoting deep and creative thought. In stark contrast, the Internet encourages the rapid, distracted sampling of small bits of information from many sources. Its ethic is that of the industrialist, an ethic of speed and efficiency, of optimized production and consumption—and now the Net is remaking us in its own image. We are becoming ever more adept at scanning and skimming, but what we are losing is our capacity for concentration, contemplation, and reflection. Part intellectual history, part popular science, and part cultural criticism, The Shallows sparkles with memorable vignettes—Friedrich Nietzsche wrestling with a typewriter, Sigmund Freud dissecting the brains of sea creatures, Nathaniel Hawthorne contemplating the thunderous approach of a steam locomotive—even as it plumbs profound questions about the state of our modern psyche. This is a book that will forever alter the way we think about media and our minds.

The Artists Who Will Change the World


Author: Omar Kholeif,Douglas Coupland
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780500519967
Category:
Page: 192
View: 7329

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This cutting-edge book is the essential guide to what's next in contemporary art, and to the visionaries who are making it happen.

You Are Not a Gadget


Author: Jaron Lanier
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307593142
Category: Technology & Engineering
Page: 240
View: 4107

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A NATIONAL BESTSELLER A programmer, musician, and father of virtual reality technology, Jaron Lanier was a pioneer in digital media, and among the first to predict the revolutionary changes it would bring to our commerce and culture. Now, with the Web influencing virtually every aspect of our lives, he offers this provocative critique of how digital design is shaping society, for better and for worse. Informed by Lanier’s experience and expertise as a computer scientist, You Are Not a Gadget discusses the technical and cultural problems that have unwittingly risen from programming choices—such as the nature of user identity—that were “locked-in” at the birth of digital media and considers what a future based on current design philosophies will bring. With the proliferation of social networks, cloud-based data storage systems, and Web 2.0 designs that elevate the “wisdom” of mobs and computer algorithms over the intelligence and wisdom of individuals, his message has never been more urgent. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Art and the Internet


Author: Joanne McNeil,Phoebe Stubbs
Publisher: Black Dog Pub Limited
ISBN: 9781907317989
Category: Art
Page: 223
View: 6241

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This long-awaited visual survey of art and the Internet over the last two and a half decades explores the legacy of the Internet on art and reveals how artists and institutions are using it and why. Original, 3,000 first printing.

At a Distance

Precursors to Art and Activism on the Internet
Author: Annmarie Chandler,Norie Neumark
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 9780262033282
Category: Art
Page: 486
View: 7557

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The theory and practice of networked art and activism, including mail art, sound art, telematic art, fax art, Fluxus, and assemblings.

The Internet Is Not the Answer


Author: Andrew Keen
Publisher: Open Road + Grove/Atlantic
ISBN: 0802192319
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 288
View: 8103

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The renowned Internet commentator and author of How to Fix the Future“expos[es] the greed, egotism and narcissism that fuels the tech world” (Chicago Tribune). The Digital Revolution has contributed to the world in many positive ways, but we are less aware of the Internet’s deeply negative effects. The Internet Is Not the Answer, by longtime Internet skeptic Andrew Keen, offers a comprehensive look at what the Internet is doing to our lives. The book traces the technological and economic history of the Internet, from its founding in the 1960s through the rise of big data companies to the increasing attempts to monetize almost every human activity. In this sharp, witty narrative, informed by the work of other writers, reporters, and academics, as well as his own research and interviews, Keen shows us the tech world, warts and all. Startling and important, The Internet Is Not the Answer is a big-picture look at what the Internet is doing to our society and an investigation of what we can do to try to make sure the decisions we are making about the reconfiguring of our world do not lead to unpleasant, unforeseen aftershocks. “Andrew Keen has written a very powerful and daring manifesto questioning whether the Internet lives up to its own espoused values. He is not an opponent of Internet culture, he is its conscience, and must be heard.” —Po Bronson, #1 New York Times–bestselling author

Contemporary Art and Digital Culture


Author: Melissa Gronlund
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317386418
Category: Social Science
Page: 230
View: 1417

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Contemporary Art and Digital Culture analyses the impact of the internet and digital technologies upon art today. Art over the last fifteen years has been deeply inflected by the rise of the internet as a mass cultural and socio-political medium, while also responding to urgent economic and political events, from the financial crisis of 2008 to the ongoing conflicts in the Middle East. This book looks at how contemporary art addresses digitality, circulation, privacy, and globalisation, and suggests how feminism and gender binaries have been shifted by new mediations of identity. It situates current artistic practice both in canonical art history and in technological predecessors such as cybernetics and net.art, and takes stock of how the art-world infrastructure has reacted to the internet’s promises of democratisation. An invaluable resource for undergraduate and postgraduate students of contemporary art – especially those studying history of art and art practice and theory – as well as those working in film, media, curation, or art education. Melissa Gronlund is a writer and lecturer on contemporary art, specialising in the moving image. From 2007–2015, she was co-editor of the journal Afterall, and her writing has appeared there and in Artforum, e-flux journal, frieze, the NewYorker.com, and many other places.

Post Internet


Author: Gene McHugh
Publisher: Lulu Press, Inc
ISBN: 1291858407
Category: Reference
Page: N.A
View: 3750

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Post Internet is a blog developed between December 2009 and September 2010 by the New York based art critic Gene McHugh, thanks to a grant of the Creative Capital | Andy Warhol Foundation Arts Writers Grant Program. For almost a year, Gene McHugh kept filling this folder with his personal notes. Writing and posting became a daily, regular activity, that sometimes produced many posts a day, sometimes long (or very long) texts posted at a slower pace. However, Post Internet is not just a piece of beautiful criticism, as reading this book proves. It's also, in itself, a piece of Post Internet art in the shape of an art criticism blog. GENE MCHUGH is an art writer and curator based in Brooklyn. His writing has appeared in Artforum and Rhizome. McHugh is currently the Kress Fellow in Interpretive Technology at the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Duty Free Art

Art in the Age of Planetary Civil War
Author: Hito Steyerl
Publisher: Verso Books
ISBN: 1786632462
Category: Art
Page: 256
View: 5348

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What is the function of art in the era of digital globalization? How can one think of art institutions in an age defined by planetary civil war, growing inequality, and proprietary digital technology? The boundaries of such institutions have grown fuzzy. They extend from a region where the audience is pumped for tweets to a future of “neurocurating,” in which paintings surveil their audience via facial recognition and eye tracking to assess their popularity and to scan for suspicious activity. In Duty Free Art, filmmaker and writer Hito Steyerl wonders how we can appreciate, or even make art, in the present age. What can we do when arms manufacturers sponsor museums, and some of the world’s most valuable artworks are used as currency in a global futures market detached from productive work? Can we distinguish between information, fake news, and the digital white noise that bombards our everyday lives? Exploring subjects as diverse as video games, WikiLeaks files, the proliferation of freeports, and political actions, she exposes the paradoxes within globalization, political economies, visual culture, and the status of art production.

Understanding the Digital World

What You Need to Know about Computers, the Internet, Privacy, and Security
Author: Brian W. Kernighan
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400884802
Category: Computers
Page: 256
View: 982

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The basics of how computer hardware, software, and systems work, and the risks they create for our privacy and security Computers are everywhere. Some of them are highly visible, in laptops, tablets, cell phones, and smart watches. But most are invisible, like those in appliances, cars, medical equipment, transportation systems, power grids, and weapons. We never see the myriad computers that quietly collect, share, and sometimes leak vast amounts of personal data about us. Through computers, governments and companies increasingly monitor what we do. Social networks and advertisers know far more about us than we should be comfortable with, using information we freely give them. Criminals have all-too-easy access to our data. Do we truly understand the power of computers in our world? Understanding the Digital World explains how computer hardware, software, networks, and systems work. Topics include how computers are built and how they compute; what programming is and why it is difficult; how the Internet and the web operate; and how all of these affect our security, privacy, property, and other important social, political, and economic issues. This book also touches on fundamental ideas from computer science and some of the inherent limitations of computers. It includes numerous color illustrations, notes on sources for further exploration, and a glossary to explain technical terms and buzzwords. Understanding the Digital World is a must-read for all who want to know more about computers and communications. It explains, precisely and carefully, not only how they operate but also how they influence our daily lives, in terms anyone can understand, no matter what their experience and knowledge of technology.

How to Sell Your Art Online

Live a Successful Creative Life on Your Own Terms
Author: Cory Huff
Publisher: HarperCollins
ISBN: 0062414968
Category: Art
Page: 192
View: 8166

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An essential guide for artist that teaches them how to skip the gallery system, find their niche, and connect directly with collectors to profitably sell their art. For years, galleries have acted as gatekeeper separating artists and collectors. But with the explosion of the Internet, a new generation of savvy, independent artists is connecting with buyers and making a substantial living doing what they love. How to Sell Your Art Online shows any artist how to make a successful living from their work. Cory Huff dispels the myth of the starving artist and provides the effective business strategies necessary to make artistic creations pay. He helps individual artists find their niche; outlines the elements essential for an effective website; and provides invaluable advice on e-mail marketing, blogging, social media marketing, and paid advertising—explaining how to tie all these online activities into offline success. Most importantly, he shares the secret to overcoming the biggest challenge artists face when self-marketing: learning how to tell their unique stories. Every artist has a reason for making art, but can’t always find the right way to express it. Huff provides exercises artists can use to clarify the intellectual and emotional process behind their art, and teaches them how turn that knowledge into stories they can tell online and in person—and expand their reach through blogs and social media to build their art business. Drawing from the stories of successful artists, thoroughly describing how art is sold today, and providing tips on how to build connections personally and electronically, How to Sell Your Art Online illustrates the countless ways artists can take control of their creative careers—and sell their work without selling out.

Moving Image


Author: Omar Kholeif
Publisher: Mit Press
ISBN: 9780262528108
Category: Art
Page: 240
View: 762

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This anthology examines the expanded field of the moving image in recent art, tracing the genealogies of contemporary moving image work in performance, body art, experimental film, installation, and site-specific art from the 1960s to the present day. Contextualizing new developments made possible by advances in digital and networked technology, it locates contemporary practice within a global framework. Among the issues it examines are how new technologies, forms of apparatus, and modes of editing or framing affect innovations in artistic practice and strategy; how work is defined by local contexts, and the tensions that can arise when the local is represented globally; how we define a 'third space' for the filmic image and whether an installation area can be abstracted from geography; how performance-based work in this field explores bodies as borders or territories; the ways in which political, pedagogical, and collective forms of practice have affected the moving image; and the new platforms and modes of viewing that are evolving in response to the globally distributed condition of contemporary media. Artists surveyed include Jananne al-Ani, Francis Alÿs, Yuri Ancarani, Oreet Ashery, Ed Atkins, Judith Barry, Gretchen Bender, Dara Birnbaum, Black Audio Film Collective, Brad Butler, Olga Chernysheva, James Coleman, Minerva Cuevas, Stan Douglas, Olafur Eliasson, VALIE EXPORT, Harun Farocki, Omer Fast, Morgan Fisher, Hollis Frampton, Melanie Gilligan, Joana Hadjithomas, Gary Hill, Susan Hiller, William Kentridge, Anja Kirschner, Steve McQueen, Jumana Manna, Karen Mirza, Rabih Mroué, Otolith Group, Nam June Paik, Luther Price, Yvonne Rainer, R.V. Ramani, Pipilotti Rist, Ben Rivers, Ryan Trecartin, Trinh T. Minh-ha, Bill Viola Writers include Robert Bird, Claire Bishop, Christa Blümlinger, Jonathan Crary, T.J. Demos, Jean Fisher, Tim Griffin, Andrew Grossman, Félix Guattari, Shanay Jhaveri, Sven Lütticken, Francesco Manacorda, H.G. Masters, Andrew V. Uroskie, Ian White, Maxa Zoller, Thomas Zummer

Internet Art

The Online Clash of Culture and Commerce
Author: Julian Stallabrass
Publisher: Tate
ISBN: 9781854373458
Category: Art
Page: 168
View: 9992

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The development of Internet art has been short and rapid and dates from the introduction of web browsers in the mid-1990s. Artists realized the potential of a medium and system of delivery that side-stepped the mainstream art institutions and allowed them to make direct contact with an audience. Their interventions have ranged from works that deconstruct the browser itself, to works that shade into political activism. Internet art has been international, with distinct contributions emerging from the US, the Far East, Europe, the countries of the former Eastern Bloc, and the Third World.

Cyber Effect

An Expert in Cyberpsychology Explains how Technology is Shaping Our Children, Our Behavior, and Our Values--and what We Can Do about it
Author: Mary Aiken
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 0812987470
Category: Psychology
Page: 400
View: 8456

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Originally published in hardcover in 2016.

You're Never Weird on the Internet (Almost)

A Memoir
Author: Felicia Day
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 147678566X
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 304
View: 3489

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The instant New York Times bestseller from “queen of the geeks” Felicia Day, You’re Never Weird on the Internet (Almost) is a “relentlessly funny and surprisingly inspirational” (Forbes.com) memoir about her unusual upbringing, her rise to internet stardom, and embracing her weirdness to find her place in the world. When Felicia Day was a girl, all she wanted was to connect with other kids (desperately). Growing up in the Deep South, where she was “home-schooled for hippie reasons,” she looked online to find her tribe. The Internet was in its infancy and she became an early adopter at every stage of its growth—finding joy and unlikely friendships in the emerging digital world. Her relative isolation meant that she could pursue passions like gaming, calculus, and 1930’s detective novels without shame. Because she had no idea how “uncool” she really was. But if it hadn’t been for her strange background—the awkwardness continued when she started college at sixteen, with Mom driving her to campus every day—she might never have had the naïve confidence to forge her own path. Like when she graduated as valedictorian with a math degree and then headed to Hollywood to pursue a career in acting despite having zero contacts. Or when she tired of being typecast as the crazy cat-lady secretary and decided to create her own web series before people in show business understood that online video could be more than just cats chasing laser pointers. Felicia’s rags-to-riches rise to Internet fame launched her career as one of the most influen­tial creators in new media. Ever candid, she opens up about the rough patches along the way, recounting battles with writer’s block, a full-blown gaming addiction, severe anxiety, and depression—and how she reinvented herself when overachieving became overwhelming. Showcasing Felicia’s “engaging and often hilarious voice” (USA TODAY), You’re Never Weird on the Internet (Almost) is proof that everyone should celebrate what makes them different and be brave enough to share it with the world, because anything is possible now—even for a digital misfit.