Writing for Hire


Author: Catherine L. Fisk
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674973208
Category: Law
Page: 296
View: 5843

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Professional writers may earn a tidy living for their work, but they seldom own their writing. Catherine Fisk traces the history of labor relations that defined authorship in film, TV, and advertising in the mid-twentieth century, showing why strikingly different norms of attribution emerged in these overlapping industries.

Writing for Hire


Author: Catherine L. Fisk
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674973208
Category: Law
Page: 296
View: 6580

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Professional writers may earn a tidy living for their work, but they seldom own their writing. Catherine Fisk traces the history of labor relations that defined authorship in film, TV, and advertising in the mid-twentieth century, showing why strikingly different norms of attribution emerged in these overlapping industries.

Working in Hollywood

How the Studio System Turned Creativity into Labor
Author: Ronny Regev
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469637065
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 3339

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A history of the Hollywood film industry as a modern system of labor, this book reveals an important untold story of an influential twentieth-century workplace. Ronny Regev argues that the Hollywood studio system institutionalized creative labor by systemizing and standardizing the work of actors, directors, writers, and cinematographers, meshing artistic sensibilities with the efficiency-minded rationale of industrial capitalism. The employees of the studios emerged as a new class: they were wage laborers with enormous salaries, artists subjected to budgets and supervision, stars bound by contracts. As such, these workers--people like Clark Gable, Katharine Hepburn, and Anita Loos--were the outliers in the American workforce, an extraordinary working class. Through extensive use of oral histories, personal correspondence, studio archives, and the papers of leading Hollywood luminaries as well as their less-known contemporaries, Regev demonstrates that, as part of their contribution to popular culture, Hollywood studios such as Paramount, Warner Bros., and MGM cultivated a new form of labor, one that made work seem like fantasy.

The Oxford Handbook of Legal History


Author: Markus D. Dubber,Christopher Tomlins
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0192513141
Category: Law
Page: 1152
View: 9943

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Some of the most exciting and innovative legal scholarship has been driven by historical curiosity. Legal history today comes in a fascinating array of shapes and sizes, from microhistory to global intellectual history. Legal history has expanded beyond traditional parochial boundaries to become increasingly international and comparative in scope and orientation. Drawing on scholarship from around the world, and representing a variety of methodological approaches, areas of expertise, and research agendas, this timely compendium takes stock of legal history and methodology and reflects on the various modes of the historical analysis of law, past, present, and future. Part I explores the relationship between legal history and other disciplinary perspectives including economic, philosophical, comparative, literary, and rhetorical analysis of law. Part II considers various approaches to legal history, including legal history as doctrinal, intellectual, or social history. Part III focuses on the interrelation between legal history and jurisprudence by investigating the role and conception of historical inquiry in various models, schools, and movements of legal thought. Part IV traces the place and pursuit of historical analysis in various legal systems and traditions across time, cultures, and space. Finally, Part V narrows the Handbooks focus to explore several examples of legal history in action, including its use in various legal doctrinal contexts.

The Death Penalty As Torture

From the Dark Ages to Abolition
Author: John D. Bessler
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781611639261
Category:
Page: 460
View: 8715

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During the Dark Ages and the Renaissance, Europe¿s monarchs often resorted to torture and executions. The pain inflicted by instruments of torture¿from the thumbscrew and the rack to the Inquisition¿s tools of torment¿was eclipsed only by horrific methods of execution, from breaking on the wheel and crucifixion to drawing and quartering and burning at the stake. The English ¿Bloody Code¿ made more than 200 crimes punishable by death, and judicial torture¿expressly authorized by law and used to extract confessions¿permeated continental European legal systems. Judges regularly imposed death sentences and other harsh corporal punishments, from the stocks and the pillory, to branding and ear cropping, to lashes at public whipping posts. In the Enlightenment, jurists and writers questioned the efficacy of torture and capital punishment. In 1764, the Italian philosopher Cesare Beccaria¿the father of the world¿s anti¿death penalty movement¿condemned both practices. And Montesquieu, like Beccaria and others, concluded that any punishment that goes beyond absolute necessity is tyrannical. Traditionally, torture and executions have been viewed in separate legal silos, with countries renouncing acts of torture while simultaneously using capital punishment. The UN Convention Against Torture strictly prohibits physical or psychological torture; not even war or threat of war can be invoked to justify it. But under the guise of ¿lawful sanctions,¿ some countries continue to carry out executions even though they bear the indicia of torture. In The Death Penalty as Torture, Prof. John Bessler argues that death sentences and executions are medieval relics. In a world in which ¿mock¿ or simulated executions, as well as a host of other non-lethal acts, are already considered to be torturous, he contends that death sentences and executions should be classified under the rubric of torture. Unlike in the Middle Ages, penitentiaries¿one of the products of the Enlightenment¿now exist throughout the globe to house violent offenders. With the rise of life without parole sentences, and with more than four of five nations no longer using executions, The Death Penalty as Torture calls for the recognition of a peremptory, international law norm against the death penalty¿s use.

The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit


Author: Sloan Wilson
Publisher: Da Capo Press
ISBN: 0786729260
Category: Fiction
Page: 288
View: 6341

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Universally acclaimed when first published in 1955, The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit captured the mood of a generation. Its title — like Catch-22 and Fahrenheit 451 — has become a part of America's cultural vocabulary. Tom Rath doesn't want anything extraordinary out of life: just a decent home, enough money to support his family, and a career that won't crush his spirit. After returning from World War II, he takes a PR job at a television network. It is inane, dehumanizing work. But when a series of personal crises force him to reexamine his priorities — and take responsibility for his past — he is finally moved to carve out an identity for himself. This is Sloan Wilson's searing indictment of a society that had just begun to lose touch with its citizens. The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit is a classic of American literature and the basis of the award-winning film starring Gregory Peck. "A consequential novel." — Saturday Review

Working Knowledge

Employee Innovation and the Rise of Corporate Intellectual Property, 1800-1930
Author: Catherine L. Fisk
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807899069
Category: Law
Page: 376
View: 9555

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Skilled workers of the early nineteenth century enjoyed a degree of professional independence because workplace knowledge and technical skill were their "property," or at least their attribute. In most sectors of today's economy, however, it is a foundational and widely accepted truth that businesses retain legal ownership of employee-generated intellectual property. In Working Knowledge, Catherine Fisk chronicles the legal and social transformations that led to the transfer of ownership of employee innovation from labor to management. This deeply contested development was won at the expense of workers' entrepreneurial independence and ultimately, Fisk argues, economic democracy. By reviewing judicial decisions and legal scholarship on all aspects of employee-generated intellectual property and combing the archives of major nineteenth-century intellectual property-producing companies--including DuPont, Rand McNally, and the American Tobacco Company--Fisk makes a highly technical area of law accessible to general readers while also addressing scholarly deficiencies in the histories of labor, intellectual property, and the business of technology.

Fast Food Nation

The Dark Side of the All-American Meal
Author: Eric Schlosser
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 0547750331
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 362
View: 1542

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Explores the homogenization of American culture and the impact of the fast food industry on modern-day health, economy, politics, popular culture, entertainment, and food production.

The Death and Life of Great American Cities


Author: Jane Jacobs
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 052543285X
Category: Social Science
Page: 480
View: 4920

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Thirty years after its publication, The Death and Life of Great American Cities was described by The New York Times as "perhaps the most influential single work in the history of town planning....[It] can also be seen in a much larger context. It is first of all a work of literature; the descriptions of street life as a kind of ballet and the bitingly satiric account of traditional planning theory can still be read for pleasure even by those who long ago absorbed and appropriated the book's arguments." Jane Jacobs, an editor and writer on architecture in New York City in the early sixties, argued that urban diversity and vitality were being destroyed by powerful architects and city planners. Rigorous, sane, and delightfully epigrammatic, Jacobs's small masterpiece is a blueprint for the humanistic management of cities. It is sensible, knowledgeable, readable, indispensable. The author has written a new foreword for this Modern Library edition.

Union of Words

A History of Presidential Eloquence
Author: Wayne Fields
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Political Science
Page: 406
View: 3374

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Traces the history of presidential rhetoric to examine the president's vital role in fostering a spirit of unity among all Americans

The Art of Immersion: How the Digital Generation Is Remaking Hollywood, Madison Avenue, and the Way We Tell Stories


Author: Frank Rose
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393341259
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 384
View: 2016

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A contributing editor at Wired examines the way entertainment has shifted in the face of new media and discusses the way that people such as Will Wright, James Cameron and Damon Lindelof are changing how we play, relax and think. Reprint.

International Intellectual Property

A Handbook of Contemporary Research
Author: Daniel J. Gervais
Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing
ISBN: 1782544801
Category: Law
Page: 512
View: 2289

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International Intellectual Property: A Handbook of Contemporary Research provides researchers and practitioners of international intellectual property law with the necessary tools to understand the latest debates in this incredibly dynamic and complex

Global Public Relations

Spanning Borders, Spanning Cultures
Author: Alan R. Freitag,Ashli Quesinberry Stokes
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134061293
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 328
View: 9522

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This text provides a structured and practical framework for understanding the complexities of contemporary public relations. It is an instructional book that guides the reader through the challenges of communication and problem solving across a range of organizations and cross-cultural settings. Written in a straightforward, lively style, the book covers: foundational theories, and factors that shape the discipline communication across cultures trends affecting the public relations profession throughout the world. Incorporating case studies and commentary to illustrate key principles and stimulate discussion, this book also highlights the different approaches professionals must consider in different contexts, from communicating with employees to liaising with external bodies, such as government agencies or the media. Offering a truly global perspective on the subject, Global Public Relations is essential reading for any student or practitioner interested in public relations excellence in a global setting. A companion website provides additional material for lecturers and students alike: www.routledge.com/textbooks/9780415448154/

Marvel Comics

The Untold Story
Author: Sean Howe
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062314696
Category: History
Page: 496
View: 5591

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An unvarnished, unauthorized, behind-the-scenes account of one of the most dominant pop cultural forces in contemporary America Operating out of a tiny office on Madison Avenue in the early 1960s, a struggling company called Marvel Comics presented a cast of brightly costumed characters distinguished by smart banter and compellingly human flaws. Spider-Man, the Fantastic Four, Captain America, the Incredible Hulk, the Avengers, Iron Man, Thor, the X-Men, Daredevil—these superheroes quickly won children's hearts and sparked the imaginations of pop artists, public intellectuals, and campus radicals. Over the course of a half century, Marvel's epic universe would become the most elaborate fictional narrative in history and serve as a modern American mythology for millions of readers. Throughout this decades-long journey to becoming a multibillion-dollar enterprise, Marvel's identity has continually shifted, careening between scrappy underdog and corporate behemoth. As the company has weathered Wall Street machinations, Hollywood failures, and the collapse of the comic book market, its characters have been passed along among generations of editors, artists, and writers—also known as the celebrated Marvel "Bullpen." Entrusted to carry on tradition, Marvel's contributors—impoverished child prodigies, hallucinating peaceniks, and mercenary careerists among them—struggled with commercial mandates, a fickle audience, and, over matters of credit and control, one another. For the first time, Marvel Comics reveals the outsized personalities behind the scenes, including Martin Goodman, the self-made publisher who forayed into comics after a get-rich-quick tip in 1939; Stan Lee, the energetic editor who would shepherd the company through thick and thin for decades; and Jack Kirby, the World War II veteran who'd co-created Captain America in 1940 and, twenty years later, developed with Lee the bulk of the company's marquee characters in a three-year frenzy of creativity that would be the grounds for future legal battles and endless debates. Drawing on more than one hundred original interviews with Marvel insiders then and now, Marvel Comics is a story of fertile imaginations, lifelong friendships, action-packed fistfights, reformed criminals, unlikely alliances, and third-act betrayals— a narrative of one of the most extraordinary, beloved, and beleaguered pop cultural entities in America's history.

We're Going to Need More Wine

Stories That Are Funny, Complicated, and True
Author: Gabrielle Union
Publisher: HarperCollins
ISBN: 0062694006
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 272
View: 2740

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NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER Nominated for the NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work Named a Best Book of the Year by The Root Chosen by Emma Straub as a Best New Celebrity Memoir “A book of essays as raw and honest as anyone has ever produced.” — Lena Dunham, Lenny Letter In the spirit of Amy Poehler’s Yes Please, Lena Dunham’s Not That Kind of Girl, and Roxane Gay's Bad Feminist, a powerful collection of essays about gender, sexuality, race, beauty, Hollywood, and what it means to be a modern woman. One month before the release of the highly anticipated film The Birth of a Nation, actress Gabrielle Union shook the world with a vulnerable and impassioned editorial in which she urged our society to have compassion for victims of sexual violence. In the wake of rape allegations made against director and actor Nate Parker, Union—a forty-four-year-old actress who launched her career with roles in iconic ’90s movies—instantly became the insightful, outspoken actress that Hollywood has been desperately awaiting. With honesty and heartbreaking wisdom, she revealed her own trauma as a victim of sexual assault: "It is for you that I am speaking. This is real. We are real." In this moving collection of thought provoking essays infused with her unique wisdom and deep humor, Union uses that same fearlessness to tell astonishingly personal and true stories about power, color, gender, feminism, and fame. Union tackles a range of experiences, including bullying, beauty standards, and competition between women in Hollywood, growing up in white California suburbia and then spending summers with her black relatives in Nebraska, coping with crushes, puberty, and the divorce of her parents. Genuine and perceptive, Union bravely lays herself bare, uncovering a complex and courageous life of self-doubt and self-discovery with incredible poise and brutal honesty. Throughout, she compels us to be ethical and empathetic, and reminds us of the importance of confidence, self-awareness, and the power of sharing truth, laughter, and support.

The Case Against Immigration

The Moral, Economic, Social, and Environmental Reasons for Reducing U.S. Immigration Back to Traditional Levels
Author: Roy Howard Beck
Publisher: Roy Beck
ISBN: 0393039153
Category: Social Science
Page: 287
View: 2435

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Argues current immigration levels hurt individuals to communities

Telling Stories Out of Court

Narratives about Women and Workplace Discrimination
Author: Ruth O'Brien
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801473579
Category: Law
Page: 241
View: 3339

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Fictional short stories illustrating the experiences of women who have faced sexism and discrimination at work, grouped into thematic clusters with interpretive commentary and legal analysis.

The Legal Profession


Author: Ann Southworth,Catherine L. Fisk
Publisher: West Academic Publishing
ISBN: 9781628101720
Category: Law
Page: 1138
View: 8438

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Unlike most Professional Responsibility books on the market, this book integrates ethical and legal perspectives with the best available empirical literature on the legal profession. It covers all of the basic ethics topics covered in the standard professional responsibility course, but it blends the coverage of doctrine with an in-depth survey of the legal profession. It links legal ethics with materials drawn from other disciplines, especially sociology, economics, and psychology, to help students appreciate actual practice realities and the implications for daily experience. It includes some of the classic cases and materials on professional responsibility and also features up-to-date problems and materials on current issues. This is the only PR book on the market that provides sufficient explanation of basic legal concepts and the operation of the legal system to make it suitable for first-year students. It includes an extensive teachers' manual with sample syllabi, detailed advice about how to teach the materials, written instructions for role-play exercises, and sample exam questions.

The Art of Fielding

A Novel
Author: Chad Harbach
Publisher: Little, Brown
ISBN: 0316192163
Category: Fiction
Page: 528
View: 4447

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At Westish College, a small school on the shore of Lake Michigan, baseball star Henry Skrimshander seems destined for big league stardom. But when a routine throw goes disastrously off course, the fates of five people are upended. Henry's fight against self-doubt threatens to ruin his future. College president Guert Affenlight, a longtime bachelor, has fallen unexpectedly and helplessly in love. Owen Dunne, Henry's gay roommate and teammate, becomes caught up in a dangerous affair. Mike Schwartz, the Harpooners' team captain and Henry's best friend, realizes he has guided Henry's career at the expense of his own. And Pella Affenlight, Guert's daughter, returns to Westish after escaping an ill-fated marriage, determined to start a new life. As the season counts down to its climactic final game, these five are forced to confront their deepest hopes, anxieties, and secrets. In the process they forge new bonds, and help one another find their true paths. Written with boundless intelligence and filled with the tenderness of youth, The Art of Fielding is an expansive, warmhearted novel about ambition and its limits, about family and friendship and love, and about commitment--to oneself and to others.