Women's Work

The First 20,000 Years : Women, Cloth, and Society in Early Times
Author: E. J. W. Barber
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393313482
Category: Social Science
Page: 334
View: 1806

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Drawing on the latest archaeological and technological research, this intriguing study of women's history explores the relationship between the development of the fiber arts and women's roles in society.

Women's Work: The First 20,000 Years Women, Cloth, and Society in Early Times


Author: Elizabeth Wayland Barber
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393285588
Category: Social Science
Page: 336
View: 8239

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"A fascinating history of…[a craft] that preceded and made possible civilization itself." —New York Times Book Review New discoveries about the textile arts reveal women's unexpectedly influential role in ancient societies. Twenty thousand years ago, women were making and wearing the first clothing created from spun fibers. In fact, right up to the Industrial Revolution the fiber arts were an enormous economic force, belonging primarily to women. Despite the great toil required in making cloth and clothing, most books on ancient history and economics have no information on them. Much of this gap results from the extreme perishability of what women produced, but it seems clear that until now descriptions of prehistoric and early historic cultures have omitted virtually half the picture. Elizabeth Wayland Barber has drawn from data gathered by the most sophisticated new archaeological methods—methods she herself helped to fashion. In a "brilliantly original book" (Katha Pollitt, Washington Post Book World), she argues that women were a powerful economic force in the ancient world, with their own industry: fabric.

Women's Work

The First 20,000 Years : Women, Cloth, and Society in Early Times
Author: E. J. W. Barber
Publisher: W W Norton & Company Incorporated
ISBN: 9780393313482
Category: Social Science
Page: 334
View: 3319

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Drawing on the latest archaeological and technological research, this intriguing study of women's history explores the relationship between the development of the fiber arts and women's roles in society.

The Mummies of Ürümchi


Author: Elizabeth Wayland Barber
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393320190
Category: History
Page: 240
View: 3680

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A look at the incredibly well-preserved ancient mummies found in Western China describes their clothing and appearance, attempts to reconstruct their culture, and speculates about how Caucasians could have found their way to the feet of the Himalayan mountains. Reprint.

Women in the Classical World

Image and Text
Author: Elaine Fantham,Helene Peet Foley,Natalie Boymel Kampen,Sarah B. Pomeroy,H. A. Shapiro
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199762163
Category: History
Page: 448
View: 8157

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Information about women is scattered throughout the fragmented mosaic of ancient history: the vivid poetry of Sappho survived antiquity on remnants of damaged papyrus; the inscription on a beautiful fourth century B.C.E. grave praises the virtues of Mnesarete, an Athenian woman who died young; a great number of Roman wives were found guilty of poisoning their husbands, but was it accidental food poisoning, or disease, or something more sinister. Apart from the legends of Cleopatra, Dido and Lucretia, and images of graceful maidens dancing on urns, the evidence about the lives of women of the classical world--visual, archaeological, and written--has remained uncollected and uninterpreted. Now, the lavishly illustrated and meticulously researched Women in the Classical World lifts the curtain on the women of ancient Greece and Rome, exploring the lives of slaves and prostitutes, Athenian housewives, and Rome's imperial family. The first book on classical women to give equal weight to written texts and artistic representations, it brings together a great wealth of materials--poetry, vase painting, legislation, medical treatises, architecture, religious and funerary art, women's ornaments, historical epics, political speeches, even ancient coins--to present women in the historical and cultural context of their time. Written by leading experts in the fields of ancient history and art history, women's studies, and Greek and Roman literature, the book's chronological arrangement allows the changing roles of women to unfold over a thousand-year period, beginning in the eighth century B.C.E. Both the art and the literature highlight women's creativity, sexuality and coming of age, marriage and childrearing, religious and public roles, and other themes. Fascinating chapters report on the wild behavior of Spartan and Etruscan women and the mythical Amazons; the changing views of the female body presented in male-authored gynecological treatises; the "new woman" represented by the love poetry of the late Republic and Augustan Age; and the traces of upper- and lower-class life in Pompeii, miraculously preserved by the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 C.E. Provocative and surprising, Women in the Classical World is a masterly foray into the past, and a definitive statement on the lives of women in ancient Greece and Rome.

Goddesses, Whores, Wives, and Slaves

Women in Classical Antiquity
Author: Sarah Pomeroy
Publisher: Schocken
ISBN: 0307791475
Category: History
Page: 304
View: 8721

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"The first general treatment of women in the ancient world to reflect the critical insights of modern feminism. Though much debated, its position as the basic textbook on women's history in Greece and Rome has hardly been challenged."--Mary Beard, Times Literary Supplement. Illustrations. From the Trade Paperback edition.

World Textiles

A Concise History
Author: Mary Schoeser
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780500203699
Category: Art
Page: 224
View: 2370

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A history of textiles and their significance and use in cultures from prehistoric times to the present discusses materials, techniques, and design and considers the influences of the trade in textiles and technological changes.

At Day's Close: Night in Times Past


Author: A. Roger Ekirch
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393344584
Category: History
Page: 480
View: 3541

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"Remarkable…Ekirch has emptied night's pockets, and laid the contents out before us." —Arthur Krystal, The New Yorker Bringing light to the shadows of history through a "rich weave of citation and archival evidence" (Publishers Weekly), scholar A. Roger Ekirch illuminates the aspects of life most often overlooked by other historians—those that unfold at night. In this "triumph of social history" (Mail on Sunday), Ekirch's "enthralling anthropology" (Harper's) exposes the nightlife that spawned a distinct culture and a refuge from daily life. Fear of crime, of fire, and of the supernatural; the importance of moonlight; the increased incidence of sickness and death at night; evening gatherings to spin wool and stories; masqued balls; inns, taverns, and brothels; the strategies of thieves, assassins, and conspirators; the protective uses of incantations, meditations, and prayers; the nature of our predecessors' sleep and dreams—Ekirch reveals all these and more in his "monumental study" (The Nation) of sociocultural history, "maintaining throughout an infectious sense of wonder" (Booklist).

Iconic Costumes

Scandinavian Late Iron Age Costume Iconography
Author: Ulla Mannering
Publisher: Oxbow Books
ISBN: 1785702165
Category: Crafts & Hobbies
Page: 288
View: 7468

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This richly illustrated book presents a selection of the rich and varied iconographic material from the Scandinavian Late Iron Age (AD 400-1050) depicting clothed human figures, from an archaeological textile and clothing perspective. The source material consists of five object categories: gold foils, gold bracteates, helmet plaques, jewelry, and textile tapestries and comprises over 1000 different images of male and female costumes which are then systematically examined in conjunction with our present knowledge of archaeological textiles. In particular, the study explores the question of whether the selected images complement the archaeological clothing sources, through a new analytical tool which enables us to compare and contrast the object categories in regard to material, function, chronology, context and interpretation. The tool is used to record and analyze the numerous details of the iconographic costumes, and to facilitate a clear and easy description. This deliberate use of explicit costume shapes enhances our interpretation and understanding of the Late Iron Age clothing tradition. Thus, the majority of the costumes depicted are identified in the Scandinavian archaeological textile record, demonstrating that the depictions are a reliable source of research for both iconographical costume and archaeological clothing. The book contributes with new information on social, regional and chronological differences in clothing traditions from ca. AD 400 to the Viking Age.

Mothers of Invention

Women of the Slaveholding South in the American Civil War
Author: Drew Gilpin Faust
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807855737
Category: History
Page: 326
View: 3009

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Exploring privileged Confederate women's wartime experiences, this book chronicles the clash of the old and the new within a group that was at once the beneficiary and the victim of the social order of the Old South.

One Thousand White Women

The Journals of May Dodd
Author: Jim Fergus
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 9781429938846
Category: Fiction
Page: 304
View: 5569

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One Thousand White Women is the story of May Dodd and a colorful assembly of pioneer women who, under the auspices of the U.S. government, travel to the western prairies in 1875 to intermarry among the Cheyenne Indians. The covert and controversial "Brides for Indians" program, launched by the administration of Ulysses S. Grant, is intended to help assimilate the Indians into the white man's world. Toward that end May and her friends embark upon the adventure of their lifetime. Jim Fergus has so vividly depicted the American West that it is as if these diaries are a capsule in time.

The Subversive Stitch

Embroidery and the Making of the Feminine
Author: Rozsika Parker
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 0857721925
Category: Art
Page: 336
View: 2028

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Rozsika Parker's re-evaluation of the reciprocal relationship between women and embroidery has brought stitchery out from the private world of female domesticity into the fine arts, created a major breakthrough in art history and criticism, and fostered the emergence of today's dynamic and expanding crafts movements._x000D_ _x000D_ 'The Subversive Stitch' is now available again with a new Introduction that brings the book up to date with exploration of the stitched art of Louise Bourgeois and Tracey Emin, as well as the work of new young female and male embroiderers. Rozsika Parker uses household accounts, women's magazines, letters, novels and the works of art themselves to trace through history how the separation of the craft of embroidery from the fine arts came to be a major force in the marginalisation of women's work. Beautifully illustrated, her book also discusses the contradictory nature of women's experience of embroidery: how it has inculcated female subservience while providing an immensely pleasurable source of creativity, forging links between women._x000D_ _x000D_ "A book wonderfully rich, not only in information, but in people and ideas." - 'Guardian'_x000D_ _x000D_ "A marvellously written and illustrated book." - 'Times Educational Supplement'

5000 Years of Textiles


Author: Jennifer Harris
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780714150895
Category: Textile crafts
Page: 320
View: 4885

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The first comprehensive survey in colour of textile art and production from pre-history to the present day, this book's geographical coverage spans the world from the Middle and Near East to Europe, the Americas and Africa, taking in Byzantine silks, the Ottaman Empire, Eastern carpets, damask, lace, tapestry and much more besides. Lavishly illustrated with examples drawn from major collections all over the world, including costumes, period interiors and fabrics, as well as numerous archive photographs. An introductory section explains the various methods of making and decorating cloth through the ages.

Twelve Thousand Years

American Indians in Maine
Author: Bruce Bourque
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803262317
Category: Social Science
Page: 368
View: 3298

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Documents the generations of Native peoples who for twelve millennia have moved through and eventually settled along the rocky coast, rivers, lakes, valleys, and mountains of a region now known as Maine.

Women & Power

A Manifesto
Author: Mary Beard
Publisher: Profile Books
ISBN: 1782834532
Category: Social Science
Page: 74
View: 8627

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Number One Sunday Times Bestseller Why the popular resonance of 'mansplaining' (despite the intense dislike of the term felt by many men)? It hits home for us because it points straight to what it feels like not to be taken seriously: a bit like when I get lectured on Roman history on Twitter. Britain's best-known classicist Mary Beard, is also a committed and vocal feminist. With wry wit, she revisits the gender agenda and shows how history has treated powerful women. Her examples range from the classical world to the modern day, from Medusa and Athena to Theresa May and Hillary Clinton. Beard explores the cultural underpinnings of misogyny, considering the public voice of women, our cultural assumptions about women's relationship with power, and how powerful women resist being packaged into a male template. With personal reflections on her own experiences of the sexism and gendered aggression she has endured online, Mary asks: if women aren't perceived to be within the structures of power, isn't it power that we need to redefine? From the author of international bestseller SPQR: A History of Ancient Rome.

No Idle Hands

The Social History of American Knitting
Author: Anne L. MacDonald
Publisher: Ballantine Books
ISBN: 0307775445
Category: Crafts & Hobbies
Page: 512
View: 9714

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“Fascinating . . . What is remarkable about this book is that a history of knitting can function so well as a survey of the changes in women’s rolse over time.”—The New York Times Book Review An historian and lifelong knitter, Anne Macdonald expertly guides readers on a revealing tour of the history of knitting in America. In No Idle Hands, Macdonald considers how the necessity—and the pleasure—of knitting has shaped women’s lives. Here is the Colonial woman for whom idleness was a sin, and her Victorian counterpart, who enjoyed the pleasure of knitting while visiting with friends; the war wife eager to provide her man with warmth and comfort, and the modern woman busy creating fashionable handknits for herself and her family. Macdonald examines each phase of American history and gives us a clear and compelling look at life, then and now. And through it all, we see how knitting has played an important part in the way society has viewed women—and how women have viewed themselves. Assembled from articles in magazines, knitting brochures, newspaper clippings and other primary sources, and featuring reproductions of advertisements, illustrations, and photographs from each period, No Idle Hands capture the texture of women’s domestic lives throughout history with great wit and insight. “Colorful and revealing . . . vivid . . . This book will intrigue needlewomen and students of domestic history alike.”—The Washington Post Book World

Bad Girls Throughout History

100 Remarkable Women Who Changed the World
Author: Ann Shen
Publisher: Chronicle Books
ISBN: 1452157022
Category: Art
Page: 216
View: 3203

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Aphra Behn, first female professional writer. Sojourner Truth, activist and abolitionist. Ada Lovelace, first computer programmer. Marie Curie, first woman to win the Nobel Prize. Joan Jett, godmother of punk. The 100 revolutionary women highlighted in this gorgeously illustrated book were bad in the best sense of the word: they challenged the status quo and changed the rules for all who followed. From pirates to artists, warriors, daredevils, scientists, activists, and spies, the accomplishments of these incredible women vary as much as the eras and places in which they effected change. Featuring bold watercolor portraits and illuminating essays by Ann Shen, Bad Girls Throughout History is a distinctive, worthy tribute.

The First Thousand Years

A Global History of Christianity
Author: Robert Louis Wilken
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300118848
Category: History
Page: 388
View: 4630

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Describes the first 1,000 years of Christian history, from the early practices and beliefs through the conversion of Constantine as well as documenting its growth to communities in Ethiopia, Armenia, Central Asia, India and China.

Textiles

The Whole Story
Author: Beverly Gordon
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780500291139
Category: Design
Page: 304
View: 6397

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Examines textile fabrics' physical, psychological, social, commercial, and spiritual applications and significance in people's daily lives throughout history.

Work

The Last 1,000 Years
Author: Andrea Komlosy
Publisher: Verso Books
ISBN: 1786634120
Category: Social Science
Page: 272
View: 688

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Tracing the complexity and contradictory nature of work throughout history By the end of the nineteenth century, the general Western conception of work had been reduced to simply gainful employment. But this limited perspective contrasted sharply with the personal experience of most people in the world—whether in colonies, developing countries or in the industrializing world. Moreover, from a feminist perspective, reducing work and the production of value to remunerated employment has never been convincing. Andrea Komlosy argues in this important intervention that, when we examine it closely, work changes its meanings according to different historical and regional contexts. Globalizing labour history from the thirteenth to the twenty-first centuries, she sheds light on the complex coexistence of multiple forms of labour (paid/unpaid, free/unfree, with various forms of legal regulation and social protection and so on) on the local and the world levels. Combining this global approach with a gender perspective opens our eyes to the varieties of work and labour and their combination in households and commodity chains across the planet—processes that enable capital accumulation not only by extracting surplus value from wage-labour, but also through other forms of value transfer, realized by tapping into households’ subsistence production, informal occupation and makeshift employment. As the debate about work and its supposed disappearance intensifies, Komlosy’s book provides a crucial shift in the angle of vision.