Wild Nights

How Taming Sleep Created Our Restless World
Author: Benjamin Reiss
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465094856
Category: History
Page: 320
View: 9818

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Why the modern world forgot how to sleep Why is sleep frustrating for so many people? Why do we spend so much time and money managing and medicating it, and training ourselves and our children to do it correctly? In Wild Nights, Benjamin Reiss finds answers in sleep's hidden history--one that leads to our present, sleep-obsessed society, its tacitly accepted rules, and their troubling consequences. Today we define a good night's sleep very narrowly: eight hours in one shot, sealed off in private bedrooms, children apart from parents. But for most of human history, practically no one slept this way. Tracing sleep's transformation since the dawn of the industrial age, Reiss weaves together insights from literature, social and medical history, and cutting-edge science to show how and why we have tried and failed to tame sleep. In lyrical prose, he leads readers from bedrooms and laboratories to factories and battlefields to Henry David Thoreau's famous cabin at Walden Pond, telling the stories of troubled sleepers, hibernating peasants, sleepwalking preachers, cave-dwelling sleep researchers, slaves who led nighttime uprisings, rebellious workers, spectacularly frazzled parents, and utopian dreamers. We are hardly the first people, Reiss makes clear, to chafe against our modern rules for sleeping. A stirring testament to sleep's diversity, Wild Nights offers a profound reminder that in the vulnerability of slumber we can find our shared humanity. By peeling back the covers of history, Reiss recaptures sleep's mystery and grandeur and offers hope to weary readers: as sleep was transformed once before, so too can it change today.

Wild Nights

How Taming Sleep Created Our Restless World
Author: Benjamin Reiss
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 0465094856
Category: History
Page: 320
View: 1839

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Why the modern world forgot how to sleep Why is sleep frustrating for so many people? Why do we spend so much time and money managing and medicating it, and training ourselves and our children to do it correctly? In Wild Nights, Benjamin Reiss finds answers in sleep's hidden history--one that leads to our present, sleep-obsessed society, its tacitly accepted rules, and their troubling consequences. Today we define a good night's sleep very narrowly: eight hours in one shot, sealed off in private bedrooms, children apart from parents. But for most of human history, practically no one slept this way. Tracing sleep's transformation since the dawn of the industrial age, Reiss weaves together insights from literature, social and medical history, and cutting-edge science to show how and why we have tried and failed to tame sleep. In lyrical prose, he leads readers from bedrooms and laboratories to factories and battlefields to Henry David Thoreau's famous cabin at Walden Pond, telling the stories of troubled sleepers, hibernating peasants, sleepwalking preachers, cave-dwelling sleep researchers, slaves who led nighttime uprisings, rebellious workers, spectacularly frazzled parents, and utopian dreamers. We are hardly the first people, Reiss makes clear, to chafe against our modern rules for sleeping. A stirring testament to sleep's diversity, Wild Nights offers a profound reminder that in the vulnerability of slumber we can find our shared humanity. By peeling back the covers of history, Reiss recaptures sleep's mystery and grandeur and offers hope to weary readers: as sleep was transformed once before, so too can it change today.

Wild Nights

How Taming Sleep Created Our Restless World
Author: Benjamin Reiss
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 9780465061952
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 470

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Why the modern world forgot how to sleep Why is sleep so frustrating for so many people? While human history presents a vast diversity of sleeping styles, today we define a good night s sleep very narrowly: eight hours in one straight shot, sealed off in private bedrooms, children apart from parents. The curious product of industrialization, electricity, medicine, and capitalism, this set of sleeping rules has existed for only a few centuries. Yet few seem to be able to live by them. For the world s poor, modern sleep is full of financial and physical risk; but even the well-off now require drugs and gadgets to regulate waking and sleeping. Taming sleep is big business, but it has come at an enormous cost to our well-being. In "Wild Nights, " Benjamin Reiss draws on centuries of literary, medical, and scientific writings to show how ordinary lives were upended as sleep became modern. In so doing, he offers hope to weary readers: as sleep was transformed once before, so too can it change again today. "

At Day's Close: Night in Times Past


Author: A. Roger Ekirch
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393344584
Category: History
Page: 480
View: 8676

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"Remarkable…Ekirch has emptied night's pockets, and laid the contents out before us." —Arthur Krystal, The New Yorker Bringing light to the shadows of history through a "rich weave of citation and archival evidence" (Publishers Weekly), scholar A. Roger Ekirch illuminates the aspects of life most often overlooked by other historians—those that unfold at night. In this "triumph of social history" (Mail on Sunday), Ekirch's "enthralling anthropology" (Harper's) exposes the nightlife that spawned a distinct culture and a refuge from daily life. Fear of crime, of fire, and of the supernatural; the importance of moonlight; the increased incidence of sickness and death at night; evening gatherings to spin wool and stories; masqued balls; inns, taverns, and brothels; the strategies of thieves, assassins, and conspirators; the protective uses of incantations, meditations, and prayers; the nature of our predecessors' sleep and dreams—Ekirch reveals all these and more in his "monumental study" (The Nation) of sociocultural history, "maintaining throughout an infectious sense of wonder" (Booklist).

Evening's Empire

A History of the Night in Early Modern Europe
Author: Craig Koslofsky
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521896436
Category: History
Page: 431
View: 4641

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This illuminating guide to the night opens up an entirely new vista on early modern Europe. Using diaries, letters, legal records and representations of the night in early modern religion, literature and art, Craig Koslofsky explores the myriad ways in which early modern people understood, experienced and transformed the night.

The Showman and the Slave


Author: Benjamin Reiss
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674042654
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 4205

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Reiss uses P. T. Barnum's Joice Heth hoax to examine the contours of race relations in the antebellum North. Barnum's first exhibit as a showman, Heth was an elderly enslaved woman said to be the 161-year-old former nurse of the infant George Washington. Seizing upon the novelty, the newly emerging commercial press turned her act--and especially her death--into one of the first media spectacles in American history.

Theaters of Madness

Insane Asylums and Nineteenth-Century American Culture
Author: Benjamin Reiss
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226709655
Category: Psychology
Page: 240
View: 2790

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In the mid-1800s, a utopian movement to rehabilitate the insane resulted in a wave of publicly funded asylums—many of which became unexpected centers of cultural activity. Housed in magnificent structures with lush grounds, patients participated in theatrical programs, debating societies, literary journals, schools, and religious services. Theaters of Madness explores both the culture these rich offerings fomented and the asylum’s place in the fabric of nineteenth-century life, reanimating a time when the treatment of the insane was a central topic in debates over democracy, freedom, and modernity. Benjamin Reiss explores the creative lives of patients and the cultural demands of their doctors. Their frequently clashing views turned practically all of American culture—from blackface minstrel shows to the works of William Shakespeare—into a battlefield in the war on insanity. Reiss also shows how asylums touched the lives and shaped the writing of key figures, such as Emerson and Poe, who viewed the system alternately as the fulfillment of a democratic ideal and as a kind of medical enslavement. Without neglecting this troubling contradiction, Theaters of Madness prompts us to reflect on what our society can learn from a generation that urgently and creatively tried to solve the problem of mental illness.

The Slumbering Masses

Sleep, Medicine, and Modern American Life
Author: Matthew J. Wolf-Meyer
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 0816674744
Category: Health & Fitness
Page: 288
View: 9805

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Addresses the phenomenon of sleep and sleeplessness in the United States, tracing the influence of medicine and industrial capitalism on the sleeping habits of Americans from the 19th century to the present

The Mystery of Sleep

Why a Good Night's Rest Is Vital to a Better, Healthier Life
Author: Meir Kryger
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300224087
Category: Health & Fitness
Page: 344
View: 4647

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An authoritative and accessible guide to what happens when we shut our eyes at night We spend a third of our lives in bed, but how much do we really understand about how sleep affects us? In the past forty years, scientists have discovered that our sleep (or lack of it) can affect nearly every aspect of our waking lives. Poor sleep could be a sign of a disease, the result of a vitamin or iron deficiency, or the cause of numerous other problems, both sleeping and waking. Yet many people, even medical personnel, are unaware of the dangers of poor sleep. Enter Dr. Meir Kryger, a world authority on the science of sleep, with a comprehensive guide to the mysteries of slumber that combines detailed case studies, helpful tables, illustrations, and pragmatic advice. Everyone needs a good night's sleep, and many of us will experience some difficulty sleeping or staying awake over the course of our lifetimes (or know someone who does). Kryger's comprehensive text is a much‑needed resource for insomniacs; for those who snore, can't stay awake, or experience disturbing dreams; and for the simply curious. Uniquely wide ranging, The Mystery of Sleep is more than a handbook; it is a guide to the world of sleep and the mysterious disorders that affect it.

Diet and the Disease of Civilization


Author: Adrienne Rose Bitar
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813589665
Category: Social Science
Page: 244
View: 2963

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Diet books contribute to a $60-billion industry as they speak to the 45 million Americans who diet every year. Yet these books don’t just tell readers what to eat: they offer complete philosophies about who Americans are and how we should live. Diet and the Disease of Civilization interrupts the predictable debate about eating right to ask a hard question: what if it’s not calories—but concepts—that should be counted? Cultural critic Adrienne Rose Bitar reveals how four popular diets retell the “Fall of Man” as the narrative backbone for our national consciousness. Intensifying the moral panic of the obesity epidemic, they depict civilization itself as a disease and offer diet as the one true cure. Bitar reads each diet—the Paleo Diet, the Garden of Eden Diet, the Pacific Island Diet, the detoxification or detox diet—as both myth and manual, a story with side effects shaping social movements, driving industry, and constructing fundamental ideas about sickness and health. Diet and the Disease of Civilization unearths the ways in which diet books are actually utopian manifestos not just for better bodies, but also for a healthier society and a more perfect world.

How to Sleep

The Art, Biology and Culture of Unconsciousness
Author: Matthew Fuller
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1474288731
Category: Philosophy
Page: 240
View: 7611

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Sleep is quite a popular activity, indeed most humans spend around a third of their lives asleep. However, cultural, political, or aesthetic thought tends to remain concerned with the interpretation and actions of those who are awake. How to Sleep argues instead that sleep is a complex vital phenomena with a dynamic aesthetic and biological consistency. Arguing through examples drawn from contemporary, modern and renaissance art; from literature; film and computational media, and bringing these into relation with the history and findings of sleep science, this book argues for a new interplay between biology and culture. Meditations on sex, exhaustion, drugs, hormones and scientific instruments all play their part in this wide-ranging exposition of sleep as an ecology of interacting processes. How to Sleep builds on the interlocking of theory, experience and experiment so that the text itself is a lively articulation of bodies, organs and the aesthetic systems that interact with them. This book won't enhance your sleeping skills, but will give you something surprising to think about whilst being ostensibly awake.

The Dark Griffin


Author: K. J. Taylor
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101446013
Category: Fiction
Page: 384
View: 742

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Being chosen as a griffin's companion has allowed Arren Cardockson to gain a place of status within the land of Cymria. But Arren can never escape the prejudice that comes with his Northerner slave origins. For chained within the Arena where rogue griffins battle to entertain the crowds, there lies another soul crying out to be freed-a kindred spirit that will allow Arren to fulfill his destiny and release the darkness in his heart.

Super Tokyoland


Author: Benjamin Reiss
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781603094184
Category: Comics & Graphic Novels
Page: 232
View: 1338

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A perfect hybrid of European and Japanese comics and a rich exploration of the combined wonder and alienation of immigrant life. In August 2002, artist Benjamin Reiss flies to Tokyo to spend a year with Kayoko, the Japanese girl he met in France a year earlier. What he finds upon landing is a vast and complex culture, steeped in tradition but full of surprises. As one year stretches into six, Benjamin becomes immersed in the world of sento baths, taiko drums, and bento boxes, while studying cartooning under several masters of manga.

The Glass Castle

A Memoir
Author: Jeannette Walls
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1439156964
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 288
View: 4112

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The child of an alcoholic father and an eccentric artist mother discusses her family's nomadic upbringing, during which she and her siblings fended for themselves while their parents outmaneuvered bill collectors and the authorities.

The Ladies' Book of Etiquette, and Manual of Politeness

A Complete Handbook for the Use of the Lady in Polite Society ...
Author: Florence Hartley
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Etiquette
Page: 340
View: 3842

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The Ladies' Book of Etiquette, And Manual of Politeness: A Complete Handbook for the Use of the by Florence Hartley, first published in 1872, is a rare manuscript, the original residing in one of the great libraries of the world. This book is a reproduction of that original, which has been scanned and cleaned by state-of-the-art publishing tools for better readability and enhanced appreciation. Restoration Editors' mission is to bring long out of print manuscripts back to life. Some smudges, annotations or unclear text may still exist, due to permanent damage to the original work. We believe the literary significance of the text justifies offering this reproduction, allowing a new generation to appreciate it.

The Cambridge History of the American Novel


Author: Leonard Cassuto
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521899079
Category: Literary Collections
Page: 1244
View: 8983

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An authoritative and lively account of the development of the genre, by leading experts in the field.

Taming the Beast


Author: Emily Maguire
Publisher: Picador Australia
ISBN: 9781741987584
Category: Fiction
Page: 384
View: 5386

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A dazzling debut from one of Australia's most gifted young writers "Maguire keeps the prose crackling and the dialogue lively ... from the first page to the last." Publishers Weekly Sarah Clark's life is irrevocably changed at the age of 14 when her English teacher, Mr Carr, seduces her after class. Their affair is illegal, erotic, passionate and dangerous - a vicious meeting of minds and bodies. But when Mr Carr's wife discovers the affair, he has to choose between them and moves to another city with his family. Sarah is devastated and from that day on her life is defined by a series of meaningless, self-abasing sexual encounters, hoping with each man that she will experience the same delicious feelings she had with Mr Carr. Seven years later Daniel Carr walks back into Sarah's life and she is drawn once again into the destructive relationship. Is Sarah strong enough to "tame the beast"? PRAISE FOR EMILY MAGUIRE "At the heart of ... Emily Maguire's work lies an urgent need to pull away at the interconnecting threads of morality, society and human relationships." Sydney Morning Herald "what you get, along with a sharp mind and a keenness to investigate cultural confusions, is an engaging ability to put the vitality of the story first." Weekend Australian

The House at the Edge of Night

A Novel
Author: Catherine Banner
Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks
ISBN: 0812998804
Category: Fiction
Page: 448
View: 1341

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“A perfect summer read [that] brims with heart . . . Don’t be surprised if you keep turning the pages long into the night, spellbound by its magic.”—The Denver Post A sweeping saga about four generations of a family who live and love on an enchanting island off the coast of Italy—combining the romance of Beautiful Ruins with the magical tapestry of works by Isabel Allende. NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY NPR • Los Angeles Public Library • Kirkus Reviews “Captivating . . . [Catherine] Banner’s four-generation saga is set on an island near Sicily, where myths of saints get served up with limoncello at the Esposito family’s bar. . . . The island is fictional, but consider this dreamy summer read your passport.”—People “A lusty page-turner that weaves romance, rivalry and the intricacies of family expectations into one glorious tale.”—Minneapolis Star Tribune Castellamare is an island far enough away from the mainland to be forgotten, but not far enough to escape from the world’s troubles. At the center of the island’s life is a café draped with bougainvillea called the House at the Edge of Night, where the community gathers to gossip and talk. Amedeo Esposito, a foundling from Florence, finds his destiny on the island with his beautiful wife, Pina, whose fierce intelligence, grace, and unwavering love guide her every move. An indiscretion tests their marriage, and their children—three sons and an inquisitive daughter—grow up and struggle with both humanity’s cruelty and its capacity for love and mercy. Spanning nearly a century, through secrets and mysteries, trials and sacrifice, this beautiful and haunting novel follows the lives of the Esposito family and the other islanders who live and love on Castellamare: a cruel count and his bewitching wife, a priest who loves scandal, a prisoner of war turned poet, an outcast girl who becomes a pillar of strength, a wounded English soldier who emerges from the sea. The people of Castellamare are transformed by two world wars and a great recession, by the threat of fascism and their deep bonds of passion and friendship, and by bitter rivalries and the power of forgiveness. Catherine Banner has written an enthralling, character-rich novel, epic in scope but intimate in feeling. At times, the island itself seems alive, a mythical place where the earth heaves with stories—and this magical novel takes you there. Praise for The House at the Edge of Night “A gorgeous, sweeping story set over four generations . . . calls to mind Captain Corelli’s Mandolin and Beautiful Ruins.”—Interview “Like pictures of a childhood summer, or a half-forgotten smell, this book is sweet and heady with nostalgia . . . [and] comforting as a quilt.”—NPR “Rich and immersive, this book will take you away.”—Vox “A masterful piece of storytelling, infused with the miraculous (both in stories and in everyday life) while maintaining the difficult balance between the explainable versus the inexplicable . . . captivating and beautifully rendered.”—Sara Gruen, author of At the Water’s Edge

Part Wild

Caught Between the Worlds of Wolves and Dogs
Author: Ceiridwen Terrill
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 145163482X
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 304
View: 8485

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Traces the author's four-year relationship with a wolf-dog hybrid named Inyo, recounting their shared journeys in the snow, her battles with fearful neighbors, and the wolfdog's ultimate inability to be domesticated.