White Backlash

Immigration, Race, and American Politics
Author: Marisa Abrajano,Zoltan L. Hajnal
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400866480
Category: Political Science
Page: 256
View: 8579

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White Backlash provides an authoritative assessment of how immigration is reshaping the politics of the nation. Using an array of data and analysis, Marisa Abrajano and Zoltan Hajnal show that fears about immigration fundamentally influence white Americans' core political identities, policy preferences, and electoral choices, and that these concerns are at the heart of a large-scale defection of whites from the Democratic to the Republican Party. Abrajano and Hajnal demonstrate that this political backlash has disquieting implications for the future of race relations in America. White Americans' concerns about Latinos and immigration have led to support for policies that are less generous and more punitive and that conflict with the preferences of much of the immigrant population. America's growing racial and ethnic diversity is leading to a greater racial divide in politics. As whites move to the right of the political spectrum, racial and ethnic minorities generally support the left. Racial divisions in partisanship and voting, as the authors indicate, now outweigh divisions by class, age, gender, and other demographic measures. White Backlash raises critical questions and concerns about how political beliefs and future elections will change the fate of America's immigrants and minorities, and their relationship with the rest of the nation.

White Backlash

Immigration, Race, and American Politics
Author: Marisa Abrajano,Zoltan L. Hajnal
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780691164434
Category: Political Science
Page: 256
View: 5991

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""White Backlash" is one of the best books I have read in the last half century. Based on rigorous analyses of multiple data sets and presented in remarkably clear prose, the book advances a compelling and original argument that will change the way we talk about immigration and electoral politics. I highly recommend this important work to anyone seeking an understanding of the current and growing racial divide in U.S. politics."--William Julius Wilson, author of "More than Just Race" "Abrajano and Hajnal make an original and important contribution to understanding the opinions of white Americans about immigration. Using multiple sources of data, the analyses in "White Backlash" persuasively show that the politics of immigration will have long-standing consequences for U.S. democracy."--Jane Junn, University of Southern California ""White Backlash" incisively looks at how the rapid growth and negative portrayal of Latinos have sharpened racial fears, leading whites to redefine the fault lines of race in the United States. The mass immigration of Latinos has yielded a new wave of resentment increasingly skewed along partisan lines. For those wishing to understand the bitter division between Democrats and Republicans in Washington today, "White Backlash" is essential reading."--Douglas S. Massey, coauthor of "Climbing Mount Laurel" "In this ambitious, meticulously researched, and powerful book, Abrajano and Hajnal reveal the significant impact immigration has had on white political behavior and policy choices over the past three decades. This pathbreaking work will change how we think about the current partisan divide in the United States."--Lisa Garcia Bedolla, author of "Latino Politics" "In this book, Abrajano and Hajnal examine the deep and broad ways in which views on immigration have altered the partisan landscape in the United States. Relying on multiple sources, "White Backlash" makes a significant contribution to many areas in American politics, including partisanship, campaigns and elections, racial and ethnic politics, state and local politics, and political psychology."--Deborah Schildkraut, Tufts University

Debating Democracy: A Reader in American Politics


Author: Bruce Miroff,Raymond Seidelman,Todd Swanstrom
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1133171230
Category: Education
Page: 368
View: 3266

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Designed to accompany any American Government text, this engaging reader features a debate-style format that includes two readings per chapter--each representing opposing viewpoints. The unique format and current content give this book a distinct advantage over other readers. The seventh edition incorporates up-to-date chapter introductions and new debates on issues such as corporate spending in elections, same-sex marriage, and negative campaigning for a fresh look at the hot-button issues in modern American government. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Creating a New Racial Order

How Immigration, Multiracialism, Genomics, and the Young Can Remake Race in America
Author: Jennifer L. Hochschild,Vesla M. Weaver,Traci R. Burch
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400841941
Category: Political Science
Page: 280
View: 758

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The American racial order--the beliefs, institutions, and practices that organize relationships among the nation's races and ethnicities--is undergoing its greatest transformation since the 1960s. Creating a New Racial Order takes a groundbreaking look at the reasons behind this dramatic change, and considers how different groups of Americans are being affected. Through revealing narrative and striking research, the authors show that the personal and political choices of Americans will be critical to how, and how much, racial hierarchy is redefined in decades to come. The authors outline the components that make up a racial order and examine the specific mechanisms influencing group dynamics in the United States: immigration, multiracialism, genomic science, and generational change. Cumulatively, these mechanisms increase heterogeneity within each racial or ethnic group, and decrease the distance separating groups from each other. The authors show that individuals are moving across group boundaries, that genomic science is challenging the whole concept of race, and that economic variation within groups is increasing. Above all, young adults understand and practice race differently from their elders: their formative memories are 9/11, Hurricane Katrina, and Obama's election--not civil rights marches, riots, or the early stages of immigration. Blockages could stymie or distort these changes, however, so the authors point to essential policy and political choices. Portraying a vision, not of a postracial America, but of a different racial America, Creating a New Racial Order examines how the structures of race and ethnicity are altering a nation. Some images inside the book are unavailable due to digital copyright restrictions.

The Congressional Politics of Immigration Reform


Author: James G. Gimpel,James R. Edwards (Jr.)
Publisher: Allyn & Bacon
ISBN: N.A
Category: Social Science
Page: 342
View: 8129

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An account of congressional action on immigration policy since 1965 that also identifies the causes of the growing controversy over restrictions. After examining public opinion and laying out some terminology, the discussion focuses on how Congress has changed over the years and how immigration poli

White Backlash and the Politics of Multiculturalism


Author: Roger Hewitt
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781139443524
Category: Social Science
Page: N.A
View: 828

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The murder of Stephen Lawrence led to the widest review of institutional racism seen in the UK. Sections of the white working-class communities in south London near to the scene of the murder, however, displayed deep hostility to the equalities and multiculturalist practice of the local state and other agencies. Drawing on extensive ethnographic research, this book relates these phenomena to the 'backlash' to multiculturalism evident during the 1990s in the USA, Australia, Canada, the UK and other European countries. It examines these within the unfolding social and political responses to race equalities in the UK and the USA from the 1960s to the present in the context of changes in social class and national political agendas. This book is unique in linking a detailed study of a community at a time of its critical importance to national debates over racism and multiculturalism, to historically wider international economic and social trends.

Behind the Backlash

White Working-Class Politics in Baltimore, 1940-1980
Author: Kenneth D. Durr
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807862371
Category: Social Science
Page: 304
View: 9202

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In this nuanced look at white working-class life and politics in twentieth-century America, Kenneth Durr takes readers into the neighborhoods, workplaces, and community institutions of blue-collar Baltimore in the decades after World War II. Challenging notions that the "white backlash" of the 1960s and 1970s was driven by increasing race resentment, Durr details the rise of a working-class populism shaped by mistrust of the means and ends of postwar liberalism in the face of urban decline. Exploring the effects of desegregation, deindustrialization, recession, and the rise of urban crime, Durr shows how legitimate economic, social, and political grievances convinced white working-class Baltimoreans that they were threatened more by the actions of liberal policymakers than by the incursions of urban blacks. While acknowledging the parochialism and racial exclusivity of white working-class life, Durr adopts an empathetic view of workers and their institutions. Behind the Backlash melds ethnic, labor, and political history to paint a rich portrait of urban life--and the sweeping social and economic changes that reshaped America's cities and politics in the late twentieth century.

White Rage

The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide
Author: Carol Anderson
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 1632864142
Category: History
Page: 256
View: 6229

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National Book Critics Circle Award Winner New York Times Bestseller A New York Times Notable Book of the Year A Washington Post Notable Nonfiction Book of the Year A Boston Globe Best Book of 2016 A Chicago Review of Books Best Nonfiction Book of 2016 From the Civil War to our combustible present, acclaimed historian Carol Anderson reframes our continuing conversation about race, chronicling the powerful forces opposed to black progress in America. As Ferguson, Missouri, erupted in August 2014, and media commentators across the ideological spectrum referred to the angry response of African Americans as "black rage,†? historian Carol Anderson wrote a remarkable op-ed in The Washington Post suggesting that this was, instead, "white rage at work. With so much attention on the flames," she argued, "everyone had ignored the kindling." Since 1865 and the passage of the Thirteenth Amendment, every time African Americans have made advances towards full participation in our democracy, white reaction has fueled a deliberate and relentless rollback of their gains. The end of the Civil War and Reconstruction was greeted with the Black Codes and Jim Crow; the Supreme Court's landmark 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision was met with the shutting down of public schools throughout the South while taxpayer dollars financed segregated white private schools; the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965 triggered a coded but powerful response, the so-called Southern Strategy and the War on Drugs that disenfranchised millions of African Americans while propelling presidents Nixon and Reagan into the White House, and then the election of America's first black President, led to the expression of white rage that has been as relentless as it has been brutal. Carefully linking these and other historical flashpoints when social progress for African Americans was countered by deliberate and cleverly crafted opposition, Anderson pulls back the veil that has long covered actions made in the name of protecting democracy, fiscal responsibility, or protection against fraud, rendering visible the long lineage of white rage. Compelling and dramatic in the unimpeachable history it relates, White Rage will add an important new dimension to the national conversation about race in America.

Campaigning to the New American Electorate

Advertising to Latino Voters
Author: Marisa Abrajano
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 0804768951
Category: Political Science
Page: 198
View: 5112

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This is one of the first research endeavors to systematically compare the content of Spanish and English language campaign ads over an extended period of time (2000-2004) and across a variety of elections (Presidential, Congressional and Gubernatorial). Not only does it examine the way in which politicians have communicated to the nation's two largest electorates, it also looks at the impact of these ads on the political choices that Latinos make.

New Faces, New Voices

The Hispanic Electorate in America
Author: Marisa Abrajano,R. Michael Alvarez
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400834679
Category: Social Science
Page: 232
View: 8836

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Making up 14.2 percent of the American population, Hispanics are now the largest minority group in the United States. Clearly, securing the Hispanic vote is more important to political parties than ever before. Yet, despite the current size of the Hispanic population, is there a clear Hispanic politics? Who are Hispanic voters? What are their political preferences and attitudes, and why? The first comprehensive study of Hispanic voters in the United States, New Faces, New Voices paints a complex portrait of this diverse and growing population. Examining race, politics, and comparative political behavior, Marisa Abrajano and R. Michael Alvarez counter the preconceived notion of Hispanic voters as one homogenous group. The authors discuss the concept of Hispanic political identity, taking into account the ethnic, generational, and linguistic distinctions within the Hispanic population. They compare Hispanic registration, turnout, and participation to those of non-Hispanics, consider the socioeconomic factors contributing to Hispanics' levels of political knowledge, determine what segment of the Hispanic population votes in federal elections, and explore the prospects for political relationships among Hispanics and non-Hispanics. Finally, the authors look at Hispanic opinions on social and economic issues, factoring in whether these attitudes are affected by generational status and ethnicity. A unique and nuanced perspective on the Hispanic electoral population, New Faces, New Voices is essential for understanding the political characteristics of the largest and fastest growing group of minority voters in the United States.

Us Against Them

Ethnocentric Foundations of American Opinion
Author: Donald R. Kinder,Cindy D. Kam
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226435725
Category: Social Science
Page: 368
View: 4719

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Ethnocentrism—our tendency to partition the human world into in-groups and out-groups—pervades societies around the world. Surprisingly, though, few scholars have explored its role in political life. Donald Kinder and Cindy Kam fill this gap with Us Against Them, their definitive explanation of how ethnocentrism shapes American public opinion. Arguing that humans are broadly predisposed to ethnocentrism, Kinder and Kam explore its impact on our attitudes toward an array of issues, including the war on terror, humanitarian assistance, immigration, the sanctity of marriage, and the reform of social programs. The authors ground their study in previous theories from a wide range of disciplines, establishing a new framework for understanding what ethnocentrism is and how it becomes politically consequential. They also marshal a vast trove of survey evidence to identify the conditions under which ethnocentrism shapes public opinion. While ethnocentrism is widespread in the United States, the authors demonstrate that its political relevance depends on circumstance. Exploring the implications of these findings for political knowledge, cosmopolitanism, and societies outside the United States, Kinder and Kam add a new dimension to our understanding of how democracy functions.

The Politics of Immigration

Partisanship, Changing Demographics, and the American National Identity
Author: Tom K. Wong
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190235306
Category:
Page: 264
View: 2347

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Immigration has been deeply woven into the fabric of American nation building since the founding of the Republic. Indeed, immigrants have played an integral role in American history, but they are also intricately tied to America's present and will feature prominently in America's future. Immigration can shape a nation. Consequently, immigration policy can maintain, replenish, and even reshape it. Immigration policy debates are thus seldom just about who to let in and how many, as a nation's immigration policies can define its identity. This is what helps breathe fire into the politics of immigration. Against this backdrop, political parties promote their own narratives about what the immigration policies of a nation of immigrants should be while undermining the contrasting narratives of political opponents. Racial and ethnic groups mobilize for political inclusion as immigration increases their numbers, but are often confronted by the counteractive mobilization of nativist groups. Legislators calibrate their positions on immigration by weighing traditional electoral concerns against a new demographic normal that is reshaping the American electorate. At stake are not just what our immigration policies will be, but also what America can become. What are the determinants of immigration policymaking in the United States? The Politics of Immigration focuses the analytical lens on the electoral incentives that legislators in Congress have to support or oppose immigration policy reforms at the federal level. In contrast to previous arguments, Tom K. Wong argues that contemporary immigration politics in the United States can be characterized by three underlying features: the entrenchment of partisan divides among legislators on the issue of immigration, the political implications of the demographic changes that are reshaping the American electorate, and how these changes are creating new opportunities to define what it means to be an American in a period of unprecedented national origins, racial and ethnic, and cultural diversity.

Unspoken Politics

Implicit Attitudes and Political Thinking
Author: Efrén O. Pérez
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107133734
Category: Philosophy
Page: 228
View: 7895

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This book offers a comprehensive look at the conceptualization, measurement, and political impacts of implicit attitudes.

The Politics of Resentment

Rural Consciousness in Wisconsin and the Rise of Scott Walker
Author: Katherine J. Cramer
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022634925X
Category: Political Science
Page: 256
View: 5434

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Since the election of Scott Walker, Wisconsin has been seen as ground zero for debates about the appropriate role of government in the wake of the Great Recession. In a time of rising inequality, Walker not only survived a bitterly contested recall that brought thousands of protesters to Capitol Square, he was subsequently reelected. How could this happen? How is it that the very people who stand to benefit from strong government services not only vote against the candidates who support those services but are vehemently against the very idea of big government? With The Politics of Resentment, Katherine J. Cramer uncovers an oft-overlooked piece of the puzzle: rural political consciousness and the resentment of the “liberal elite.” Rural voters are distrustful that politicians will respect the distinct values of their communities and allocate a fair share of resources. What can look like disagreements about basic political principles are therefore actually rooted in something even more fundamental: who we are as people and how closely a candidate’s social identity matches our own. Using Scott Walker and Wisconsin’s prominent and protracted debate about the appropriate role of government, Cramer illuminates the contours of rural consciousness, showing how place-based identities profoundly influence how people understand politics, regardless of whether urban politicians and their supporters really do shortchange or look down on those living in the country. The Politics of Resentment shows that rural resentment—no less than partisanship, race, or class—plays a major role in dividing America against itself.

Framing Immigrants

News Coverage, Public Opinion, and Policy
Author: Chris Haynes,Jennifer Merolla,S. Karthick Ramakrishnan
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
ISBN: 161044860X
Category: Social Science
Page: 240
View: 4611

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While undocumented immigration is controversial, the general public is largely unfamiliar with the particulars of immigration policy. Given that public opinion on the topic is malleable, to what extent do mass media shape the public debate on immigration? In Framing Immigrants, political scientists Chris Haynes, Jennifer Merolla, and Karthick Ramakrishnan explore how conservative, liberal, and mainstream news outlets frame and discuss undocumented immigrants. Drawing from original voter surveys, they show that how the media frames immigration has significant consequences for public opinion and has implications for the passage of new immigration policies. The authors analyze media coverage of several key immigration policy issues—including mass deportations, comprehensive immigration reform, and measures focused on immigrant children, such as the DREAM Act—to chart how news sources across the ideological spectrum produce specific “frames” for the immigration debate. In the past few years, liberal and mainstream outlets have tended to frame immigrants lacking legal status as “undocumented” (rather than “illegal”) and to approach the topic of legalization through human-interest stories, often mentioning children. Conservative outlets, on the other hand, tend to discuss legalization using impersonal statistics and invoking the rule of law. Yet, regardless of the media’s ideological positions, the authors’ surveys show that “negative” frames more strongly influence public support for different immigration policies than do positive frames. For instance, survey participants who were exposed to language portraying immigrants as law-breakers seeking “amnesty” tended to oppose legalization measures. At the same time, support for legalization was higher when participants were exposed to language referring to immigrants living in the United States for a decade or more. Framing Immigrants shows that despite heated debates on immigration across the political aisle, the general public has yet to form a consistent position on undocumented immigrants. By analyzing how the media influences public opinion, this book provides a valuable resource for immigration advocates, policymakers, and researchers.

Mexican Americans and the Question of Race


Author: Julie A. Dowling
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 0292754019
Category: Social Science
Page: 173
View: 3308

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Honorable Mention, Oliver Cromwell Cox Book Award, presented by the Racial and Ethnic Minorities Section of the American Sociological Association, 2015 With Mexican Americans constituting a large and growing segment of U.S. society, their assimilation trajectory has become a constant source of debate. Some believe Mexican Americans are following the path of European immigrants toward full assimilation into whiteness, while others argue that they remain racialized as nonwhite. Drawing on extensive interviews with Mexican Americans and Mexican immigrants in Texas, Dowling's research challenges common assumptions about what informs racial labeling for this population. Her interviews demonstrate that for Mexican Americans, racial ideology is key to how they assert their identities as either in or outside the bounds of whiteness. Emphasizing the link between racial ideology and racial identification, Dowling offers an insightful narrative that highlights the complex and highly contingent nature of racial identity.

Post-Racial or Most-Racial?

Race and Politics in the Obama Era
Author: Michael Tesler
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 022635315X
Category: Political Science
Page: 272
View: 7881

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When Barack Obama won the presidency, many posited that we were entering into a post-racial period in American politics. Regrettably, the reality hasn’t lived up to that expectation. Instead, Americans’ political beliefs have become significantly more polarized by racial considerations than they had been before Obama’s presidency—in spite of his administration’s considerable efforts to neutralize the political impact of race. Michael Tesler shows how, in the years that followed the 2008 election—a presidential election more polarized by racial attitudes than any other in modern times—racial considerations have come increasingly to influence many aspects of political decision making. These range from people’s evaluations of prominent politicians and the parties to issues seemingly unrelated to race like assessments of public policy or objective economic conditions. Some people even displayed more positive feelings toward Obama’s dog, Bo, when they were told he belonged to Ted Kennedy. More broadly, Tesler argues that the rapidly intensifying influence of race in American politics is driving the polarizing partisan divide and the vitriolic atmosphere that has come to characterize American politics. One of the most important books on American racial politics in recent years, Post-Racial or Most-Racial? is required reading for anyone wishing to understand what has happened in the United States during Obama’s presidency and how it might shape the country long after he leaves office.

Changing White Attitudes toward Black Political Leadership


Author: Zoltan L. Hajnal
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139462423
Category: Political Science
Page: N.A
View: 9833

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Despite the hopes of the civil rights movement, researchers have found that the election of African Americans to office has not greatly improved the well-being of the black community. By shifting the focus to the white community, this book shows that black representation can have a profound impact. Utilizing national public opinion surveys, data on voting patterns in large American cities, and in-depth studies of Los Angeles and Chicago, Zoltan Hajnal demonstrates that under most black mayors there is real, positive change in the white vote and in the racial attitudes of white residents. This change occurs because black incumbency provides concrete information that disproves the fears and expectations of many white residents. These findings not only highlight the importance of black representation; they also demonstrate the critical role that information can play in racial politics to the point where black representation can profoundly alter white views and white votes.