Weimar Publics/weimar Subjects

Rethinking the Political Culture of Germany in the 1920s
Author: Kathleen Canning,Kerstin Barndt,Kristin McGuire
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 1782381082
Category: History
Page: 420
View: 3272

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In spite of having been short-lived, “Weimar” has never lost its fascination. Until recently the Weimar Republic’s place in German history was primarily defined by its catastrophic beginning and end - Germany’s defeat in 1918 and the Nazi seizure of power in 1933; its history seen mainly in terms of politics and as an arena of flawed decisions and failed compromises. However, a flourishing of interdisciplinary scholarship on Weimar political culture is uncovering arenas of conflict and change that had not been studied closely before, such as gender, body politics, masculinity, citizenship, empire and borderlands, visual culture, popular culture and consumption. This collection offers new perspectives from leading scholars in the disciplines of history, art history, film studies, and German studies on the vibrant political culture of Germany in the 1920s. From the traumatic ruptures of defeat, revolution, and collapse of the Kaiser’s state, the visionaries of Weimar went on to invent a republic, calling forth new citizens and cultural innovations that shaped the republic far beyond the realms of parliaments and political parties.

Weimar Germany

Promise and Tragedy, Weimar Centennial Edition
Author: Eric D. Weitz
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691184356
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 7646

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Thoroughly up-to-date, skillfully written, and strikingly illustrated, Weimar Germany brings to life an era of unmatched creativity in the twentieth century—one whose influence and inspiration still resonate today. Eric Weitz has written the authoritative history that this fascinating and complex period deserves, and he illuminates the uniquely progressive achievements and even greater promise of the Weimar Republic. Weitz reveals how Germans rose from the turbulence and defeat of World War I and revolution to forge democratic institutions and make Berlin a world capital of avant-garde art. He explores the period’s groundbreaking cultural creativity, from architecture and theater, to the new field of "sexology"—and presents richly detailed portraits of some of the Weimar’s greatest figures. Weimar Germany also shows that beneath this glossy veneer lay political turmoil that ultimately led to the demise of the republic and the rise of the radical Right. Yet for decades after, the Weimar period continued to powerfully influence contemporary art, urban design, and intellectual life—from Tokyo to Ankara, and Brasilia to New York. Featuring a new preface, this comprehensive and compelling book demonstrates why Weimar is an example of all that is liberating and all that can go wrong in a democracy.

Weimar Culture Revisited


Author: J. Williams
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230117252
Category: History
Page: 235
View: 9767

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Weimar Culture Revisited is the first book to offer an accessible cross-section of new cultural history approaches to the Weimar Republic. This collection uses an interdisciplinary approach and focuses on the everyday workings of Weimar culture to explain the impact and meaning of culture for German's everyday lives during this fateful era.

Crime Stories

Criminalistic Fantasy and the Culture of Crisis in Weimar Germany
Author: Todd Herzog
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 9781845454395
Category: History
Page: 169
View: 2100

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The Weimar Republic (1918-1933) was a crucial moment not only in German history but also in the history of both crime fiction and criminal science. This study approaches the period from a unique perspective - investigating the most notorious criminals of the time and the public's reaction to their crimes. The author argues that the development of a new type of crime fiction during this period - which turned literary tradition on its head by focusing on the criminal and abandoning faith in the powers of the rational detective - is intricately related to new ways of understanding criminality among professionals in the fields of law, criminology, and police science. Considering Weimar Germany not only as a culture in crisis (the standard view in both popular and scholarly studies), but also as a culture of crisis, the author explores the ways in which crime and crisis became the foundation of the Republic's self-definition. An interdisciplinary cultural studies project, this book insightfully combines history, sociology, literary studies, and film studies to investigate a topic that cuts across all of these disciplines.

Jews in Weimar Germany


Author: Donald L. Niewyk
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351303627
Category: History
Page: 229
View: 1115

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The first comprehensive history of the German Jews on the eve of Hitler's seizure of power, this book examines both their internal debates and their relations with larger German society. It shows that, far from being united, German Jewry was deeply divided along religious, political, and ideological fault lines. Above all, the liberal majority of patriotic and assimilationist Jews was forced to sharpen its self-definition by the onslaught of Zionist zealots who denied the "Germanness" of the Jews. This struggle for the heart and soul of German Jewry was fought at every level, affecting families, synagogues, and community institutions.Although the Jewish role in Germany's economy and culture was exaggerated, they were certainly prominent in many fields, giving rise to charges of privilege and domination. This volume probes the texture of German anti-Semitism, distinguishing between traditional and radical Judeophobia and reaching conclusions that will give no comfort to those who assume that Germans were predisposed to become "willing executioners" under Hitler. It also assesses the quality of Jewish responses to racist attacks. The self-defense campaigns of the Central Association of German Citizens of the Jewish Faith included publishing counter-propaganda, supporting sympathetic political parties, and taking anti-Semitic demagogues to court. Although these measures could only slow the rise of Nazism after 1930, they demonstrate that German Jewry was anything but passive in its responses to the fascist challenge.The German Jews' faith in liberalism is sometimes attributed to self-delusion and wishful thinking. This volume argues that, in fact, German Jewry pursued a clear-sighted perception of Jewish self-interest, apprehended the dangers confronting it, and found allies in socialist and democratic elements that constituted the "other Germany." Sadly, this profound and genuine commitment to liberalism left the German Jews increasingly isolated as the majority of Germans turned to political radicalism in the last years of the Republic. This full-scale history of Weimar Jewry will be of interest to professors, students, and general readers interested in the Holocaust and Jewish History.

Cultures of Abortion in Weimar Germany


Author: Cornelie Usborne
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 9781845453893
Category: History
Page: 284
View: 5542

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Based on an exceptionally rich source material, this study explores different attitudes and experiences of those women who sought to terminate an unwanted pregnancy in the Weimar Republic and those who helped or hindered them.

Lustmord

Sexual Murder in Weimar Germany
Author: Maria Tatar
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691015903
Category: History
Page: 213
View: 9554

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In a book that confronts our society's obsession with sexual violence and the image of the violated female corpse in our collective consciousness, Harvard culturist Maria Tatar examines images of sexual murder and studies how art and murder have intersected in sexual culture from Weimar Germany to the present. 44 photos.

The Politics of Education

Teachers and School Reform in Weimar Germany
Author: Marjorie Lamberti
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 1571812997
Category: History
Page: 272
View: 4692

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Although the early history of progressive education is often associated with John Dewey in America, the author argues convincingly that the pedagogues in the elementary schools in the big cities of Imperial Germany were in the avant garde of this movement on the European Continent. Far more than a history of ideas, this study provides the first comprehensive analysis of the culture wars over the schools in Germany in the 1920s. Going up to the Nazi seizure of power, the author's narrative sheds new light on the courageous defense of the republican state by the progressive educators in the 1930s and the relationship between the traditionalists' opposition to school reform and the attraction of certain sections of the teaching profession to the Nazi movement.

Women in the Weimar Republic


Author: Helen Boak
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 1526101610
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 656

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The first comprehensive survey of women in the Weimar Republic, this book explores the diversity and multiplicity of women's experiences in the economy, politics and society. These fourteen years of political, economic and cultural turbulence marked great changes in the lives, expectations and perceptions of German women, in the form of new opportunities in employment, education and political life and greater social freedoms, all played out in the media spotlight. Drawing heavily on archival and primary source material, and engaging throughout with the most recent research, this book examines these changes, opportunities, expectations, perceptions, prejudices and the media and cultural representations of the 'new woman' within a single, coherent analysis of women's role. As a starting point, the book discusses the significance of women's experiences in the First World War for their subsequent position in Weimar Germany, before detailing the contribution to political life and culture that was formally opened to them by the revolution. Subsequent chapters explore women's role in employment, the family and reproduction, and as producers and consumers of Weimar's mass culture. It portrays the Weimar Republic as a progressive period for young, urban women, which was stalled in 1933. This book will be essential reading for students and researchers of German women in the early twentieth century and will also appeal to anyone interested in the Weimar Republic and women's history.

The Many Faces of Weimar Cinema

Rediscovering Germany's Filmic Legacy
Author: Christian Rogowski
Publisher: Camden House
ISBN: 1571134298
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 354
View: 7906

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New essays re-evaluating Weimar cinema from a broadened, up-to-date perspective.

Shell Shock Cinema

Weimar Culture and the Wounds of War
Author: Anton Kaes
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691008507
Category: Art
Page: 328
View: 1680

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Shell Shock Cinema explores how the classical German cinema of the Weimar Republic was haunted by the horrors of World War I and the the devastating effects of the nation's defeat. In this exciting new book, Anton Kaes argues that masterworks such as The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari, Nosferatu, The Nibelungen, and Metropolis, even though they do not depict battle scenes or soldiers in combat, engaged the war and registered its tragic aftermath. These films reveal a wounded nation in post-traumatic shock, reeling from a devastating defeat that it never officially acknowledged, let alone accepted. Kaes uses the term "shell shock"--coined during World War I to describe soldiers suffering from nervous breakdowns--as a metaphor for the psychological wounds that found expression in Weimar cinema. Directors like Robert Wiene, F. W. Murnau, and Fritz Lang portrayed paranoia, panic, and fear of invasion in films peopled with serial killers, mad scientists, and troubled young men. Combining original close textual analysis with extensive archival research, Kaes shows how this post-traumatic cinema of shell shock transformed extreme psychological states into visual expression; how it pushed the limits of cinematic representation with its fragmented story lines, distorted perspectives, and stark lighting; and how it helped create a modernist film language that anticipated film noir and remains incredibly influential today. A compelling contribution to the cultural history of trauma, Shell Shock Cinema exposes how German film gave expression to the loss and acute grief that lay behind Weimar's sleek façade.

Women in Weimar Fashion

Discourses and Displays in German Culture, 1918-1933
Author: Mila Ganeva
Publisher: Camden House
ISBN: 1571132058
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 240
View: 8061

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New view of the crucial role of fashion discourse and practice in Weimar Germany and its significance for women.

The Weimar Century

German Emigres and the Ideological Foundations of the Cold War
Author: Udi Greenberg
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400852390
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 8369

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The Weimar Century reveals the origins of two dramatic events: Germany's post–World War II transformation from a racist dictatorship to a liberal democracy, and the ideological genesis of the Cold War. Blending intellectual, political, and international histories, Udi Greenberg shows that the foundations of Germany’s reconstruction lay in the country’s first democratic experiment, the Weimar Republic (1918–33). He traces the paths of five crucial German émigrés who participated in Weimar’s intense political debates, spent the Nazi era in the United States, and then rebuilt Europe after a devastating war. Examining the unexpected stories of these diverse individuals—Protestant political thinker Carl J. Friedrich, Socialist theorist Ernst Fraenkel, Catholic publicist Waldemar Gurian, liberal lawyer Karl Loewenstein, and international relations theorist Hans Morgenthau—Greenberg uncovers the intellectual and political forces that forged Germany’s democracy after dictatorship, war, and occupation. In restructuring German thought and politics, these émigrés also shaped the currents of the early Cold War. Having borne witness to Weimar’s political clashes and violent upheavals, they called on democratic regimes to permanently mobilize their citizens and resources in global struggle against their Communist enemies. In the process, they gained entry to the highest levels of American power, serving as top-level advisors to American occupation authorities in Germany and Korea, consultants for the State Department in Latin America, and leaders in universities and philanthropic foundations across Europe and the United States. Their ideas became integral to American global hegemony. From interwar Germany to the dawn of the American century, The Weimar Century sheds light on the crucial ideas, individuals, and politics that made the trans-Atlantic postwar order.

German Modernities From Wilhelm to Weimar

A Contest of Futures
Author: Geoff Eley,Jennifer L. Jenkins,Tracie Matysik
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1474216307
Category: History
Page: 376
View: 5073

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What was German modernity? What did the years between 1880 and 1930 mean for Germany's navigation through a period of global capitalism, imperial expansion, and technological transformation? German Modernities From Wilhelm to Weimar brings together leading historians of the Imperial and Weimar periods from across North America to readdress the question of German modernities. Acutely attentive to Germany's eventual turn towards National Socialism and the related historiographical arguments about 'modernity', this volume explores the variety of social, intellectual, political, and imperial projects pursued by those living in Germany in the Wilhelmine and Weimar years who were yet uncertain about what they were creating and which future would come. It includes varied case studies, based on cutting-edge research, which rethink the relationship of the early 20th century to the rise of Nazism and the Third Reich. A range of political, social and cultural issues, including citizenship, welfare, empire, aesthetics and sexuality, as well as the very nature of German modernity, are analyzed and placed in a global context. German Modernities From Wilhelm to Weimar is a book of vital significance to all students of modern German history seeking to further understand the complex period from 1880 to 1930.

Sex and the Weimar Republic

German Homosexual Emancipation and the Rise of the Nazis
Author: Laurie Marhoefer
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442626577
Category: POLITICAL SCIENCE
Page: 340
View: 6884

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Sex and the Weimar Republic shows how, in Weimar Germany, the citizen's right to sexual freedom came with a duty to keep sexuality private, non-commercial, and respectable.

Women in the Weimar Republic


Author: Helen Boak
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 1526101629
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 7975

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The first comprehensive survey of women in the Weimar Republic, this book explores the diversity and multiplicity of women's experiences in the economy, politics and society. These fourteen years of political, economic and cultural turbulence marked great changes in the lives, expectations and perceptions of German women, in the form of new opportunities in employment, education and political life and greater social freedoms, all played out in the media spotlight. Drawing heavily on archival and primary source material, and engaging throughout with the most recent research, this book examines these changes, opportunities, expectations, perceptions, prejudices and the media and cultural representations of the 'new woman' within a single, coherent analysis of women's role. As a starting point, the book discusses the significance of women's experiences in the First World War for their subsequent position in Weimar Germany, before detailing the contribution to political life and culture that was formally opened to them by the revolution. Subsequent chapters explore women's role in employment, the family and reproduction, and as producers and consumers of Weimar's mass culture. It portrays the Weimar Republic as a progressive period for young, urban women, which was stalled in 1933. This book will be essential reading for students and researchers of German women in the early twentieth century and will also appeal to anyone interested in the Weimar Republic and women's history.

A Short History of the Weimar Republic


Author: Colin Storer
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 0857733559
Category: History
Page: 256
View: 5971

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It is impossible to understand the history of modern Europe without some knowledge of the Weimar Republic. The brief fourteen-year period of democracy between the Treaty of Versailles and the advent of the Third Reich was marked by unstable government, economic crisis and hyperinflation and the rise of extremist political movements. At the same time, however, a vibrant cultural scene flourished, which continues to influence the international art world through the aesthetics of Expressionism and the Bauhaus movement. In the fields of art, literature, theatre, cinema, music and architecture – not to mention science – Germany became a world leader during the 1920s, while her perilous political and economic position ensured that no US or European statesman could afford to ignore her. Incorporating original research and a synthesis of the existing historiography, this book will provide students and a general readership with a clear and concise introduction to the history of the first German Republic.

The Weimar Republic Sourcebook


Author: Anton Kaes,Martin Jay,Edward Dimendberg
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520067754
Category: History
Page: 806
View: 5434

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Sourcebook on the Weimar Republic.

Walther Rathenau

Weimar's Fallen Statesman
Author: Shulamit Volkov
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300144318
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 256
View: 1305

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This deeply informed biography of Walther Rathenau (1867-1922) tells of a man who—both thoroughly German and unabashedly Jewish—rose to leadership in the German War-Ministry Department during the First World War, and later to the exalted position of foreign minister in the early days of the Weimar Republic. His achievement was unprecedented—no Jew in Germany had ever attained such high political rank. But Rathenau's success was marked by tragedy: within months he was assassinated by right-wing extremists seeking to destroy the newly formed Republic. Drawing on Rathenau's papers and on a depth of knowledge of both modern German and German-Jewish history, Shulamit Volkov creates a finely drawn portrait of this complex man who struggled with his Jewish identity yet treasured his “otherness.” Volkov also places Rathenau in the dual context of Imperial and Weimar Germany and of Berlin's financial and intellectual elite. Above all, she illuminates the complex social and psychological milieu of German Jewry in the period before Hitler's rise to power.

The Death of Democracy

Hitler's Rise to Power and the Downfall of the Weimar Republic
Author: Benjamin Carter Hett
Publisher: Henry Holt and Company
ISBN: 1250162513
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 8720

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A riveting account of how the Nazi Party came to power and how the failures of the Weimar Republic and the shortsightedness of German politicians allowed it to happen. Why did democracy fall apart so quickly and completely in Germany in the 1930s? How did a democratic government allow Adolf Hitler to seize power? In The Death of Democracy, Benjamin Carter Hett answers these questions, and the story he tells has disturbing resonances for our own time. To say that Hitler was elected is too simple. He would never have come to power if Germany’s leading politicians had not responded to a spate of populist insurgencies by trying to co-opt him, a strategy that backed them into a corner from which the only way out was to bring the Nazis in. Hett lays bare the misguided confidence of conservative politicians who believed that Hitler and his followers would willingly support them, not recognizing that their efforts to use the Nazis actually played into Hitler’s hands. They had willingly given him the tools to turn Germany into a vicious dictatorship. Benjamin Carter Hett is a leading scholar of twentieth-century Germany and a gifted storyteller whose portraits of these feckless politicians show how fragile democracy can be when those in power do not respect it. He offers a powerful lesson for today, when democracy once again finds itself embattled and the siren song of strongmen sounds ever louder.