Wealth And Poverty Of Nations


Author: David S. Landes
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 0349141444
Category: Social Science
Page: 672
View: 2385

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The history of nations is a history of haves and have-nots, and as we approach the millennium, the gap between rich and poor countries is widening. In this engrossing and important new work, eminent historian David Landes explores the complex, fascinating and often startling causes of the wealth and poverty of nations. The answers are found not only in the large forces at work in economies: geography, religion, the broad swings of politics, but also in the small surprising details. In Europe, the invention of spectacles doubled the working life of skilled craftsmen, and played a prominent role in the creation of articulated machines, and in China, the failure to adopt the clock fundamentally hindered economic development. The relief of poverty is vital to the survival of us all. As David Landes brilliantly shows, the key to future success lies in understanding the lessons the past has to teach us - lessons uniquely imparted in this groundbreaking and vital book which exemplifies narrative history at its best.

The Wealth and Poverty of Nations

Why Some are So Rich and Some So Poor
Author: David S. Landes
Publisher: W W Norton & Company Incorporated
ISBN: 9780393318883
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 658
View: 8899

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A study of the world's growing gulf between rich and poor explains why Western European nations have been the wealthiest, prospering through open societies, new technologies, and the pursuit of change

The Wealth and Poverty of Nations: Why Some Are So Rich and Some So Poor


Author: David S. Landes
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393069815
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 672
View: 5974

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"Readers cannot but be provoked and stimulated by this splendidly iconoclastic and refreshing book."—Andrew Porter, New York Times Book Review The Wealth and Poverty of Nations is David S. Landes's acclaimed, best-selling exploration of one of the most contentious and hotly debated questions of our time: Why do some nations achieve economic success while others remain mired in poverty? The answer, as Landes definitively illustrates, is a complex interplay of cultural mores and historical circumstance. Rich with anecdotal evidence, piercing analysis, and a truly astonishing range of erudition, The Wealth and Poverty of Nations is a "picture of enormous sweep and brilliant insight" (Kenneth Arrow) as well as one of the most audaciously ambitious works of history in decades. For the paperback edition, Landes has written a new epilogue, in which he takes account of Asian financial crisises and the international tension between overconfidence and reality.

A Short Treatise on the Wealth and Poverty of Nations (1613)


Author: Antonio Serra,Sophus A. Reinert
Publisher: Anthem Press
ISBN: 085728973X
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 260
View: 2926

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Although no less an authority than Joseph A. Schumpeter proclaimed that Antonio Serra was the world's first economist, he remains something of a dark horse of economic historiography. Nearly nothing is known about Serra except that he wrote and died in jail, and his Short Treatise is so rare that only nine original copies are known to have survived the ravages of time. What, then, can a book written nearly four centuries ago tell us about the problems we now face? Serra's key insight, studying the economies of Venice and Naples, was that wealth was not the result of climate or providence but of policies and strategies for competitively developing some economic activities rather than others, particularly manufactures, subject to increasing returns to scale and a large division of labour. Through a very systematic taxonomy of economic life, Serra then went on from this insight to theorize the causes of the wealth of nations and the measures through which a weak, dependent economy could achieve worldly melioration. At a time when leading economists return to biological explanations for the failure of their theories, the Short Treatise can remind us that there are elements of history which numbers and graphs cannot convey or encompass, and that there are less despondent lessons to be learned from our past. Serra's remarkable treatise is introduced by a lengthy and illuminating study of his historical context and legacy for the theoretical and cultural history of economics and for the economic strategies of nations.

The Poverty of Nations

A Sustainable Solution
Author: Wayne Grudem,Barry Asmus
Publisher: Crossway
ISBN: 143353911X
Category: Religion
Page: 398
View: 670

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We can win the fight against global poverty. Combining penetrating economic analysis with insightful theological reflection, this book sketches a comprehensive plan for increasing wealth and protecting stability at a national level.

Why Nations Fail

The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty
Author: Daron Acemoglu,James A. Robinson
Publisher: Crown Books
ISBN: 0307719227
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 529
View: 3366

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An award-winning professor of economics at MIT and a Harvard University political scientist and economist evaluate the reasons that some nations are poor while others succeed, outlining provocative perspectives that support theories about the importance of institutions. Reprint.

The Wealth of the World and the Poverty of Nations


Author: Daniel Cohen
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 9780262032537
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 136
View: 2336

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"Globalization" has become a loaded term. Should we in the West believe, literally, that trade with poor nations can be blamed for our "impoverishment"? In this book, Daniel Cohen claims that there is practically no foundation for such an alarmist position. We need to reverse the commonly held view that globalization has caused today's insecure labor market. On the contrary, Cohen argues, our own propensity for transforming the nature of work has created a niche for globalization and given it an ominous aspect, causing some to reject it. Such errors in analysis must not persist; as Cohen says, the stakes are too high.

Development Economics

From the Poverty to the Wealth of Nations
Author: Yujiro Hayami,Yoshihisa Godo
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199272709
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 430
View: 7127

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Presbyterian minister John Witherspoon was a key figure, politically and religiously, in the formative years of the United States. In this fresh account of Witherspoon's thought, L. Gordon Tait focuses on Witherspoon's piety--the way Witherspoon believed that the Christian faith should take visible and practical form in ministry, politics, and everyday obedience and devotion.The Piety of John Witherspoonis filled with photographs from Witherspoon's life, and Tait's comprehensive treatment of Witherspoon makes a significant contribution to the understanding of his impact on church, education, and society.

IQ and the Wealth of Nations


Author: Richard Lynn,Tatu Vanhanen
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780275975104
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 298
View: 9496

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Lynn and Vanhanen argue that a significant part of the gap between rich and poor countries is due to differences in national intelligence (national IQs). Based on an extensive survey of national IQ tests, the results of their study challenge the previous theories of economic development and provide a new basis to evaluate the prospects of economic development throughout the world.

Wealth and Poverty

A New Edition for the Twenty-First Century
Author: George Gilder
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1596988169
Category: Social Science
Page: 256
View: 6086

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Hailed as “the guide to capitalism,” the New York Times bestseller Wealth and Poverty by George F. Gilder is one of the most famous economic books of all time and has sold more than one million copies since its first release. In this influential classic, Gilder explains and makes the case for supply-side economics, proves the moral superiority of free-market capitalism, and shows why supply-side economics are more effective at decreasing poverty than government-regulated markets. Now, in this new and completely updated edition of Wealth and Poverty, Gilder compares America’s current economic challenges with her past economic problems–particularly those of the late 1970s–and explains why Obama’s big-government, redistributive policies are doing more harm than good for the poor. Making the case that supply-side economics and free market policies are–and always will be–the answer to decreasing America’s poverty rate and increasing her prosperity, Wealth & Poverty offers solutions to America’s current economic problems and hope to those who fear that our best days are behind us.

The Wealth and Poverty of Regions

Why Cities Matter
Author: Mario Polèse
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226673172
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 288
View: 3841

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As the world becomes more interconnected through travel and electronic communication, many believe that physical places will become less important. But as Mario Polèse argues in The Wealth and Poverty of Regions, geography will matter more than ever before in a world where distance is allegedly dead. This provocative book surveys the globe, from London and Cape Town to New York and Beijing, contending that regions rise—or fall—due to their location, not only within nations but also on the world map. Polèse reveals how concentrations of industries and populations in specific locales often result in minor advantages that accumulate over time, resulting in reduced prices, improved transportation networks, increased diversity, and not least of all, “buzz”—the excitement and vitality that attracts ambitious people. The Wealth and Poverty of Regions maps out how a heady mix of size, infrastructure, proximity, and cost will determine which urban centers become the thriving metropolises of the future, and which become the deserted cities of the past. Engagingly written, the book provides insight to the past, present, and future of regions.

Poverty From The Wealth of Nations

Integration and Polarization in the Global Economy since 1760
Author: M. Alam
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0333985648
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 215
View: 9118

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In Poverty from the Wealth of Nations , the author presents an analysis of the evolution of global disparities that goes beyond the earlier neo-Marxist critiques of global capitalism. He moves beyond their narrative by inserting two additional asymmetries into the global economy - those created by 'unequal races' and unequal states. The author analyzes not only the power of markets, but the powers that shaped these markets. More importantly, he marshals cross-country evidence to show that loss of sovereignty retarded industrialization, human capital formation and economic growth.

The Growth Delusion

Wealth, Poverty, and the Well-Being of Nations
Author: David Pilling
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 0525572503
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 304
View: 6955

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A provocative critique of the pieties and fallacies of our obsession with economic growth We live in a society in which a priesthood of economists, wielding impenetrable mathematical formulas, set the framework for public debate. Ultimately, it is the perceived health of the economy which determines how much we can spend on our schools, highways, and defense; economists decide how much unemployment is acceptable and whether it is right to print money or bail out profligate banks. The backlash we are currently witnessing suggests that people are turning against the experts and their faulty understanding of our lives. Despite decades of steady economic growth, many citizens feel more pessimistic than ever, and are voting for candidates who voice undisguised contempt for the technocratic elite. For too long, economics has relied on a language which fails to resonate with people's actual experience, and we are now living with the consequences. In this powerful, incisive book, David Pilling reveals the hidden biases of economic orthodoxy and explores the alternatives to GDP, from measures of wealth, equality, and sustainability to measures of subjective wellbeing. Authoritative, provocative, and eye-opening, The Growth Delusion offers witty and unexpected insights into how our society can respond to the needs of real people instead of pursuing growth at any cost.

Dynasties

Fortunes and Misfortunes of the World's Great Family Businesses
Author: David S. Landes
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101650907
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 400
View: 690

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From the author of the New York Times bestseller The Wealth and Poverty of Nations, a fascinating look at the crossroads of kin and coin David S. Landes has earned a reputation as a brilliant writer and iconoclast among economic historians. In his latest acclaimed work, he takes a revealing look at the quality that distinguishes a third of today's Fortune 500 companies: family ownership. From the banking fortunes of Rothschild and Morgan to the automobile empires of Ford and Toyota, Landes explores thirteen different dynasties, revealing what lay behind their successes-and how extravagance, bad behavior, and poor enterprise brought some of them to their knees. A colorful history that is full of surprising conclusions, Dynasties is an engrossing mix of ambition, eccentricity, and wealth.

The Changing Wealth of Nations 2018

Building a Sustainable Future
Author: Glenn-Marie Lange,Quentin Wodon,Kevin Carey
Publisher: World Bank Publications
ISBN: 1464810478
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 240
View: 3259

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Countries regularly track gross domestic product (GDP) as an indicator of their economic progress, but not wealth—the assets such as infrastructure, forests, minerals, and human capital that produce GDP. In contrast, corporations routinely report on both their income and assets to assess their economic health and prospects for the future. Wealth accounts allow countries to take stock of their assets to monitor the sustainability of development, an urgent concern today for all countries. The Changing Wealth of Nations 2018: Building a Sustainable Future covers national wealth for 141 countries over 20 years (1995†“2014) as the sum of produced capital, 19 types of natural capital, net foreign assets, and human capital overall as well as by gender and type of employment. Great progress has been made in estimating wealth since the fi rst volume, Where Is the Wealth of Nations? Measuring Capital for the 21st Century, was published in 2006. New data substantially improve estimates of natural capital, and, for the fi rst time, human capital is measured by using household surveys to estimate lifetime earnings. The Changing Wealth of Nations 2018 begins with a review of global and regional trends in wealth over the past two decades and provides examples of how wealth accounts can be used for the analysis of development patterns. Several chapters discuss the new work on human capital and its application in development policy. The book then tackles elements of natural capital that are not yet fully incorporated in the wealth accounts: air pollution, marine fi sheries, and ecosystems. This book targets policy makers but will engage anyone committed to building a sustainable future for the planet.

Culture and Prosperity

The Truth About Markets - Why Some Nations Are Rich But Most Remain Poor
Author: John Kay
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0060587059
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 420
View: 9716

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A witty and accessible tour de force that is immersed in the latest economic thinking, Culture and Prosperity is an indispensable guide to the world around us and destined to become a classic text for understanding the politics of globalization. Guided by the belief that a combination of lightly regulated capitalism and liberal democracy -- the American business model -- is not just appropriate for America at the dawn of the twenty-first century, but a universal path to freedom and prosperity, the United States is an unrivaled colossus seeking to remake the world in its own image. After a decade of successive market revolutions around the world, beginning with the collapse of the Berlin Wall and continuing in countries as diverse as Argentina and New Zealand, the effectiveness of the market economy as a route to prosperity and growth is not in question, but a more sophisticated appreciation of the strengths and limits of markets is urgently required. In this new and illuminating analysis of the nature and evolution of the market economy, John Kay attacks the oversimplified account of its operation, contained in the American business model and favored by politicians and business people. He even questions whether it offers an accurate description of the success of the American economy itself. In an absorbing argument that rewards close reading, and rereading, Culture and Prosperity examines every assumption we have about economic life from a refreshingly new angle. Taking the reader from the shores of Lake Zurich to the streets of Mumbai, from the flower market of San Remo to the sales rooms at Christie's, John Kay reveals the connection between a nation's social, political, and cultural context and its economic performance.

Making poor nations rich

entrepreneurship and the process of economic development
Author: Benjamin Powell,Independent Institute (Oakland, Calif.)
Publisher: Stanford Univ Pr
ISBN: 9780804757317
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 452
View: 9085

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Making Poor Nations Rich illustrates the importance of institutions that support economic freedom and private property rights for promoting the form of productive entrepreneurship that leads to sustained increases in countries’ standard of living.

The World's Banker

A Story of Failed States, Financial Crises, and the Wealth and Poverty of Nations
Author: Sebastian Mallaby
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0143036793
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 488
View: 5179

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Provides a revealing look inside the workings of the World Bank and the realities of global development under the leadership of the colorful James Wolfensohn, examining the changing role of the World Bank in a new era of globalization and international terrorism. Reprint. 30,000 first printing.

Why Geography Matters, More Than Ever


Author: Harm de Blij
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199913749
Category: Nature
Page: 354
View: 3041

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"This work was first published by Oxford University Press in 2005 as Why Geography Matters: Three Challenges Facing America."

Revolution in Time

Clocks and the Making of the Modern World
Author: David S. Landes
Publisher: Belknap Press
ISBN: 9780674002821
Category: History
Page: 518
View: 5294

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More than a decade after the publication of his dazzling book on the cultural, technological, and manufacturing aspects of measuring time and making clocks, David Landes has significantly expanded Revolution in Time. In a new preface and scores of updated passages, he explores new findings about medieval and early-modern time keeping, as well as contemporary hi-tech uses of the watch as mini-computer, cellular phone, and even radio receiver or television screen. While commenting on the latest research, Landes never loses his focus on the historical meaning of time and its many perceptions and uses, questions that go beyond history, that involve philosophers and possibly, theologians and literary folk as well.