Warped Space

Art, Architecture, and Anxiety in Modern Culture
Author: Anthony Vidler
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 9780262720410
Category: Architecture
Page: 301
View: 4701

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Traces the emergence of a psychological idea of space from Pascal and Freud to the identification of agoraphobia and claustrophobia in the nineteenth century to twentieth-century theories of spatial alienation and estrangement in the writings of Georg Simmel, Siegfried Kracauer, and Walter Benjamin.

A Warped Space -- a Novel


Author: Mithra Venkatraj
Publisher: Leadstart Publishing PvtLtd
ISBN: 9383562196
Category: Electronic books
Page: 479
View: 4080

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The novel traces the lives, customs and social mores of people, rich and poor, over a time spanning almost a hundred years. Madhava, a feudal strong man, is ruthless, willful and whimsical as he rules over the House of Kemmadi and its vast estate. Space around him seems to warp like his mind, and the three women, Laxmi, Para and Kamali struggle to live in this space, but not without their happy moments of domestic life and abiding bonds they make. Seetharama is coerced, cajoled and bullied by his older brother, Madhava, into abject submission while his happy marriage to Kamali totters. Ananthayya, Madhava's uncle and trusted man, is jovial and helpful, takes his life as it comes with no undue concern for scruples and morals. This story is as much of the people as of the changing times they live in, and becomes very much so as Madhava stands up for feudalism in its dying days, while the forces unleashed by communist ideology are closing in on him and what he represents.

Animating Space

From Mickey to WALL-E
Author: J.P. Telotte
Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 0813133718
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 296
View: 3253

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Animators work within a strictly defined, limited space that requires difficult artistic decisions. The blank frame presents a dilemma for all animators, and the decision of what to include and leave out raises important questions about artistry, authorship, and cultural influence. In Animating Space: From Mickey to WALL-E, renowned scholar J. P. Telotte explores how animation has confronted the blank template, and how responses to that confrontation have changed. Focusing on American animation, Telotte tracks the development of animation in line with changing cultural attitudes toward space and examines innovations that elevated the medium from a novelty to a fully realized art form. From Winsor McCay and the Fleischer brothers to the Walt Disney Company, Warner Bros., and Pixar Studios, Animating Space explores the contributions of those who invented animation, those who refined it, and those who, in the current digital age, are using it to redefine the very possibilities of cinema.

The Space Warp


Author: John Russell Fearn
Publisher: Wildside Press LLC
ISBN: 1434449491
Category: Fiction
Page: 110
View: 314

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In Annex 10 in the Adirondack Mountains in New York, the scientists under the leadership of astronomer Dr. Gray can hardly believe the things their instruments are telling them; but, because their equipment is absolutely reliable, they HAVE to believe, and on that ill-fated June 30th, they begin to see the chaos will affect mankind. The Earth is growing steadily hotter. Temperatures rocket as the sun shines through the night and the world is plunged into endless day. Everywhere people are suffering--rich and poor, criminal and family man--and none know if or when relief will ever come. Is this the end of the world as we know it?

Pathologies of Modern Space

Empty Space, Urban Anxiety, and the Recovery of the Public Self
Author: Kathryn Milun
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135927375
Category: Architecture
Page: 240
View: 4205

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Pathologies of Modern Space traces the rise of agoraphobia and ties its astonishing growth to the emergence of urban modernity. In contrast to traditional medical conceptions of the disorder, Kathryn Milun shows that this anxiety is closely related to the emergence of "empty urban space": homogenous space, such as malls and parking lots, stripped of memory and tactile features. Pathologies of Modern Space is a compelling cultural analysis of the history of medical treatments for agoraphobia and what they can tell us about the normative expectations for the public self in the modern city.

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: Warped


Author: K.W. Jeter
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0743420780
Category: Fiction
Page: 352
View: 5046

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Political tensions on Bajor are once again on the rise, and the various factions may soon come to open conflict. In addition, a series of murders has shaken everyone on board the station. While Security Chief Odo investigates the murders, Commander Sisko finds himself butting up against a new religious faction that plans to take over Bajor and force the Federation to leave Deep Space Nine. Odo soon traces the murders to a bizarre and dangerous form of holosuite technology--a technology that turns it's users into insane killers and now threatens Sisko's son, Jake. As the situation on Bajor deteriorates, Sisko learns that the political conflict and the new holosuites are connected. Both are the work of a single dangerous man with a plan that threatens the very fabric of reality. The plot is darker than anything Sisko has faced before, and to defeat it, he must enter the heart of a twisted, evil world where danger lurks in every corner and death can come at any moment--from the evil within himself, from his closest friends, or even at the hands of his own son.

Cosmology 101


Author: Kristine M. Larsen
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780313337314
Category: Science
Page: 187
View: 3579

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An introduction to cosmology includes coverage of myths about cosmic bodies, insights gained from technology, and current speculation about the origin and nature of the universe.

Space Warped


Author: Herve Bourhis
Publisher: Boom! Studios
ISBN: 1613981473
Category: Comics & Graphic Novels
Page: N.A
View: 4511

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Far away, in a land long ago...there was an orphaned farm kid with daddy issues trying to rescue an orphaned princess unaware of her daddy issues! In the tradition of ROBOT CHICKEN: STAR WARS and SPACEBALLS comes a loving, affectionate parody of the greatest science fiction franchise of all time. This is a fan-pleasing romp that skewers the original trilogy of one of the greatest adventure stories ever.

Black Holes & Time Warps: Einstein's Outrageous Legacy (Commonwealth Fund Book Program)


Author: Kip Thorne
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393247473
Category: Science
Page: 624
View: 5404

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Winner of the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics Ever since Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity burst upon the world in 1915 some of the most brilliant minds of our century have sought to decipher the mysteries bequeathed by that theory, a legacy so unthinkable in some respects that even Einstein himself rejected them. Which of these bizarre phenomena, if any, can really exist in our universe? Black holes, down which anything can fall but from which nothing can return; wormholes, short spacewarps connecting regions of the cosmos; singularities, where space and time are so violently warped that time ceases to exist and space becomes a kind of foam; gravitational waves, which carry symphonic accounts of collisions of black holes billions of years ago; and time machines, for traveling backward and forward in time. Kip Thorne, along with fellow theorists Stephen Hawking and Roger Penrose, a cadre of Russians, and earlier scientists such as Oppenheimer, Wheeler and Chandrasekhar, has been in the thick of the quest to secure answers. In this masterfully written and brilliantly informed work of scientific history and explanation, Dr. Thorne, a Nobel Prize-winning physicist and the Feynman Professor of Theoretical Physics Emeritus at Caltech, leads his readers through an elegant, always human, tapestry of interlocking themes, coming finally to a uniquely informed answer to the great question: what principles control our universe and why do physicists think they know the things they think they know? Stephen Hawking's A Brief History of Time has been one of the greatest best-sellers in publishing history. Anyone who struggled with that book will find here a more slowly paced but equally mind-stretching experience, with the added fascination of a rich historical and human component. Winner of the Phi Beta Kappa Award in Science.

Impossible Presence

Surface and Screen in the Photogenic Era
Author: Terry Smith
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226763859
Category: Art
Page: 309
View: 6243

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Impossible Presence brings together new work in film studies, critical theory, art history, and anthropology for a multifaceted exploration of the continuing proliferation of visual images in the modern era. It also asks what this proliferation—and the changing technologies that support it—mean for the ways in which images are read today and how they communicate with viewers and spectators. Framed by Terry Smith's introduction, the essays focus on two kinds of strangeness involved in experiencing visual images in the modern era. The first, explored in the book's first half, involves the appearance of oddities or phantasmagoria in early photographs and cinema. The second type of strangeness involves art from marginalized groups and indigenous peoples, and the communicative formations that result from the trafficking of images between people from vastly different cultures. With a stellar list of contributors, Impossible Presence offers a wide-ranging look at the fate of the visual image in modernity, modern art, and popular culture. Contributors: Jean Baudrillard Marshall Berman Jeremy Gilbert-Rolfe Elizabeth Grosz Tom Gunning Peter Hutchings Fred R. Myers Javier Sanjines Richard Shiff Hugh J. Silverman Terry Smith

Synthetic Saints


Author: Jason Rolfe
Publisher: Vagabondage Press LLC
ISBN: 1476253803
Category: Fiction
Page: N.A
View: 3242

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Alex Hargreaves is being haunted by the past. But the ghosts that plague him are born of science, not superstition. As a Security Specialist for the ISA, Alex has a memory implant that allows instantaneous access to memories – both good and bad. He can recall facts and figures with unfailing accuracy, but cannot move past the painful sense of death and abandonment made manifest by the tragic loss of his wife and daughter. Those memories, like all the memories within his mind, remain excruciatingly present. When communication with an isolated Deep Space Observatory is lost, Alex and his synthetic partner, Persephone, are sent to investigate. The Cochrane is a small observatory tucked within a pocket of relative inactivity. A single data analyst runs it on a six-month rotation. Six months in the emptiness of space can feel like an eternity. Depression is a common problem. Suicide and accidental death are not unheard of at stations like Cochrane. Alex and Persephone are sent to learn which of these fates has found Amanda Hayes.

The Search for the Meaning of Space, Time, and Matter

Images of Many Travels
Author: Kai Woehler
Publisher: Xlibris Corporation
ISBN: 146910198X
Category: Science
Page: 447
View: 4192

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The book gives a comprehensive introduction for interested general readers, into the development and structure of concepts, ideas and theory formation about the elementary building blocks of matter, the forces with which these particles interact and about the fundamental nature of space itself. Einsteins theory of the cosmos and the recent discovery of the presence of a dark energy which leads to an accelerated expansion of cosmic space, provide the background for the most astonishing recent developments in the search for the origin of space and matter. The String-Theory revolution has led to the notion that nature may not follow one unique set of laws to build worlds, but that innumerable many possible universes may exist, that worlds may be emerging and disappearing like biological species and that our existence may be extraordinarily rare and therefore precious. An introduction to the concept of emergence in self-organizing systems is given to make the connection to the idea that Emergence may be the inherent creative property of space and matter at the quantum level.

Seven Wonders of Space Phenomena


Author: David J. Ward
Publisher: Twenty-First Century Books
ISBN: 0761354522
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 80
View: 1848

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Explores seven phenomenal wonders in space such as black holes and our universe in the beginning.

Introduction to Modern Dynamics

Chaos, Networks, Space and Time
Author: David D. Nolte
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0199657033
Category: Science
Page: 432
View: 6786

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This book translates important topics of advanced classical physics, usually the rarefied domain of physics graduate classes, into simple language accessible to undergraduate students majoring in the physical sciences and engineering. It presents a unifying approach to the physics of chaos, nonlinear systems, dynamic networks, evolutionary dynamics, econophysics and the theory of relativity. All of these topics share a common foundation in which complex dynamicsare represented as simple trajectories. This approach is called geometric mechanics, and advanced concepts in general relativity or network theory become straightforward explorations of geometriccurves. Each chapter has many worked examples and simple computer simulations that allow the student to explore the rich phenomena of nonlinear physics.

Space Time Play

Computer Games, Architecture and Urbanism: The Next Level
Author: Friedrich von Borries,Steffen P. Walz,Matthias Böttger
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 376438414X
Category: Architecture
Page: 495
View: 2829

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Computer and video games are leaving the PC and conquering the arena of everyday life in the form of mobile applications—the result is new types of cities and architecture. How do these games alter our perception of real and virtual space? What can the designers of physical and digital worlds learn from one another?

People and Space

New Forms of Interaction in the City Project
Author: Giovanni Maciocco,Silvano Tagliagambe
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1402098790
Category: Political Science
Page: 246
View: 893

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This book explores new forms and modalities of relations between people and space that increasingly affect the life of the city. The investigation takes as its starting point the idea that in contemporary societies the loss of our relationship with place is a symptom of a breakdown in the relationship between ethics and aesthetics. This in turn has caused a crisis not only in taste, but also in our sense of beauty, our aesthetic instinct, and our moral values. It has also led to the loss of our engagement with the landscape, which is essential for cities to function. The authors argue that new, fertile forms of interaction between people and space are now happening in what they call the ‘intermediate space’, at the border of “urban normality” and those parts of a city where citizens experiment with unconventional social practices. This new interaction engenders a collective conscience, giving a new and productive vigor to the actions of individuals and also their relations with their environment. These new relations emerge only after we abandon what is called the “therapeutic illusion of space”, which still exists today, and which binds in a deterministic manner the quality of civitas, the associative life of people in the city, to the quality of urban space. Projects for the city should, instead, have as their keystone the notion of social action as a return to a critical perspective, to a courageous acceptance of social responsibility, at the same time as seeking the generative structures of urban life in which civitas and urbs again acknowledge each other.

My Brief History


Author: Stephen Hawking
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 1448169917
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 144
View: 8674

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'His clarity, wit and determination are evident, his understand and good humour moving' New Scientist My Brief History recounts Stephen Hawking’s improbable journey, from his post-war London boyhood to his years of international acclaim and celebrity. Lavishly illustrated with rarely seen photographs, this concise, witty and candid account introduces readers to a Hawking rarely glimpsed in previous books: the inquisitive schoolboy whose classmates nicknamed him ‘Einstein’; the jokester who once placed a bet with a colleague over the existence of a black hole; and the young husband and father struggling to gain a foothold in the world of academia. Writing with characteristic humility and humour, Hawking opens up about the challenges that confronted him following his diagnosis of motor neurone disease aged twenty-one. Tracing his development as a thinker, he explains how the prospect of an early death urged him onwards through numerous intellectual breakthroughs, and talks about the genesis of his masterpiece A Brief History of Time – one of the iconic books of the twentieth century. Clear-eyed, intimate and wise, My Brief History opens a window for the rest of us into Hawking’s personal cosmos. 'Read it for the personal nuggets . . . but above all, it's worth reading for its message of hope' Mail on Sunday