Warfare in antiquity


Author: Hans Delbruck,Hans Delbr_ck
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803291997
Category: History
Page: 604
View: 9481

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Translation of: Geschichte der Kriegskunst im Rahmen der politischen Geschichte.

Art of the Western World

From Ancient Greece to Post Modernism
Author: Bruce Cole,Adelheid M. Gealt
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0671747282
Category: Art
Page: 368
View: 6228

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Traces the history of Western art from its classical roots up to the present day, and integrates the works of each period with the history, values, and ideals that gave birth to them

The Art of War


Author: Tzu, Sun
Publisher: Aegitas
ISBN: 5000645391
Category: Fiction
Page: 125
View: 2950

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The Art of War is an ancient Chinese military treatise attributed to Sun Tzu, a high-ranking military general, strategist and tactician. The treatise in translated from the Chinese, with an introduction and critical notes by Lionel Giles, M.A. Assistant Department of Oriental Printed Books And Manuscripts.

The barbarian invasions


Author: Hans Delbr_ck
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803292000
Category: History
Page: 487
View: 2880

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Translation of: Geschichte der Kriegskunst im Rahmen der politischen Geschichte.

Warfare in antiquity


Author: Hans Delbruck,Hans Delbr_ck
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803291997
Category: History
Page: 604
View: 5934

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Translation of: Geschichte der Kriegskunst im Rahmen der politischen Geschichte.

The Future of War

A History
Author: Lawrence Freedman
Publisher: PublicAffairs
ISBN: 1610393066
Category: History
Page: 400
View: 9696

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Questions about the future of war are a regular feature of political debate, strategic analysis, and popular fiction. Where should we look for new dangers? What cunning plans might an aggressor have in mind? What are the best forms of defense? How might peace be preserved or conflict resolved? From the French rout at Sedan in 1870 to the relentless contemporary insurgencies in Iraq and Afghanistan, Lawrence Freedman, a world-renowned military thinker, reveals how most claims from the military futurists are wrong. But they remain influential nonetheless. Freedman shows how those who have imagined future war have often had an idealized notion of it as confined, brief, and decisive, and have regularly taken insufficient account of the possibility of long wars-hence the stubborn persistence of the idea of a knockout blow, whether through a dashing land offensive, nuclear first strike, or cyberattack. He also notes the lack of attention paid to civil wars until the West began to intervene in them during the 1990s, and how the boundaries between peace and war, between the military, the civilian, and the criminal are becoming increasingly blurred. Freedman's account of a century and a half of warfare and the (often misconceived) thinking that precedes war is a challenge to hawks and doves alike, and puts current strategic thinking into a bracing historical perspective.

International Who's Who of Authors and Writers 2004


Author: Europa Publications
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9781857431797
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 640
View: 3059

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The International Who's Who of Authors and Writers provides a practical source of information on the personalities and organizations of the literary world.

Foundation

The History of England from Its Earliest Beginnings to the Tudors
Author: Peter Ackroyd
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 1250013674
Category: History
Page: 496
View: 6426

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The first book in Peter Ackroyd's history of England series, which has since been followed up with two more installments, Tudors and Rebellion. In Foundation, the chronicler of London and of its river, the Thames, takes us from the primeval forests of England's prehistory to the death, in 1509, of the first Tudor king, Henry VII. He guides us from the building of Stonehenge to the founding of the two great glories of medieval England: common law and the cathedrals. He shows us glimpses of the country's most distant past--a Neolithic stirrup found in a grave, a Roman fort, a Saxon tomb, a medieval manor house--and describes in rich prose the successive waves of invaders who made England English, despite being themselves Roman, Viking, Saxon, or Norman French. With his extraordinary skill for evoking time and place and his acute eye for the telling detail, Ackroyd recounts the story of warring kings, of civil strife, and foreign wars. But he also gives us a vivid sense of how England's early people lived: the homes they built, the clothes the wore, the food they ate, even the jokes they told. All are brought vividly to life in this history of England through the narrative mastery of one of Britain's finest writers.

Buddhist Warfare


Author: Michael Jerryson,Mark Juergensmeyer
Publisher: OUP USA
ISBN: 0195394836
Category: Philosophy
Page: 257
View: 5202

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This book offers eight essays examining the dark side of a tradition often regarded as the religion of peace. The authors note the conflict between the Buddhist norms of non-violence and the prohibition of the killing of sentient beings and acts of state violence supported by the Buddhist community (sangha), acts of civil violence in which monks participate, and Buddhist intersectarian violence.

Why the West Rules - For Now

The Patterns of History, and What They Reveal About the Future
Author: Ian Morris
Publisher: McClelland & Stewart
ISBN: 1551995816
Category: History
Page: 768
View: 4719

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Why does the West rule? In this magnum opus, eminent Stanford polymath Ian Morris answers this provocative question, drawing on 50,000 years of history, archeology, and the methods of social science, to make sense of when, how, and why the paths of development differed in the East and West — and what this portends for the 21st century. There are two broad schools of thought on why the West rules. Proponents of "Long-Term Lock-In" theories such as Jared Diamond suggest that from time immemorial, some critical factor — geography, climate, or culture perhaps — made East and West unalterably different, and determined that the industrial revolution would happen in the West and push it further ahead of the East. But the East led the West between 500 and 1600, so this development can't have been inevitable; and so proponents of "Short-Term Accident" theories argue that Western rule was a temporary aberration that is now coming to an end, with Japan, China, and India resuming their rightful places on the world stage. However, as the West led for 9,000 of the previous 10,000 years, it wasn't just a temporary aberration. So, if we want to know why the West rules, we need a whole new theory. Ian Morris, boldly entering the turf of Jared Diamond and Niall Ferguson, provides the broader approach that is necessary, combining the textual historian's focus on context, the anthropological archaeologist's awareness of the deep past, and the social scientist's comparative methods to make sense of the past, present, and future — in a way no one has ever done before. From the Hardcover edition.

The Oxford History of Greece and the Hellenistic World


Author: John Boardman,Jasper Griffin
Publisher: Oxford Paperbacks
ISBN: 0192852477
Category: History
Page: 520
View: 497

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The period from the emergence of the Greek city-state in the eighth century BC to the reign of Alexander the Great and the establishment of Greek monarchies was one unparalleled in history for its brilliance in literature, philosophy, and the visual arts. This book reproduces the text of the hugely successful Oxford History of the Classical World: Greece and the Hellenistic World in a standard paperback form. Written by a team of leading classical scholars, it includes chapters on political and social history, Homer, Greek myth, drama, science, and the great philosophers. All the original line drawings and maps have been retained, and an eight-page plate section has been specially selected for this edition by Sir John Boardman. - ;The period from the emergence of the Greek city-state in the eighth century BC to the reign of Alexander the Great and the establishment of Greek monarchies was one unparalleled in history for its brilliance in literature, philosophy, and the visual arts. This book reproduces the text of the hugely successful Oxford History of the Classical World: Greece and the Hellenistic World in a standard paperback form. Written by a team of leading classical scholars, it includes chapters on political and social history, Homer, Greek myth, drama, science, and the great philosophers. All the original line drawings and maps have been retained, and an eight-page plate section has been specially selected for this edition by Sir John Boardman. -

The Literary Gazette

A Weekly Journal of Literature, Science, and the Fine Arts
Author: William Jerdan,William Ring Workman,John Morley,Frederick Arnold,Charles Wycliffe Goodwin
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category:
Page: N.A
View: 820

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Empires of Food

Feast, Famine, and the Rise and Fall of Civilizations
Author: Evan Fraser,Andrew Rimas
Publisher: Counterpoint
ISBN: 1582437939
Category: History
Page: 320
View: 8495

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Using the colorful diaries of a sixteenth-century merchant as a narrative guide, Empires of Food vividly chronicles the fate of people and societies for the past 12,000 years through the foods they grew, hunted, traded, and ate—and offers fascinating, and devastating, insights into what to expect in years to come. In energetic prose, agricultural expert Evan D.G. Fraser and journalist Andrew capture the flavor of places as disparate as ancient Mesopotamia and imperial Britain, taking us from the first city in the once-thriving Fertile Crescent to today’s overworked breadbaskets and rice bowls in the United States and China. Cities, culture, art, government, and religion were founded on the creation and exchange of food surpluses. Complex societies were built by shipping grain up rivers and into the stewpots of history’s generations. But evenutally, inevitably, the crops fail, the fields erode, or the temperature drops, and the center of power shifts. Cultures descend into dark ages of poverty, famine, and war. A fascinating, fresh history told through the prism of the dining table, Empires of Food offers a grand scope and a provocative analysis of the world today, indispensable in this time of global warming and food crises.

Soldiers & Ghosts

A History of Battle in Classical Antiquity
Author: J. E. Lendon
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300119794
Category: History
Page: 468
View: 2914

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What set the successful armies of Sparta, Macedon, and Rome apart from those they defeated? In this major new history of battle from the age of Homer through the decline of the Roman empire, J. E. Lendon surveys a millennium of warfare to discover how militaries change--and don't change--and how an army's greatness depends on its use of the past. Noting this was an age that witnessed few technological advances, J. E. Lendon shows us that the most successful armies were those that made the most effective use of cultural tradition. Ancient combat moved forward by looking backward for inspiration--the Greeks, to Homer; the Romans, to the Greeks and to their own heroic past. The best ancient armies recruited soldiers from societies with strong competitive traditions; and the best ancient leaders, from Alexander to Julius Caesar, called upon those traditions to encourage ferocious competition at every rank. Ranging from the Battle of Champions between Sparta and Argos in 550 B.C. through Julian's invasion of Persia in A.D. 363, Soldiers and Ghosts brings to life the most decisive military contests of ancient Greece and Rome. Lendon places these battles, and the methods by which they were fought, in a sweeping narrative of ancient military history. On every battlefield, living soldiers fought alongside the ghosts of tradition--ghosts that would inspire greatness for almost a millennium before ultimately coming to stifle it.

Sapiens

A Brief History of Humankind
Author: Yuval Noah Harari
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062316109
Category: Science
Page: 464
View: 5011

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New York Times Bestseller A Summer Reading Pick for President Barack Obama, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg From a renowned historian comes a groundbreaking narrative of humanity’s creation and evolution—a #1 international bestseller—that explores the ways in which biology and history have defined us and enhanced our understanding of what it means to be “human.” One hundred thousand years ago, at least six different species of humans inhabited Earth. Yet today there is only one—homo sapiens. What happened to the others? And what may happen to us? Most books about the history of humanity pursue either a historical or a biological approach, but Dr. Yuval Noah Harari breaks the mold with this highly original book that begins about 70,000 years ago with the appearance of modern cognition. From examining the role evolving humans have played in the global ecosystem to charting the rise of empires, Sapiens integrates history and science to reconsider accepted narratives, connect past developments with contemporary concerns, and examine specific events within the context of larger ideas. Dr. Harari also compels us to look ahead, because over the last few decades humans have begun to bend laws of natural selection that have governed life for the past four billion years. We are acquiring the ability to design not only the world around us, but also ourselves. Where is this leading us, and what do we want to become? Featuring 27 photographs, 6 maps, and 25 illustrations/diagrams, this provocative and insightful work is sure to spark debate and is essential reading for aficionados of Jared Diamond, James Gleick, Matt Ridley, Robert Wright, and Sharon Moalem.