Untold Stories

Economics and Business Journalism in African Media
Author: P. M. Kareithi,Nixon Kariithi
Publisher: Witwatersrand University Press
ISBN: 9781868144143
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 275
View: 4291

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Untold Stories is an attempt by African media scholars to fill the void created by the dearth of research and publications on emerging areas of African journalism. The book captures major developments in economics and business journalism in Africa and provides a framework for research in this field. Each article is accompanied by responses from practicing journalists across the continent, which focus the more philosophical discussions on very functional issues.

Journalism Education, Training and Employment


Author: Bob Franklin,Donica Mensing
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136835660
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 248
View: 8539

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During this period of rapid and significant change in journalistic practices, journalism educators are re-examining their own profession and contributing to the invention of new models and practices. This edited volume of studies by respected international scholars describes the diverse issues journalism educators are grappling with and the changes they are making in purpose and practice. The book is organized into three sections -- education, training and employment – that explore common themes: How the assumptions embedded in journalism education are being examined and revised in the light of transformative changes in communication; How the definitions of journalism and journalists are broadening in scope and what this means for educators; How newsrooms and training programs around the world are being re-examined and made more effective. An introductory essay and section summaries provide context for the thirteen chapters that constitute the collection. The section on journalism education explores fundamental ways educators are seeking to make their institutions and practices stronger and more responsive. The section on training includes case studies of journalism training programs in sub-Saharan Africa, Turkey, Sweden and the U.S. The final section examines the job prospects and employment market for journalism students with data from the U.S., U.K, Australia, and Sweden. The scope of issues considered in the book makes it a valuable resource for journalism scholars from around the world, as well as doctoral students, journalism and communication administrators in universities, organizations that fund journalism training programs, and practitioners interested in understanding employment and education trends.

Newsmaking Cultures in Africa

Normative Trends in the Dynamics of Socio-Political & Economic Struggles
Author: Hayes Mawindi Mabweazara
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137541091
Category: Social Science
Page: 396
View: 4818

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This book contributes to a broadened theorisation of journalism by exploring the intricacies of African journalism and its connections with the material realities that underpin the profession on the continent. It pulls together theoretically driven studies that collectively deploy a wide range of evidence to shed some light on newsmaking cultures in Africa – the everyday routines, defining epistemologies, as well as ethical dilemmas. The volume digs beneath the standardised and universalised veneer of professionalism to unpack routine practices and normative trends shaped by local factors, including the structural conditions of deprivation, entrenched political instability (and interference), pervasive neo-patrimonial governance systems, and the influences of technological developments. These varied and complex circumstances are shown to profoundly shape the foundations of journalism in Africa, resulting in routine practices that are both normatively distinct and equally in tune with (imported) Western journalistic cultures. The book thus broadly points to the dialectical nature of news production and the inconsistent and contradictory relationships that characterise news production cultures in Africa.

Media Reforms and Democratization in Emerging Democracies of Sub-Saharan Africa


Author: Ufuoma Akpojivi
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319753010
Category: Social Science
Page: 177
View: 2519

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This book examines the media reform processes and re-democratization projects of Ghana and Nigeria’s emerging democracies. It evaluates and critiques these reform processes, arguing that because of dependency approaches resulting from the transplanting of policy framework from the West into these emerging democracies, the policy goals and objectives of the reforms have not been achieved. Consequently, the inherent socio-cultural, economic and political factors, coupled with the historical antecedents of these countries, have also affected the reform process. Drawing from policy documents, analyses and interviews, Ufuoma Akpojivi argues that the lack of citizens’ active participation in policy processes has led to neo-liberalization and the continued universalization of Western ideologies such as democracy, media freedom and independence. Akpojivi posits that the recognition of socio-cultural, political and economic factors inherent to these emerging democracies, coupled with the communal participation of citizens, will facilitate true media reform processes and development of these countries.

The Press of Africa

Persecution and Perseverance
Author: Frank Barton
Publisher: Holmes & Meier Pub
ISBN: N.A
Category: Press
Page: 304
View: 2792

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Power, Politics and Identity in South African Media

Selected Seminar Papers
Author: Adrian Hadland
Publisher: Human Sciences Research Council
ISBN: N.A
Category: Social Science
Page: 403
View: 8419

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This collection explores the often-overlooked role of media in the shaping of identity and culture in postapartheid South Africa. Interrogating contemporary theory, these essays shed new light on how identities are constructed through the media and provide case studies that illustrate the complex process of identity renegotiation taking place in postapartheid South Africa, giving fresh focus to topics that scholarship has overlooked—such as the pervasive impact of tabloid newspapers. The contributors include both established scholars and new voices, all of whom represent some of South Africa's finest media analysts grappling with one of the country's most vexing issues—who are we?

African Studies in Social Movements and Democracy


Author: Mahmood Mamdani,Eshetu Chole,Jibrin Ibrahim,E. Wamba-dia-Wamba
Publisher: Conseil Pour Le Developement De LA
ISBN: N.A
Category: Social Science
Page: 626
View: 6499

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Trade unions, burial societies, students, religious and gender movements, riots and mafias. Not to mention class. The kaleidoscope of African social movements is complex and broad. But their histories have strong common threads - the experience of past oppression and the constant struggle for an identity that will encompass survival. How have they contributed to the nature of African civil society and the formation of democracy? The chapters are a living dialogue on the interpretation of these movements, and a critical and analytical appraisal of the African intellectual heritage itself. The book brings together a vast array of writers and topics from all over Africa - from bread riots in Tunisia, Communist Parties in Sudan, the "Kaduna Mafia" in Nigeria, burial societies in Zimbabwe, and the working class in Algeria.

When Reporters Cross the Line

The Heroes, the Villains, the Hackers and the Spies
Author: Stewart Purvis,Jeff Hulbert
Publisher: Biteback Publishing
ISBN: 1849546460
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 400
View: 1323

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When Reporters Cross the Line tells the true story of moments when the worlds of media, propaganda, politics, espionage and crime collide, casting journalism into controversy. Its pages feature some of the best-known names in British broadcasting, including John Simpson, Lindsey Hilsum and Charles Wheeler. There are men and women who went beyond recognised journalistic conventions. Some disregarded the code of their craft in the name of public interest; some crossed the line in ways that had truly shocking consequences. Many of the details have been kept as closely guarded secrets - until now. This unique account of modern reporting examines the lengths to which journalists on the front line are prepared to go to get a story or to espouse a cause. Journalistic heroes and villains abound, but certain of those heroes were flawed, and some of the villains were surprisingly principled. In the heat of war and political conflict, boundaries are ignored and ethics forgotten - and not just by opposing armies. In this extraordinary book, Stewart Purvis and Jeff Hulbert offer unparalleled access to the minds of reporters and to the often disturbing decisions they make when faced with extreme situations. In doing so, it hammers home some unpalatable truths, posing the fundamental question: where do you draw the line?

Popular Media, Democracy and Development in Africa


Author: Herman Wasserman
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136911618
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 304
View: 9643

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Popular Media, Democracy and Development in Africa examines the role that popular media could play to encourage political debate, provide information for development, or critique the very definitions of ‘democracy’ and ‘development’. Drawing on diverse case studies from various regions of the African continent, essays employ a range of theoretical and methodological approaches to ask critical questions about the potential of popular media to contribute to democratic culture, provide sites of resistance, or, conversely, act as agents for the spread of Americanized entertainment culture to the detriment of local traditions. A wide variety of media formats and platforms are discussed, ranging from radio and television to the Internet, mobile phones, street posters, film and music. As part of the Routledge series Internationalizing Media Studies, the book responds to the important challenge of broadening perspectives on media studies by bringing together a range of expert analyses of media in the African continent that will be of interest to students and scholars of media in Africa and further afield.

The News Untold: Community Journalism and the Failure to Confront Poverty in Appalachia


Author: Michael Clay Carey
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781943665969
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 252
View: 8222

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The News Untold offers an important new perspective on media narratives about poverty in Appalachia. It focuses on how small-town reporters and editors in some of the region's poorest communities decide what aspects of poverty are news, how their audiences interpret those decisions, and how those two related processes help shape broader understandings of economic need and local social responsibility. Focusing on patterns of both media creation and consumption, The News Untold shows how a lack of constructive news coverage of economic need can make it harder for the poor to voice their concerns. Critical and inclusive news coverage of poverty at the local level, Michael Clay Carey writes, can help communities start to look past old stereotypes and attitudes and encourage solutions that incorporate broader sets of community voices. Such an effort will require journalists and community leaders to reexamine some of the professional traditions and social views that often shape what news looks like in small towns.

Untangling the Web


Author: Aleks Krotoski
Publisher: Faber & Faber
ISBN: 0571303676
Category: Social Science
Page: 224
View: 3191

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The World Wide Web is the most revolutionary innovation of our time. In the last decade, it has utterly transformed our lives. But what real effects is it having on our social world? What does it mean to be a modern family when dinner table conversations take place over smartphones? What happens to privacy when we readily share our personal lives with friends and corporations? Are our Facebook updates and Twitterings inspiring revolution or are they just a symptom of our global narcissism? What counts as celebrity, when everyone can have a following or be a paparazzo? And what happens to relationships when love, sex and hate can be mediated by a computer? Social psychologist Aleks Krotoski has spent a decade untangling the effects of the Web on how we work, live and play. In this groundbreaking book, she uncovers how much humanity has - and hasn't - changed because of our increasingly co-dependent relationship with the computer. In Untangling the Web, she tells the story of how the network became woven in our lives, and what it means to be alive in the age of the Internet.

Changing the Fourth Estate

Essays on South African Journalism
Author: Adrian Hadland
Publisher: HSRC Press
ISBN: 9780796920973
Category: History
Page: 247
View: 5189

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This compilation of personal essays by some of South Africa's top journalists explores a range of perspectives within "the fourth estate"—from the editor's chair to the travel writer's airplane seat to the news journalist's foxhole. Virtually every aspect of journalism is addressed, including design, multimedia, ethics, and interview techniques, and advice is interspersed throughout on how the next generation of journalists might advance their craft.

China's Media and Soft Power in Africa

Promotion and Perceptions
Author: X. Zhang,H. Wasserman,W. Mano
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137539674
Category: Social Science
Page: 237
View: 9134

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This volume brings together scholars from different disciplines and nations to examine and assess the effectiveness of China's soft power initiatives in Africa. It throws light not only on China's engagement with Africa but also on how China's increasing influence is received in the African media.

The New Ethics of Journalism

Principles for the 21st Century
Author: Kelly McBride,Tom Rosenstiel
Publisher: CQ Press
ISBN: 1483320952
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 256
View: 9464

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Featuring a new code of ethics for journalists and essays by 14 journalism thought leaders and practitioners, The New Ethics of Journalism: Principles for the 21st Century, by Kelly McBride and Tom Rosenstiel, examines the new pressures brought to bear on journalism by technology and changing audience habits. It offers a new framework for making critical moral choices, as well as case studies that reinforce the concepts and principles rising to prominence in 21st century communication. The book addresses the unique problems facing journalism today, including how we arrive at truth in an era of abundant and unverified information; the evolution of new business models and partnerships; the presence of journalists on independent social media platforms; the role of diversity; the meaning of stories; the value of images; and the role of community in the production of journalism.

The Elements of Journalism

What Newspeople Should Know and the Public Should Expect
Author: Bill Kovach,Tom Rosenstiel
Publisher: Three Rivers Press (CA)
ISBN: 0804136785
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 332
View: 3898

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The authors outline the main principles of journalism, discussing the ethical and professional issues affecting the work of newspeople, the forces shaping the profession, and the future of journalism. 50,000 first printing.

The Shock Doctrine

The Rise of Disaster Capitalism
Author: Naomi Klein
Publisher: Metropolitan Books
ISBN: 9781429919487
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 576
View: 1278

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The bestselling author of No Logo shows how the global "free market" has exploited crises and shock for three decades, from Chile to Iraq In her groundbreaking reporting over the past few years, Naomi Klein introduced the term "disaster capitalism." Whether covering Baghdad after the U.S. occupation, Sri Lanka in the wake of the tsunami, or New Orleans post-Katrina, she witnessed something remarkably similar. People still reeling from catastrophe were being hit again, this time with economic "shock treatment," losing their land and homes to rapid-fire corporate makeovers. The Shock Doctrine retells the story of the most dominant ideology of our time, Milton Friedman's free market economic revolution. In contrast to the popular myth of this movement's peaceful global victory, Klein shows how it has exploited moments of shock and extreme violence in order to implement its economic policies in so many parts of the world from Latin America and Eastern Europe to South Africa, Russia, and Iraq. At the core of disaster capitalism is the use of cataclysmic events to advance radical privatization combined with the privatization of the disaster response itself. Klein argues that by capitalizing on crises, created by nature or war, the disaster capitalism complex now exists as a booming new economy, and is the violent culmination of a radical economic project that has been incubating for fifty years.