Uncle Sam Wants You

World War I and the Making of the Modern American Citizen
Author: Christopher Capozzola
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199830967
Category: History
Page: 352
View: 8207

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Based on a rich array of sources that capture the voices of both political leaders and ordinary Americans, Uncle Sam Wants You offers a vivid and provocative new interpretation of American political history, revealing how the tensions of mass mobilization during World War I led to a significant increase in power for the federal government. Christopher Capozzola shows how, when the war began, Americans at first mobilized society by stressing duty, obligation, and responsibility over rights and freedoms. But the heated temper of war quickly unleashed coercion on an unprecedented scale, making wartime America the scene of some of the nation's most serious political violence, including notorious episodes of outright mob violence. To solve this problem, Americans turned over increasing amounts of power to the federal government. In the end, whether they were some of the four million men drafted under the Selective Service Act or the tens of millions of home-front volunteers, Americans of the World War I era created a new American state, and new ways of being American citizens.

Uncle Sam Wants You

World War I and the Making of the Modern American Citizen
Author: Christopher Capozzola
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 019533549X
Category: History
Page: 334
View: 3748

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Examines the effects of participation in World War I on society and government in the United States, including the increased tolerance of legal controls on behavior and the condemnation of those who did not conform.

Uncle Sam Wants You

World War I and the Making of the Modern American Citizen
Author: Christopher Capozzola
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199714865
Category: History
Page: 352
View: 2646

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Based on a rich array of sources that capture the voices of both political leaders and ordinary Americans, Uncle Sam Wants You offers a vivid and provocative new interpretation of American political history, revealing how the tensions of mass mobilization during World War I led to a significant increase in power for the federal government. Christopher Capozzola shows how, when the war began, Americans at first mobilized society by stressing duty, obligation, and responsibility over rights and freedoms. But the heated temper of war quickly unleashed coercion on an unprecedented scale, making wartime America the scene of some of the nation's most serious political violence, including notorious episodes of outright mob violence. To solve this problem, Americans turned over increasing amounts of power to the federal government. In the end, whether they were some of the four million men drafted under the Selective Service Act or the tens of millions of home-front volunteers, Americans of the World War I era created a new American state, and new ways of being American citizens.

Mobilizing Minerva

American Women in the First World War
Author: Kimberly Jensen
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252074963
Category: History
Page: 244
View: 8770

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The case for woman suffrage, economic equality, and citizenship in WWI

Patriotic Murder

A World War I Hate Crime for Uncle Sam
Author: Peter Stehman
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 164012098X
Category: HISTORY
Page: 304
View: 1766

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Robert Prager, a lonely German immigrant searching for the American dream, was probably the most shameful U.S. casualty of World War I. From coast to coast, Americans had been whipped into a patriotic frenzy by a steady diet of government propaganda and hate-mongering. In Collinsville, Illinois, an enraged, drunken mob hung Prager from a tree just after midnight on April 5, 1918. Coal miners in the St. Louis suburb would show the nation they were doing their patriotic part--that they, too, were fighting the fight. And who would stop them anyway? Not the alderman or businessmen who watched silently. Not the four policemen who let Prager from their custody, without drawing a weapon. And who would hold the mob leaders accountable? Certainly not the jury that took just ten minutes to acquit them, all while a band played "The Star-Spangled Banner" in the courthouse lobby. Peter Stehman sheds light on the era's hijacking of civil liberties and a forgotten crime some might say has fallen prey to "patriotic amnesia." Unfortunately, the lessons from Patriotic Murder on intolerance and hate still resonate today as anti-immigration rhetoric and über-nationalism have resurfaced in American political discussion a century later.

Torchbearers of Democracy

African American Soldiers in the World War I Era
Author: Chad L. Williams
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807899359
Category: Social Science
Page: 472
View: 4867

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For the 380,000 African American soldiers who fought in World War I, Woodrow Wilson's charge to make the world "safe for democracy" carried life-or-death meaning. Chad L. Williams reveals the central role of African American soldiers in the global conflict and how they, along with race activists and ordinary citizens, committed to fighting for democracy at home and beyond. Using a diverse range of sources, Torchbearers of Democracy reclaims the legacy of African American soldiers and veterans and connects their history to issues such as the obligations of citizenship, combat and labor, diaspora and internationalism, homecoming and racial violence, "New Negro" militancy, and African American memories of the war.

"Out Here at the Front"

The World War I Letters of Nora Saltonstall
Author: Nora Saltonstall
Publisher: UPNE
ISBN: 9781555535988
Category: History
Page: 296
View: 6843

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Nora Saltonstall (1894-1919) was just twenty-three when she left behind her privileged, upper-class life in Boston for volunteer service in France during the Great War. Nora's mission began in 1917, and took her through waters prowled by German U-boats, to refugee, canteen, and dispensary work in Paris, and then, just before the decisive battles of 1918 got underway, to Mrs. Daly's autochir, a mobile surgical hospital on the Western Front, where she served as quartermaster, driver, auto mechanic, and nursing assistant. Now Nora's war correspondence - letters she wrote home to anxious family and friends from October 1917 to March 1919 - are published here for the first time. Written in a fresh, straightforward, and unpretentious voice, with an irreverent and charming sense of humor, Nora's engaging and richly detailed missives tell of securing food and medical supplies, assisting refugees, preparing wounded soldiers for surgery, and packing and moving the autochir under the threat of enemy fire. They also tell of the experiences of the many young men in Nora's circle, including her brother (and future U.S. senator) Leverett, who volunteered as ambulance drivers and soldiers, and of

A Date Which Will Live

Pearl Harbor in American Memory
Author: Emily S. Rosenberg
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 9780822332060
Category: History
Page: 236
View: 5153

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How Pearl Harbor has been written about, thought of, and manipulated in American culture.

Making the World Safe

The American Red Cross and a Nation's Humanitarian Awakening
Author: Julia Irwin
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199766401
Category: History
Page: 273
View: 2507

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A history of the relationship between the United States and foreign countries through its humanitarian interventions in the early 20th century.

The Path to War

How the First World War Created Modern America
Author: Michael S. Neiberg
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190464968
Category: United States
Page: 272
View: 8302

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America's entry into World War One in April 1917 marked the end of one era in the nation's history and the start of another. As acclaimed historian Michael S. Neiberg reveals in his compelling new work, the Great War erupted in the midst of lively domestic debate as to what America's roleshould be in the global sphere. Whereas Woodrow Wilson was re-elected in 1916 by pledging to stay out of the conflict in Europe, former president Theodore Roosevelt was convinced that the war offered a means for the U.S. to become a dominant power and ensure national security.In The Road Over There, Neiberg follows American reactions to such events as the Lusitania, German espionage, and the Zimmermann telegram, shedding light on the dilemmas and crises that the country faced in the war years. In the summer of 1916, German agents detonated the Black Tom railroadterminal in Jersey City, New Jersey, leaving only fragments of piers (still visible today); it was the costliest act of domestic terrorism in American history before 9/11 and its effect was galvanizing.Neiberg's book will revive debates around America's entry into World War One, building to Wilson's declaration while examining the forces and shifts that made it all but inevitable. Neiberg establishes beyond question that World War One was not a parenthetical exception in American history but amoment of national and international self-identification, one whose effects still resonate today.

Uncle Sam's Policemen

The Pursuit of Fugitives across Borders
Author: Katherine Unterman
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674915895
Category: Law
Page: N.A
View: 9760

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Extraordinary rendition—abducting criminal suspects around the world—has been criticized as an unprecedented expansion of U.S. policing. But America’s pursuit of fugitives beyond its borders predates the Global War on Terror. Katherine Unterman shows that the extension of manhunts into foreign lands formed an important chapter in American empire.

For Home and Country

World War I Propaganda on the Home Front
Author: Celia M. Kingsbury
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 0803228325
Category: History
Page: 280
View: 9689

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For Home and Country examines the propaganda that targeted noncombatants on the home front in the United States and Europe during World War I. Cookbooks, popular magazines, romance novels, and government food agencies targeted women in their homes, especially their kitchens, pressuring them to change their domestic habits. Children were also taught to fear the enemy and support the war through propaganda in the form of toys, games, and books. And when women and children were not the recipients of propaganda, they were often used in propaganda to target men. By examining a diverse collection of literary texts, songs, posters, and toys, Celia Malone Kingsbury reveals how these pervasive materials were used to fight the war's cultural battle.

World War I and the American Constitution


Author: William G. Ross
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 110709464X
Category: History
Page: 404
View: 8364

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"This book will explore the political, economic, and social forces that generated such rapid changes in traditional understandings of the constitutional relationships between the federal and state governments and their citizens"--

Love and Death in the Great War


Author: Andrew J. Huebner
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190853921
Category: History
Page: 400
View: 1423

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Americans today harbor no strong or consistent collective memory of the First World War. Ask why they fought or what they accomplished, and "democracy" is the most likely if vague response. The circulation of confusing or lofty rationales for intervention started from the moment President Woodrow Wilson secured a war declaration in April 1917. Yet amid those shifting justifications, Love and Death in the Great War argues, was a more durable and resonant one: Americans would fight forhome and family.Intervention came at a moment when arbiters of tradition regarded those very institutions - the white family in particular - under pressure from all sides: industrial work, women's employment, immigration, urban vice, woman suffrage, and most incendiary, the imagined threat of black sexualaggression. Alleged German crimes in France and Belgium seemed to further imperil women and children. Americans would fight, many said, to protect the family literally, but also indirectly. War promised to restore convention, stabilize gender roles, and sharpen male character. Love and Death in the Great War tracks such ideas of redemptive war across public and private spaces, policy and implementation, home and front, popular culture and personal correspondence. Huebner merges untold stories of men and women from Missouri, Wisconsin, Alabama, Louisiana, and other placeswith a history of wartime culture. Studying the radiating impact of war alongside the management of opinion, he recovers the conflict's emotional dimensions-its everyday rhythms, heartbreaking losses, soaring possibilities, and broken promises. Telling the war story as a love story, however, generated contradictions and challenges, some subtle, some transformative, some violent. African Americans and women serving in the army disrupted narratives of white chivalric rescue. Military life proved inhospitable to virtue. Death and injurybrought destruction not regeneration. An army of mostly drafted men sought recompense for lives interrupted as much as patriotic or personal credibility. After the Great War, the mobilization of real and symbolic families would never quite look the same again.

Promise and Peril


Author: Christopher McKnight Nichols
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674061187
Category: History
Page: 445
View: 6011

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Spreading democracy abroad or protecting business at home: this book offers a new look at the history of the contest between isolationalism and internationalism that is as current as the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and as old as America itself, with profiles of the people, policies, and events that shaped the debate.

Democracy's Prisoner


Author: Ernest Freeberg
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674027922
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 380
View: 6180

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An eye-opening narrative shows that the campaign to send socialist leader Eugene V. Debs from an Atlanta jailhouse to the White House was part of a wider national debate over the right to free speech in wartime.

The Day Wall Street Exploded

A Story of America in Its First Age of Terror
Author: Beverly Gage
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199759286
Category: History
Page: 400
View: 379

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Examines the 1920 bombing of Wall Street in which thirty-nine people died and hundreds were injured, with details on the suspects, victims, investigators, and the four year manhunt for the perpetrators.

The Killing of Uncle Sam

The Demise of the United States of America
Author: Rodney Howard-Browne,Paul L. Williams
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781640070974
Category: Political Science
Page: 425
View: 8337

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Pride, greed, and power have driven men to do the unthinkable - including selling out their nations and unsuspected citizens to the most corrupt and destructive "invisible" global leaders on Earth. But how did this happen on American soil? How did the downfall begin and who were the predators that the "land of the free and home of the brave" fell victim to? And is all hope lost? This book captures details of the last 200 years of American history that mainstream media does not want you to know. It dissects the "legalized" system of the private central banks that has gone unchecked, and delivers gut-wrenching truths about the real domestic and foreign enemies of the United States. With over 2,000 footnotes and quotes from former presidents, prime ministers, and state officials; it will equip you with the facts the government has covered for centuries, and empower you to stand up for the truth.