Uncle Sam Wants You

World War I and the Making of the Modern American Citizen
Author: Christopher Capozzola
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199830967
Category: History
Page: 352
View: 5483

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Based on a rich array of sources that capture the voices of both political leaders and ordinary Americans, Uncle Sam Wants You offers a vivid and provocative new interpretation of American political history, revealing how the tensions of mass mobilization during World War I led to a significant increase in power for the federal government. Christopher Capozzola shows how, when the war began, Americans at first mobilized society by stressing duty, obligation, and responsibility over rights and freedoms. But the heated temper of war quickly unleashed coercion on an unprecedented scale, making wartime America the scene of some of the nation's most serious political violence, including notorious episodes of outright mob violence. To solve this problem, Americans turned over increasing amounts of power to the federal government. In the end, whether they were some of the four million men drafted under the Selective Service Act or the tens of millions of home-front volunteers, Americans of the World War I era created a new American state, and new ways of being American citizens.

Uncle Sam Wants You

World War I and the Making of the Modern American Citizen
Author: Christopher Capozzola
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780199734795
Category: History
Page: 334
View: 2242

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Daniel T. Rodgers, author of Atlantic Crossings: Social Politics in a Progressive Age --Book Jacket.

Making the Modern American Fiscal State

Law, Politics, and the Rise of Progressive Taxation, 1877–1929
Author: Ajay K. Mehrotra
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107436001
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 432
View: 4271

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At the turn of the twentieth century, the US system of public finance underwent a dramatic transformation. The late nineteenth-century regime of indirect, hidden, partisan, and regressive taxes was eclipsed in the early twentieth century by a direct, transparent, professionally administered, and progressive tax system. This book uncovers the contested roots and paradoxical consequences of this fundamental shift in American tax law and policy. It argues that the move toward a regime of direct and graduated taxation marked the emergence of a new fiscal polity - a new form of statecraft that was guided not simply by the functional need for greater revenue but by broader social concerns about economic justice, civic identity, bureaucratic capacity, and public power. Between the end of Reconstruction and the onset of the Great Depression, the intellectual, legal, and administrative foundations of the modern fiscal state first took shape. This book explains how and why this new fiscal polity came to be.

The Cambridge History of the First World War: Volume 1, Global War


Author: Jay Winter
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316025527
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 7948

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This first volume of The Cambridge History of the First World War provides a comprehensive account of the war's military history. An international team of leading historians charts how a war made possible by globalization and imperial expansion unfolded into catastrophe, growing year by year in scale and destructive power far beyond that which anyone had anticipated in 1914. Adopting a global perspective, the volume analyses the spatial impact of the war and the subsequent ripple effects that occurred both regionally and across the world. It explores how imperial powers devoted vast reserves of manpower and material to their war efforts and how, by doing so, they changed the political landscape of the world order. It also charts the moral, political and legal implications of the changing character of war and, in particular, the collapse of the distinction between civilian and military targets.

Any Way You Slice It

The Past, Present, and Future of Rationing
Author: Stan Cox
Publisher: New Press, The
ISBN: 1595588841
Category: Social Science
Page: 320
View: 6499

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Rationing: it’s a word—and idea—that people often loathe and fear. Health care expert Henry Aaron has compared mentioning the possibility of rationing to “shouting an obscenity in church.” Yet societies in fact ration food, water, medical care, and fuel all the time, with those who can pay the most getting the most. As Nobel Prize–winning economist Amartya Sen has said, the results can be “thoroughly unequal and nasty.” In Any Way You Slice It, Stan Cox shows that rationing is not just a quaint practice restricted to World War II memoirs and 1970s gas station lines. Instead, he persuasively argues that rationing is a vital concept for our fragile present, an era of dwindling resources and environmental crises. Any Way You Slice It takes us on a fascinating search for alternative ways of apportioning life’s necessities, from the goal of “fair shares for all” during wartime in the 1940s to present-day water rationing in a Mumbai slum, from the bread shops of Cairo to the struggle for fairness in American medicine and carbon rationing on Norfolk Island in the Pacific. Cox’s question: can we limit consumption while assuring everyone a fair share? The author of Losing Our Cool, the much debated and widely acclaimed examination of air-conditioning’s many impacts, here turns his attention to the politically explosive topic of how we share our planet’s resources.

Sowing the Seeds of Victory

American Gardening Programs of World War I
Author: Rose Hayden-Smith
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 0786470208
Category: Social Science
Page: 264
View: 1831

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“Rose Hayden-Smith has done us a great service in researching a history that has been hidden in plain sight, right beneath our feet. This book is a great place to start for anyone interested in the U.S. gardening movement, not just for historical interest but because it’s a subject, as her treatment of gender shows, that couldn’t be more relevant today.”—Raj Patel, author “With this landmark book, Rose Hayden-Smith has kept the American food movement from suffering a sort of amnesia that could cripple current and future initiatives if we persisted with our lack of familiarity with our precedents. Instead, this wonderfully written retrospective actually opens doors for gardeners, food activists and food security planners so that we might build upon the remarkable Victory Garden legacy she has so passionately described.”—Gary Paulk Nabhan, author Sometimes, to move forward, we must look back. Gardening activity during American involvement in World War I (1917-1919) is vital to understanding current work in agriculture and food systems. The origins of the American Victory Gardens of World War II lie in the Liberty Garden program during World War I. This book examines the National War Garden Commission, the United States School Garden Army, and the Woman's Land Army (which some women used to press for suffrage). The urgency of wartime mobilization enabled proponents to promote food production as a vital national security issue. The connection between the nation's food readiness and national security resonated within the U.S., struggling to unite urban and rural interests, grappling with the challenges presented by millions of immigrants, and considering the country's global role. The same message--that food production is vital to national security--can resonate today. These World War I programs resulted in a national gardening ethos that transformed the American food system.

Warfare State

World War II Americans and the Age of Big Government
Author: James T. Sparrow
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199831637
Category: Political Science
Page: 344
View: 1618

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Although common wisdom and much scholarship assume that "big government" gained its foothold in the United States under the auspices of the New Deal during the Great Depression, in fact it was the Second World War that accomplished this feat. Indeed, as the federal government mobilized for war it grew tenfold, quickly dwarfing the New Deal's welfare programs. Warfare State shows how the federal government vastly expanded its influence over American society during World War II. Equally important, it looks at how and why Americans adapted to this expansion of authority. Through mass participation in military service, war work, rationing, price control, income taxation, and the war bond program, ordinary Americans learned to live with the warfare state. They accepted these new obligations because the government encouraged all citizens to think of themselves as personally connected to the battle front, linking their every action to the fate of the combat soldier. As they worked for the American Soldier, Americans habituated themselves to the authority of the government. Citizens made their own counter-claims on the state-particularly in the case of industrial workers, women, African Americans, and most of all, the soldiers. Their demands for fuller citizenship offer important insights into the relationship between citizen morale, the uses of patriotism, and the legitimacy of the state in wartime. World War II forged a new bond between citizens, nation, and government. Warfare State tells the story of this dramatic transformation in American life.

Racism in the Nation's Service

Government Workers and the Color Line in Woodrow Wilson's America
Author: Eric S. Yellin
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469607212
Category: Social Science
Page: 320
View: 5094

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Between the 1880s and 1910s, thousands of African Americans passed civil service exams and became employed in the executive offices of the federal government. However, by 1920, promotions to well-paying federal jobs had nearly vanished for black workers. Eric S. Yellin argues that the Wilson administration's successful 1913 drive to segregate the federal government was a pivotal episode in the age of progressive politics. Yellin investigates how the enactment of this policy, based on Progressives' demands for whiteness in government, imposed a color line on American opportunity and implicated Washington in the economic limitation of African Americans for decades to come. Using vivid accounts of the struggles and protests of African American government employees, Yellin reveals the racism at the heart of the era's reform politics. He illuminates the nineteenth-century world of black professional labor and social mobility in Washington, D.C., and uncovers the Wilson administration's progressive justifications for unraveling that world. From the hopeful days following emancipation to the white-supremacist "normalcy" of the 1920s, Yellin traces the competing political ideas, politicians, and ordinary government workers who created "federal segregation."

Eastwood's Iwo Jima

Critical Engagements with Flags of Our Fathers and Letters from Iwo Jima
Author: Anne Gjelsvik,Rikke Schubart
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231850433
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 256
View: 4969

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With Flags of Our Fathers (2006) and Letters from Iwo Jima (2006), Clint Eastwood made a unique contribution to film history, being the first director to make two films about the same event. Eastwood's films examine the battle over Iwo Jima from two nations' perspectives, in two languages, and embody a passionate view on conflict, enemies, and heroes. Together these works tell the story behind one of history's most famous photographs, Leo Rosenthal's "Raising the Flag on Iwo Jima." In this volume, international scholars in political science and film, literary, and cultural studies undertake multifaceted investigations into how Eastwood's diptych reflects war today. Fifteen essays explore the intersection among war films, American history, and Japanese patriotism. They present global attitudes toward war memories, icons, and heroism while offering new perspectives on cinema, photography, journalism, ethics, propaganda, war strategy, leadership, and the war on terror.

Commonsense Anticommunism

Labor and Civil Liberties between the World Wars
Author: Jennifer Luff
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807869899
Category: History
Page: 304
View: 9346

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Between the Great War and Pearl Harbor, conservative labor leaders declared themselves America's "first line of defense" against Communism. In this surprising account, Jennifer Luff shows how the American Federation of Labor fanned popular anticommunism but defended Communists' civil liberties in the aftermath of the 1919 Red Scare. The AFL's "commonsense anticommunism," she argues, steered a middle course between the American Legion and the ACLU, helping to check campaigns for federal sedition laws. But in the 1930s, frustration with the New Deal order led labor conservatives to redbait the Roosevelt administration and liberal unionists and abandon their reluctant civil libertarianism for red scare politics. That frustration contributed to the legal architecture of federal anticommunism that culminated with the McCarthyist fervor of the 1950s. Relying on untapped archival sources, Luff reveals how labor conservatives and the emerging civil liberties movement debated the proper role of the state in policing radicals and grappled with the challenges to the existing political order posed by Communist organizers. Surprising conclusions about familiar figures, like J. Edgar Hoover, and unfamiliar episodes, like a German plot to disrupt American munitions manufacture, make Luff's story a fresh retelling of the interwar years.

Europas letzter Sommer

die scheinbar friedlichen Wochen vor dem Ersten Weltkrieg
Author: David Fromkin
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9783896671837
Category:
Page: 414
View: 5727

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Das Panoptikum


Author: Jeremy Bentham
Publisher: Matthes & Seitz Berlin Verlag
ISBN: 388221113X
Category: Philosophy
Page: 221
View: 9599

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Überwachen und Strafen Im Panoptikum, Jeremy Benthams idealem Gefängnis- und Erziehungsbau, werden die Delinquenten permanenter Überwachung durch einen Aufseher unterzogen, der im Mittelpunkt eines kreisförmigen Gebäudes sitzt. Aber zu welchem Zweck? Michel Foucault interpretierte in seinem Werk Überwachen und Strafen (1975) Benthams Bau als Prototyp für die latente Perversion bürgerlicher Aufklärung, die Schizophrenie eines Liberalismus, der stets das Gute will und stets das Böse schafft. Aber stimmt das wirklich? Die erste deutsche Übersetzung von Panoptikum offenbart die Aktualität von Benthams Gedankenwelt. Als Begründer des Utilitarismus und Anhänger des Wirtschaftsliberalismus war er davon überzeugt, dass der Kapitalismus der wahre Schlüssel zum Glück des Menschen ist - und nichts anderes als den Weg zum Glück wollte er mit dem Panoptikum jedem Menschen ebnen. Ebook-Version ohne Interview mit Michel Foucault.

Deutsch-Amerikaner im Ersten Weltkrieg

US-Politik und nationale Identitäten im Mittleren Westen
Author: Katja Wüstenbecker
Publisher: Franz Steiner Verlag Wiesbaden gmbh
ISBN: 9783515089753
Category: History
Page: 428
View: 4790

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A study on German-Americans in the Midwestern United States during World War I and the attitudes towards them in times of war. German text.

So fern wie nah


Author: John Boyne
Publisher: S. Fischer Verlag
ISBN: 3104030154
Category: Juvenile Fiction
Page: 256
View: 6131

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Der Autor des Weltbestsellers ›Der Junge im gestreiften Pyjama‹ schreibt über den Ersten Weltkrieg Als an Alfies fünftem Geburtstag der Erste Weltkrieg ausbricht, verspricht sein Vater, nicht in dem Kampf zu ziehen – und bricht sein Wort am Tag darauf. Vier harte Jahre später geht Alfie heimlich arbeiten, um seine Mutter zu unterstützen. Er ist davon überzeugt, dass er seinen Vater nie wiedersehen wird. Doch dann erfährt Alfie zufällig, dass sein Vater in einer Klinik für traumatisierte Soldaten behandelt wird. Und er beschließt, ihn nach Hause zu holen ...

Die Hälfte des Himmels

wie Frauen weltweit für eine bessere Zukunft kämpfen
Author: Nicholas D. Kristof,Sheryl WuDunn
Publisher: C.H.Beck
ISBN: 9783406606380
Category:
Page: 359
View: 4044

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Woodrow Wilson

Amerika und die Neuordnung der Welt
Author: Manfred Berg
Publisher: C.H.Beck
ISBN: 3406707793
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 277
View: 7678

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Er war einer der Architekten des modernen Amerika und eine der prägenden Figuren des 20. Jahrhunderts: Woodrow Wilson inspirierte zu seiner Zeit weltweit jene Menschen, die nach einer gerechteren Weltordnung strebten. Manfred Berg zeichnet ein lebendiges Porträt dieses globalen Superstars und zeigt, warum sich die Beschäftigung mit ihm und seiner Zeit gerade in der heutigen Weltunordnung lohnt. Woodrow Wilson führte die USA in den Ersten Weltkrieg und wurde zwischen 1917 und 1919 zur Schlüsselfigur der Weltpolitik. Menschen auf der ganzen Welt erhofften sich von ihm Frieden und Gerechtigkeit. Doch seine Vision einer internationalen Ordnung, die auf kollektive Sicherheit, nationale Selbstbestimmung, freien Handel und Demokratie gebaut sein sollte, scheiterte – mit dramatischen Folgen für den weiteren Verlauf der Weltgeschichte. Diese erste deutschsprachige Biographie seit Jahrzehnten verfolgt den Lebensweg dieses wortgewaltigen Intellektuellen, der viele Jahre die Universität Princeton leitete, Millionen Menschen mit seinen Ideen begeisterte, aber auch den Rassismus seiner Zeit teilte und der Welt ein bis heute wirkendes, zwiespältiges Erbe hinterließ.