From Ulster to America

The Scotch-Irish Heritage of American English
Author: Michael Montgomery
Publisher: Ulster Historical Foundation
ISBN: 9781903688618
Category: Foreign Language Study
Page: 210
View: 2671

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Over the last 350 years, Ireland has sent a constant stream of emigrants to North America. Estimates range from 6 to 10 million. Each emigrant spoke English, Irish, or Ulster Scots. Many indeed used two of these tongues. One of the most formative chapters in this fascinating story is the often-overlooked arrival of perhaps 200,000 people from Ulster in the colonial era, specifically in the sixty years before the American Revolution. This book recounts the lasting impact they made on the development of the,English language of the United States from the 18th century to the present day. It documents nearly 400 terms and meanings, each with quotations from both sides of the Atlantic, that were contributed to American English by these 18th-century settlers from Ulster. Drawing on letters they sent back to their homeland and on other archival documents associated with their settlement, including local fiction and poetry, it shows that Ulster emigrants and their children, who settled mainly in the American interior, gave as much to regional American English as any other group from the Old World. Its pages contain many pleasant surprises: readers will find terms both instantly recognisable and unfamiliar. The numerous quotations not only bring alive the speech of earlier days on both sides of the Atlantic but also extend our understanding of the culture, mannerisms and life of those pioneering times and, through the spoken and written word, poignantly link the past with the present.

Ulster to America

The Scots-Irish Migration Experience, 1680–1830
Author: Warren R. Hofstra
Publisher: Univ. of Tennessee Press
ISBN: 1572338326
Category: History
Page: 292
View: 3418

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In Ulster to America: The Scots-Irish Migration Experience, 1680–1830, editor Warren R. Hofstra has gathered contributions from pioneering scholars who are rewriting the history of the Scots-Irish. In addition to presenting fresh information based on thorough and detailed research, they offer cutting-edge interpretations that help explain the Scots-Irish experience in the United States. In place of implacable Scots-Irish individualism, the writers stress the urge to build communities among Ulster immigrants. In place of rootlessness and isolation, the authors point to the trans-Atlantic continuity of Scots-Irish settlement and the presence of Germans and Anglo-Americans in so-called Scots-Irish areas. In a variety of ways, the book asserts, the Scots-Irish actually modified or abandoned some of their own cultural traits as a result of interacting with people of other backgrounds and in response to many of the main themes defining American history. While the Scots-Irish myth has proved useful over time to various groups with their own agendas—including modern-day conservatives and fundamentalist Christians—this book, by clearing away long-standing but erroneous ideas about the Scots-Irish, represents a major advance in our understanding of these immigrants. It also places Scots-Irish migration within the broader context of the historiographical construct of the Atlantic world. Organized in chronological and migratory order, this volume includes contributions on specific U.S. centers for Ulster immigrants: New Castle, Delaware; Donegal Springs, Pennsylvania; Carlisle, Pennsylvania; Opequon, Virginia; the Virginia frontier; the Carolina backcountry; southwestern Pennsylvania, and Kentucky. Ulster to America is essential reading for scholars and students of American history, immigration history, local history, and the colonial era, as well as all those who seek a fuller understanding of the Scots-Irish immigrant story.

Scotch Irish Pioneers In Ulster And America


Author: Charles Knowles Bolton
Publisher: Read Books Ltd
ISBN: 1446549267
Category: History
Page: 412
View: 7898

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Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

The Scottish Settlers of America

The 17th and 18th Centuries
Author: Stephen M. Millett
Publisher: Genealogical Publishing Com
ISBN: 0806347619
Category: History
Page: 234
View: 5510

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Drawing upon research conducted in both Scotland and the United States in manuscript and in published sources, David Dobson has here amassed all the genealogical data that we know of concerning members of the Society of Friends in Scotland prior to 1700 and the origins of Scottish Quakers living in East New Jersey in the 1680s. While there is great deal of variation in the descriptions of the roughly 500 Scottish Quakers listed in the volume, the entries typically give the individual's name, date or place of birth, and occupation, and sometimes the name of a spouse or date of marriage, name of parents, place and reason for imprisonment in Scotland, place of indenture, date of death, and the source of the information.

The People with No Name

Ireland's Ulster Scots, America's Scots Irish, and the Creation of a British Atlantic World, 1689-1764
Author: Patrick Griffin
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400842891
Category: History
Page: 264
View: 3665

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More than 100,000 Ulster Presbyterians of Scottish origin migrated to the American colonies in the six decades prior to the American Revolution, the largest movement of any group from the British Isles to British North America in the eighteenth century. Drawing on a vast store of archival materials, The People with No Name is the first book to tell this fascinating story in its full, transatlantic context. It explores how these people--whom one visitor to their Pennsylvania enclaves referred to as ''a spurious race of mortals known by the appellation Scotch-Irish''--drew upon both Old and New World experiences to adapt to staggering religious, economic, and cultural change. In remarkably crisp, lucid prose, Patrick Griffin uncovers the ways in which migrants from Ulster--and thousands like them--forged new identities and how they conceived the wider transatlantic community. The book moves from a vivid depiction of Ulster and its Presbyterian community in and after the Glorious Revolution to a brilliant account of religion and identity in early modern Ireland. Griffin then deftly weaves together religion and economics in the origins of the transatlantic migration, and examines how this traumatic and enlivening experience shaped patterns of settlement and adaptation in colonial America. In the American side of his story, he breaks new critical ground for our understanding of colonial identity formation and of the place of the frontier in a larger empire. The People with No Name will be indispensable reading for anyone interested in transatlantic history, American Colonial history, and the history of Irish and British migration.

Ireland and Irish America

Culture, Class, and Transatlantic Migration
Author: Kerby A. Miller
Publisher: Field Day Publications
ISBN: 0946755396
Category: Ireland
Page: 411
View: 2970

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Between 1600 and 1929, perhaps seven million men and women left Ireland and crossed the Atlantic. Ireland and Irish America is concerned with Catholics and Protestants, rural and urban dwellers, men and women on both sides of that vast ocean. Drawing on over thirty years of research, in sources as disparate as emigrants' letters and demographic data, it recovers the experiences and opinions of emigrants as varied as the Rev. James McGregor, who in 1718 led the first major settlement of Presbyterians from Ulster to the New World, Mary Rush, a desperate refugee from the Great Famine in County Sligo, and Tom Brick, an Irish-speaking Kerryman on the American prairie in the early 1900s. Above all, Ireland and Irish America offers a trenchant analysis of mass migration's causes, its consequences, and its popular and political interpretations. In the process, it challenges the conventional 'two traditions' (Protestant versus Catholic) paradigm of Irish and Irish diasporan history, and it illuminates the hegemonic forces and relationships that governed the Irish and Irish-American worlds created and linked by transatlantic capitalism.

Wayfaring Strangers

The Musical Voyage from Scotland and Ulster to Appalachia
Author: Fiona Ritchie,Doug Orr
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469618230
Category: Music
Page: 384
View: 1620

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Throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, a steady stream of Scots migrated to Ulster and eventually onward across the Atlantic to resettle in the United States. Many of these Scots-Irish immigrants made their way into the mountains of the southern Appalachian region. They brought with them a wealth of traditional ballads and tunes from the British Isles and Ireland, a carrying stream that merged with sounds and songs of English, German, Welsh, African American, French, and Cherokee origin. Their enduring legacy of music flows today from Appalachia back to Ireland and Scotland and around the globe. In Wayfaring Strangers, Fiona Ritchie and Doug Orr guide readers on a musical voyage across oceans, linking people and songs through centuries of adaptation and change. From ancient ballads at the heart of the tradition to instruments that express this dynamic music, Ritchie and Orr chronicle the details of an epic journey. Enriched by the insights of key contributors to the living tradition on both sides of the Atlantic, this abundantly illustrated volume includes a CD featuring 20 songs by musicians profiled in the book, including Dolly Parton, Dougie MacLean, Cara Dillon, John Doyle, Pete Seeger, Sheila Kay Adams, Jean Ritchie, Doc Watson, David Holt, Anais Mitchell, Al Petteway, and Amy White.

Essays in Scotch-Irish History


Author: Edward Rodney Richey Green,Queen's University of Belfast,Ulster-Scot Historical Foundation
Publisher: Ulster Historical Foundation
ISBN: 9780901905536
Category: History
Page: 110
View: 6900

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This is a reprint of the second volume in the Ulster Historical Foundation's Historical Series, which was first published in 1969. These five essays were delivered as lectures at a conference on the Scotch-Irish held in Belfast in 1965. This edition contains a new introduction by Steve Ickringill of the University of Ulster re-viewing recent research. The first essay is an examination of President Woodrow Wilson's Scots and Scotch-Irish inheritance of family and religious traditions. He is shown as typifying almost all aspects of the remarkable Scots and Scotch-Irish legacy to American society, culture and politics. The next paper considers the educational contribution of the Scotch-Irish to colonial America, beginning with elementary church schools and academies for preparing young men for the ministry, and proceeding to the most important institution, Princeton, decisively Presbyterian and Scots in character. A neglected period in the study of Irish emigration is covered in an essay on Ulster Emigration to America, 1783-1815; this shows that emigration continued on a large scale after 1783 in spite of British Government restrictions, and that these emigrants like their predecessors, immediately assumed loyalty to their adopted country, notably in the war of 1812. The fourth paper argues that perhaps the most important aspect of the influence of the Scotch-Irish in the making of the United States was not so much their contribution to leadership in politics and education as in their shaping of the patterns of settlement and land-use. The final essay, on Ulster's emigrant's letters, points to the value of these documents as sources of information on the emigrant experience, both social and economic.

Ulster-American religion

episodes in the history of a cultural connection
Author: David N. Livingstone,Ronald Wells
Publisher: Univ of Notre Dame Pr
ISBN: 9780268043032
Category: Political Science
Page: 201
View: 1127

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Ulster-American Religion recounts the attempt by Presbyterian leaders to use their religious belief as a self-chosen ground on which to contend for societal leadership. In Ulster and America over the last century and a half, a hoped-for Presbyterian dominion was seen as the desire to give society moral leadership. Livingstone and Wells suggest that this leadership offered by Presbyterians was, over time, accorded increasingly less welcome by outside organizations in the two societies. Both conservative and evangelical Presbyterians came to believe that the tide of history in the modern world was against them and their moral vision. Those who saw themselves as naturally appointed leaders in education, science, theology, and politics were puzzled, even saddened, by challenges to that leadership. For them, it was essential to maintain the boundaries of the mind, the spirit, and the nation.Ulster-American Religion is a salient observation on the history of the cultural connections between Ulster and America for students of history, theology, politics, sociology, and Irish studies.

The American Presence in Ulster

A Diplomatic History, 1796-1996
Author: Francis M. Carroll
Publisher: CUA Press
ISBN: 0813214203
Category: History
Page: 281
View: 7060

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Tells the story of the link between Ulster and the United States and presents the first general history of the U.S. Consulate in Belfast.

The Scotch-Irish in America


Author: Henry Jones Ford
Publisher: Genealogical Publishing Com
ISBN: 0806345233
Category: Reference
Page: 607
View: 958

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The Scotch-Irish in America tells the story of the Ulster Plantation and of the influences that formed the character of the Scotch-Irish people. The author commences with a detailed discussion of the events leading to the Scottish migration to Ulster in the seventeenth century, followed by an examination of the causes of the secondary exodus of these same "Scotch-Irish" to North America before the end of the century. Entire chapters are then devoted to the Scotch-Irish settlement in New England, New York, the Jerseys, Pennsylvania, and along the colonial frontier. Special chapters take up the role of the Scotch-Irish in the development of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S., the Scotch-Irish in the American Revolution, and the role of the Scotch-Irish in the spread of popular education in America.

The Scotch-Irish

A Social History
Author: James G. Leyburn
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 9780807842591
Category: History
Page: 377
View: 7208

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Dispelling much of what he terms the 'mythology' of the Scotch-Irish, James Leyburn provides an absorbing account of their heritage. He discusses their life in Scotland, when the essentials of their character and culture were shaped; their removal to Northern Ireland and the action of their residence in that region upon their outlook on life; and their successive migrations to America, where they settled especially in the back-country of Pennsylvania, Virginia, the Carolinas, and Georgia, and then after the Revolutionary War were in the van of pioneers to the west.

Ulster Sails West

The Story of the Great Emigration from Ulster to North America in the 18th Century, Together with an Outline of the Part Played by Ulstermen in Building the United States
Author: William Forbes Marshall
Publisher: Genealogical Publishing Com
ISBN: 9780806307541
Category: History
Page: 79
View: 4646

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The emigration of people from Ulster (Northern Ireland) and their contributions to the development of the American Colonies.

Ulster and North America

Transatlantic Perspectives on the Scotch-Irish
Author: T. G. Fraser
Publisher: University Alabama Press
ISBN: 9780817311353
Category: History
Page: 296
View: 4441

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This collection of thought-provoking essays addresses the complex issues of Ulster Scots history and ethnic identity by viewing them from a transatlantic and comparative perspective. The 11 essays in this volume, originally presented at meetings of the Ulster-American Heritage Symposium by scholars from Scotland, Ireland, Canada, and the United States, explore the nature of Scotch-Irish culture by examining values, traditions, demographics, and language. The essays also investigate the process of migration, which transmitted that culture to the New World, and the subsequent assimilation of Celtic ways into American culture. The themes presented are wide-ranging and complex. First is the dynamic nature of Ulster society in the 17th and 18th centuries and the rapid changes occurring there, especially those affecting Presbyterianism and community cohesiveness. Also examined is the experience of migration, asking such questions as who migrated and when, what their expectations were, and how closely colonial reality matched those expectations. A third theme is the development of economic strategies and community-building both in Ulster and North America, making important contributions to the "new rural history" and explaining the success of the Scotch-Irish on the American frontier. Finally, the volume addresses ethnic identity and cultural diffusion, advancing the ongoing debate initiated by Forrest McDonald and Grady McWhiney and elaborated on by David Hackett Fischer. Ulster and North America illustrates the value of transatlantic dialog and of comparative studies for the understanding of ethnicity and migration history.

Ulster Presbyterians and the Scots Irish Diaspora, 1750-1764


Author: B. Bankhurst
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137328207
Category: History
Page: 202
View: 3085

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Bankhurst examines how news regarding the violent struggle to control the borderlands of British North America between 1740 and 1760 resonated among communities in Ireland with familial links to the colonies. This work considers how intense Irish press coverage and American fundraising drives in Ireland produced empathy among Ulster Presbyterians.

The American Irish

A History
Author: Kevin Kenny
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317889150
Category: History
Page: 358
View: 4554

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The American Irish: A History, is the first concise, general history of its subject in a generation. It provides a long-overdue synthesis of Irish-American history from the beginnings of emigration in the early eighteenth century to the present day. While most previous accounts of the subject have concentrated on the nineteenth century, and especially the period from the famine (1840s) to Irish independence (1920s), The American Irish: A History incorporates the Ulster Protestant emigration of the eighteenth century and is the first book to include extensive coverage of the twentieth century. Drawing on the most innovative scholarship from both sides of the Atlantic in the last generation, the book offers an extended analysis of the conditions in Ireland that led to mass migration and examines the Irish immigrant experience in the United States in terms of arrival and settlement, social mobility and assimilation, labor, race, gender, politics, and nationalism. It is ideal for courses on Irish history, Irish-American history, and the history of American immigration more generally.

Familia 2001: Ulster Geneological Review: Number 17


Author: Trevor Parkhill
Publisher: Ulster Historical Foundation
ISBN: 9781903688168
Category: History
Page: 101
View: 9588

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Familia, which was first published in 1985, aims to provide informed writing on sources and case studies relating to that area where Irish history and genealogy overlap with mutual benefit. Members of the Foundation's Guild receive Familia and the Directory of Irish Family History Research as part of the return on their annual subscription.