Toxic Charity

How Churches and Charities Hurt Those They Help (And How to Reverse It)
Author: Robert D. Lupton
Publisher: HarperOne
ISBN: 9780062076212
Category: Social Science
Page: 208
View: 4330

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Public service is a way of life for Americans; giving is a part of our national character. But compassionate instincts and generous spirits aren’t enough, says veteran urban activist Robert D. Lupton. In this groundbreaking guide, he reveals the disturbing truth about charity: all too much of it has become toxic, devastating to the very people it’s meant to help. In his four decades of urban ministry, Lupton has experienced firsthand how our good intentions can have unintended, dire consequences. Our free food and clothing distribution encourages ever-growing handout lines, diminishing the dignity of the poor while increasing their dependency. We converge on inner-city neighborhoods to plant flowers and pick up trash, battering the pride of residents who have the capacity (and responsibility) to beautify their own environment. We fly off on mission trips to poverty-stricken villages, hearts full of pity and suitcases bulging with giveaways—trips that one Nicaraguan leader describes as effective only in “turning my people into beggars.” In Toxic Charity, Lupton urges individuals, churches, and organizations to step away from these spontaneous, often destructive acts of compassion toward thoughtful paths to community development. He delivers proven strategies for moving from toxic charity to transformative charity. Proposing a powerful “Oath for Compassionate Service” and spotlighting real-life examples of people serving not just with their hearts but with proven strategies and tested tactics, Lupton offers all the tools and inspiration we need to develop healthy, community-driven programs that produce deep, measurable, and lasting change. Everyone who volunteers or donates to charity needs to wrestle with this book.

Toxic Charity

How Churches and Charities Hurt Those They Help (And How to Reverse It)
Author: Robert D. Lupton
Publisher: HarperOne
ISBN: 9780062076205
Category: Social Science
Page: 208
View: 4456

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Public service is a way of life for Americans; giving is a part of our national character. But compassionate instincts and generous spirits aren’t enough, says veteran urban activist Robert D. Lupton. In this groundbreaking guide, he reveals the disturbing truth about charity: all too much of it has become toxic, devastating to the very people it’s meant to help. In his four decades of urban ministry, Lupton has experienced firsthand how our good intentions can have unintended, dire consequences. Our free food and clothing distribution encourages ever-growing handout lines, diminishing the dignity of the poor while increasing their dependency. We converge on inner-city neighborhoods to plant flowers and pick up trash, battering the pride of residents who have the capacity (and responsibility) to beautify their own environment. We fly off on mission trips to poverty-stricken villages, hearts full of pity and suitcases bulging with giveaways—trips that one Nicaraguan leader describes as effective only in “turning my people into beggars.” In Toxic Charity, Lupton urges individuals, churches, and organizations to step away from these spontaneous, often destructive acts of compassion toward thoughtful paths to community development. He delivers proven strategies for moving from toxic charity to transformative charity. Proposing a powerful “Oath for Compassionate Service” and spotlighting real-life examples of people serving not just with their hearts but with proven strategies and tested tactics, Lupton offers all the tools and inspiration we need to develop healthy, community-driven programs that produce deep, measurable, and lasting change. Everyone who volunteers or donates to charity needs to wrestle with this book.

When Helping Hurts

How to Alleviate Poverty Without Hurting the Poor . . . and Yourself
Author: Steve Corbett,Brian Fikkert
Publisher: Moody Publishers
ISBN: 0802487629
Category: Religion
Page: 288
View: 8664

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With more than 300,000 copies in print, When Helping Hurts is a paradigm-forming contemporary classic on the subject of poverty alleviation. Poverty is much more than simply a lack of material resources, and it takes much more than donations and handouts to solve it. When Helping Hurts shows how some alleviation efforts, failing to consider the complexities of poverty, have actually (and unintentionally) done more harm than good. But it looks ahead. It encourages us to see the dignity in everyone, to empower the materially poor, and to know that we are all uniquely needy—and that God in the gospel is reconciling all things to himself. Focusing on both North American and Majority World contexts, When Helping Hurts provides proven strategies for effective poverty alleviation, catalyzing the idea that sustainable change comes not from the outside in, but from the inside out.

Compassion, Justice and the Christian Life

Rethinking Ministry to the Poor (Large Print 16pt)
Author: Robert D. Lupton
Publisher: ReadHowYouWant.com
ISBN: 145960668X
Category:
Page: 176
View: 1252

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Rethinking Ministry to the Poor The urban landscape is changing and, as a result, urban ministries are at a crossroads. If the Church is to be an effective agent of compassion and justice, we must change our mission strategies. In this compelling book, Lupton asks tough questions about service providing and community building to help us enhance our effectiveness. Among the questions; What dilemmas do caring people encounter to faithfully carry out the teachings of Scripture and become personally involved with the least of these? What are some possible alternatives to the ways we have traditionally attempted to care for the poor? How do people, programs and neighborhoods move toward reciprocal, interdependent relationships? To effect these types of changes will require new skill sets and resources, but the possibilities for good are great.

Toxic Charity

How the Church Hurts Those They Help and How to Reverse It
Author: Robert D. Lupton
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062076221
Category: Social Science
Page: 208
View: 1950

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Veteran urban activist Robert Lupton reveals the shockingly toxic effects that modern charity has upon the very people meant to benefit from it. Toxic Charity provides proven new models for charitable groups who want to help—not sabotage—those whom they desire to serve. Lupton, the founder of FCS Urban Ministries (Focused Community Strategies) in Atlanta, the voice of the Urban Perspectives newsletter, and the author of Compassion, Justice and the Christian Life, has been at the forefront of urban ministry activism for forty years. Now, in the vein of Jeffrey Sachs’s The End of Poverty, Richard Stearns’s The Hole in Our Gospel, and Gregory Boyle’s Tattoos on the Heart, his groundbreaking Toxic Charity shows us how to start serving needy and impoverished members of our communities in a way that will lead to lasting, real-world change.

Charity Detox

What Charity Would Look Like If We Cared About Results
Author: Robert D. Lupton
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062307290
Category: Social Science
Page: 208
View: 1517

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The veteran urban activist and author of the revolutionary Toxic Charity returns with a headline-making book that offers proven, results-oriented ideas for transforming our system of giving. In Toxic Charity, Robert D. Lupton revealed the truth about modern charity programs meant to help the poor and disenfranchised. While charity makes donors feel better, he argued, it often hurts those it seeks to help. At the forefront of this burgeoning yet ineffective compassion industry are American churches, which spend billions on dependency-producing programs, including food pantries. But what would charity look like if we, instead, measured it by its ability to alleviate poverty and needs? That is the question at the heart of Charity Detox. Drawing on his many decades of experience, Lupton outlines how to structure programs that actually improve the quality of life of the poor and disenfranchised. He introduces many strategies that are revolutionizing what we do with our charity dollars, and offers numerous examples of organizations that have successfully adopted these groundbreaking new models. Only by redirecting our strategies and becoming committed to results, he argues, can charity enterprises truly become as transformative as our ideals.

Making Neighborhoods Whole

A Handbook for Christian Community Development
Author: Wayne Gordon,John M. Perkins
Publisher: InterVarsity Press
ISBN: 0830895779
Category: Religion
Page: 182
View: 9632

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Already with decades of experience speaking prophetically into the charged racial climate of the American south, John Perkins began to see a need for organized thinking and collaborative imagination about how the church engages urban ministry. And so the Christian Community Development Association (CCDA) was born, with Wayne Gordon an immediate and enthusiastic participant. Nearly thirty years later CCDA s eight key components of community development still set the bar for how churches, parachurches and nonprofits engage cities with the whole gospel. Relocation Reconciliation Redistribution Leadership Development Listening to the Community Church-Based Development A Wholistic Approach to Ministry Empowerment In Making Neighborhoods Whole Perkins and Gordon revisit these eight commitments and how they've played out in real communities, even as they scan the horizon of urban ministry to set a new tone. With profiles of longstanding and emerging community development ministries, they guide a new conversation and empower disciples of Jesus to seek the welfare of their cities to the glory of God.

Trolls and Truth

14 Realities about Today's Church That We Don't Want to See
Author: Jimmy Dorrell
Publisher: New Hope Publishers
ISBN: 9781596690103
Category: Religion
Page: 215
View: 4733

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Trolls & Truth is the story of a local church of homeless people; college students; middle-class Christians; some poor and some rich; black, white, and brown; drunks; materialists; mentally ill; and former inmates who meet beneath the noise of 18-wheelers and rushing traffic under an interstate bridge in Waco, Texas. As they live out biblical mandates across cultural barriers and institutional baggage, they remind us that the gospel cannot be shaped by socially accepted values and remain "good news."

Celebrity Humanitarianism

The Ideology of Global Charity
Author: Ilan Kapoor
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0415783380
Category: POLITICAL SCIENCE
Page: 145
View: 6770

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In the last two decades especially, we have witnessed the rise of ‘celebrity’ forms of global humanitarianism and charity work, spearheaded by entertainment stars, billionaires, and activist NGOs (e.g. Bob Geldof, Bono, Angelina Jolie, Madonna, Bill Gates, George Soros, Save Darfur, Medeçins Sans Frontières). This book examines this new phenomenon, arguing that celebrity humanitarianism legitimates, and indeed promotes, neoliberal capitalism and global inequality. Drawing on Slavoj iek’s work, the book argues how celebrity humanitarianism, far from being altruistic, is significantly contaminated and ideological: it is most often self-serving, helping to promote institutional aggrandizement and the celebrity ‘brand’; it advances consumerism and corporate capitalism, and rationalizes the very global inequality it seeks to redress; it is fundamentally depoliticizing, despite its pretensions to ‘activism’; and it contributes to a ‘postdemocratic’ political landscape, which appears outwardly open and consensual, but is in fact managed by unaccountable elites.

Walking with the Poor

Principles and Practices of Transformational Development
Author: Bryant L. Myers
Publisher: Orbis Books
ISBN: 1608330567
Category: Religion
Page: 386
View: 9396

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In this revised and updated edition of a modern classic, Bryant Myers shows how Christian mission can contribute to dismantling poverty and social evil. Myers demonstrates what is possible when we cease to treat the spiritual and physical domains of life as separate and unrelated.

Helping Without Hurting in Church Benevolence

A Practical Guide to Walking with Low-Income People
Author: Steve Corbett,Brian Fikkert
Publisher: Moody Publishers
ISBN: 0802493440
Category: Religion
Page: 160
View: 7627

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When a low-income person asks your church for help, what do you do next? God is extraordinarily generous, and our churches should be, too. Because poverty is complex, however, helping low-income people often requires going beyond meeting their material needs to holistically addressing the roots of their poverty. But on a practical level, how do you move forward in walking with someone who approaches your church for financial help? From the authors of When Helping Hurts comes Helping Without Hurting in Church Benevolence, a guidebook for church staff, deacons, or volunteers who work with low-income people. Short and to the point, this tool provides foundational principles for poverty alleviation and then addresses practical matters, like: How to structure and focus your benevolence work How to respond to immediate needs while pursuing long-term solutions How to mobilize your church to walk with low-income people With practical stories, forms, and tools for churches to use, Helping Without Hurting in Church Benevolence is an all-in-one guide for church leaders and laypeople who want to help the poor in ways that lead to lasting change.

Chasing Contentment

Trusting God in a Discontented Age
Author: Erik Raymond
Publisher: Crossway
ISBN: 1433553694
Category: Religion
Page: 176
View: 9009

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Recovering the Lost Art of Contentment The biblical practice of contentment can seem like a lost art—something reserved for spiritual giants but out of reach for the rest of us. In our discontented age—characterized by impatience, overspending, grumbling, and unhappiness—it’s hard to imagine what true contentment actually looks (and feels) like. But even the apostle Paul said that he learned to be content in any and every circumstance. Paul’s remarkable contentment was something grown and developed over time. In Chasing Contentment, Erik Raymond helps us understand what biblical contentment is—the inward gracious spirit that joyfully rests in God’s providence—and then how we learn it. Giving us practical guidance for growing in contentment in various areas of our lives, this book will encourage us to see contentment as a priority for all believers. By God’s grace, it is possible to pursue the high calling of contentment and anchor our joy in God himself rather than our changing circumstances.

The Gospel According to Sesame Street: Learning, Life, Love, and Death


Author: Gary C. Dreibelbis
Publisher: WestBow Press
ISBN: 1512751146
Category: Religion
Page: 168
View: 5456

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Even more than the animated features of Walt Disney and certainly more than The Simpsons, Sesame Street has had a deep and enduring role in shaping young minds about faith and morality--well beyond Patti Labelles stirring gospel version of the alphabet. Gary Dreibelbis thoughful analysis of the Sesame Street Gospel is long overdue. - Mark I. Pinsky, The Gospel According to Disney, The Gospel According to The Simpsons What a unique and insightful book! Who would have imagined that behind the scenes of a cute kids program there was a deep reservoir of theological truth and moral teaching that has shaped mnds and hearts of millions of children? A fascinating read. - Robert Lupton, Toxic Charity: How Churches and Charities Hurt Those they Help and How to Reverse It. Not only is this a lesson in television history, it takes an iconic show and delves deeper into the moral and spiritual themes that lie just below the surface, giving us a new way to look at a special place called Sesame Street. - Tony Rossi, Director of Communication, The Christophers and National Catholic Radio Host During its forty-five seasons on air, Sesame Street has not only taught children letters of the alphabet and numbers, it has also taught children lessons in faith, equality, and social justice. Most of all it has taught children in subtle ways to follow The Golden Rule and that all people are created equal. It is without doubt one of the most significant television programs of all time.

What Every Pastor Should Know

101 Indispensable Rules of Thumb for Leading Your Church
Author: Gary L. McIntosh,Charles Arn
Publisher: Baker Books
ISBN: 1441241035
Category: Religion
Page: 272
View: 5669

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Pastors and church leaders are constantly faced with strategic questions. How much staff does the church need? How many workers are needed in the nursery this month? When is the right time to start a second worship service? How many people should we train for evangelism this year? How does seating and parking impact worship attendance? When church leaders have questions about planning, running, or growing their churches, they need answers fast! What Every Pastor Should Know offers pastors and leaders 101 valuable rules and "sacred" laws to help answer real-life ministry questions. From advertising to facilities to visitation, this valuable book offers the practical help that leaders need, just when they need it most. This comprehensive guide will become one of the most valuable books in a leader's library. Never again will they wonder if they based critical decisions on the right information. They'll get the answers they're looking for all in one place.

Helping Without Hurting in Short-Term Missions

Participant's Guide
Author: Steve Corbett,Brian Fikkert
Publisher: Moody Publishers
ISBN: 0802490255
Category: Religion
Page: 128
View: 4367

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When Helping Hurts is a paradigm-forming contemporary classic on the subject of poverty alleviation with over 300,000 copies in print. This stand-alone resource applies the principles of that book specifically to short-term missions. Helping Without Hurting in Short-Term Missions: Participant’s Guide aims to train and debrief team members, preparing them to do short-term missions as effectively as possible. To do this, it provides practical examples and guidelines for team members, and it creates interaction and reflection opportunities through questions and journaling. With eight units, six of which are built around free online video content, this book equips teams to avoid harming materially poor communities and to translate their experience into lasting and mutual engagement with missions and poverty alleviation. In conjunction with the separately available Leader’s Guide, it is an ideal resource for churches, Christian colleges, mission agencies, and missionaries.

Renewing the City

Reflections on Community Development and Urban Renewal
Author: Robert D. Lupton
Publisher: InterVarsity Press
ISBN: 9780830833269
Category: Religion
Page: 240
View: 2834

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Community developer and urban activist Robert D. Lupton looks to the Old Testament example of Nehemiah as a role model for community transformation and renewal.

Restoring At-Risk Communities

Doing It Together and Doing It Right
Author: John M. Perkins
Publisher: Baker Books
ISBN: 1585581488
Category: Religion
Page: 266
View: 7432

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This comprehensive handbook to urban ministry introduces and shows how to implement a Christian community development program.

From Aid to Trade

How Aid Organizations, Businesses, and Governments Can Work Together: Lessons Learned from Haiti
Author: Daniel Jean-Louis,Jacqueline Klamer
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780998004402
Category:
Page: 248
View: 2244

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Why do poor countries remain poor? Why, after receiving billions of dollars, do poor countries remain poor? Why are failing foreign aid models utilized over and over again? After the devastating 2010 Haiti earthquake, authors Daniel Jean-Louis and Jacqueline Klamer observed first-hand the negative consequences of donations provided with the sincerest of good intentions donations that ultimately undermined local industries and wiped out jobs. Based on primary research and in-depth case studies, and personal experience, From Aid to Trade offers practical, achievable solutions to help Haiti and other developing countries grow more viable economies by: building on innovative businesses and existing market-based systems equipping NGOs and governments to work with local businesses recognizing that growing out of poverty requires entrepreneurial solutions that drive self-sustainable economic growth Ambitious and optimistic, From Aid to Trade confronts the inadequacies of current foreign aid strategies and offers a clear means of economic and personal growth for individuals seeking a positive future for Haiti and other developing countries."

Barefoot Church

Serving the Least in a Consumer Culture
Author: Brandon Hatmaker
Publisher: Zondervan
ISBN: 0310492270
Category: Religion
Page: 208
View: 5343

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People are hungry to make a difference in their community, yet most don’t know where to start. In fact, “serving the least” is often one of the most neglected biblical mandates in the church. Barefoot Church shows readers how today’s church can be a catalyst for individual, collective, and social renewal in any context. Whether pastors or laypeople, readers will discover practical ideas that end up being as much about the Gospel and personal transformation as they are about serving the poor. Here they will see how the organizational structure of the church can be created or redesigned for mission in any context. Drawing from his own journey, Brandon Hatmaker proves to readers that serving the least is not a trendy act of benevolence but a lifestyle of authentic community and spiritual transformation. As Hatmaker writes, “My hope is that God would open our eyes more and more to the needs of our community. And that we would see it as the church’s responsibility to lead the charge.”

From Dependence to Dignity

How to Alleviate Poverty through Church-Centered Microfinance
Author: Brian Fikkert,Russell Mask
Publisher: Zondervan
ISBN: 031051813X
Category: Religion
Page: 336
View: 7665

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The church of Jesus Christ finds itself at a very unique moment in history. The average Christian living in the “economically advanced countries” enjoys a level of prosperity that has been unimaginable for most of human history. At the same time, over 2.5 billion people in the Majority World (Africa, Asia, and Latin America) live on less than $2 per day, with many of these people being Christians. Ironically, it is amongst the “least of these” in the Global South that the global church is experiencing the most rapid growth. All of this raises profound challenges to the global church. How can churches and missionaries in the Majority World effectively address the devastating poverty both inside their congregations and just outside their doors? How can churches in the economically advanced countries effectively partner with Global South churches in this process? The very integrity of the global church’s testimony is at stake, for where God’s people reside, there should be no poverty (Deuteronomy 15:4; Acts 4:34). For the past several decades, microfinance (MF) and microenterprise development (MED) have been the leading approaches to poverty alleviation. MF/MED is a set of interventions that allow households to better manage their finances and start small businesses. From remote churches in rural Africa to the short-term missions programs of mega-churches in the United States, churches and missionaries have taken the plunge into MF/MED, trying to emulate the apparent success of large-scale relief and development organizations. Unfortunately, most churches and missionaries find this to be far more difficult than they had imagined. Repayment rates on loans are low and churches typically end up with struggling programs that require ongoing financial subsidies. Everybody gets hurt in the process: donors, relief and development agencies, churches and missionaries, and--most importantly—the poor people themselves. This book explains the basic principles for successfully utilizing microfinance in ministry. Drawing on best practice research and their own pioneering work with the Chalmers Center, Brian Fikkert and Russell Mask chart a path for churches and missionaries to pursue, a path that minimizes the risks of harm, relies on local resources, and enables missionaries and churches to minister in powerful ways to the spiritual and economic needs of some of the poorest people on the planet. The insights of microfinance can play a tremendous role in helping to stabilize poor households, removing them from the brink of disaster and enabling them to make the changes that are conducive to long-term progress. Moreover, when combined with evangelism and discipleship, a church-centered microfinance program can be a powerful tool for holistic ministry—one that is empowering for the poor and devoid of the dependencies plaguing most relationships between churches in economically advanced countries and churches in poor nations.