Thought and Faith in the Philosophy of Hegel


Author: J.E. Walker
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9401132267
Category: Philosophy
Page: 197
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The purpose of this collection of papers is to introduce English speaking philosophers and theologians to something of the variety of the contemporary debate about the religious relevance of Hegel's thought. It is published in the hope that it will appeal not only to specialised students of Hegel's Philosophy of Religion but to a wide audience of scholars interested in Hegel's thought as a whole. The volume grew out of the 1987 Oxford conference on Thought and Faith in the Philosophy of Hegel, but has since developed beyond the confines of the original conference programme. The programme of the conference consisted of five major papers on different aspects of Hegel's religious thought and its reception, followed by a somewhat shorter commentary delivered by another scholar in the same field. This basic format has been retained, but a number of the commentaries have been extended or rewritten and an entirely new piece by Kurt Meist has been commissioned for the purpose of this collection. The volume includes studies of the Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion and the Phenomenology, as well as pieces dealing with the theological relevance of Hegel's philosophy of history and Kierkegaard's attack on Hegel. It con cludes with an examination of the relevance of Hegel's doctrine of absolute Spirit to the modern defence of his philosophy as a whole.

Eduard Gans and the Hegelian Philosophy of Law


Author: M.H. Hoffheimer
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9401585237
Category: Philosophy
Page: 142
View: 7814

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Gans ranks at the head of that important group of Hegelian thinkers that bridged the generations of Hegel and Marx. ! Yet there is a large gap between Gans 's historical importance and the scholarship on him. Despite a renewal of interest in Gans's work on the Continent,2 Gans remains almost completely unknown to English-Ianguage scholars, and almost none ofhis work has been 3 previously translated. His Prefaces to his posthumous editions of Hegel's writings are inaccessib1e to English speakers, despite the fact that they shed important light on the authenticity of the so-called Additions to those texts. His Preface to Hegel's Philosophy ofLaw has never been translated before, while his Preface to the Philosophy of History has been omitted from reprintings 4 for generations. Moreover, the recent scholarship on the Continent has focused on Gans 's political and philosophical rather than his legal writings. There is little dis cussion in any language ofhis system oflaw, which is the focus ofthe present study. Some of the reasons for the neglect of Gans are obvious. Gans cannot be a hero for most readers today. He accepted apostasy as a means to profes sional advancement. And though more liberal than Hegel, Gans nonetheless accommodated himself to the results of the Restoration and evaded political persecution that might have kindled the sympathy of later generations.

Hegel's Philosophy of the Historical Religions


Author: Bart Labuschagne,Timo Slootweg
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004226184
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 284
View: 2824

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The chapters in this book offer an in-depth and profound overview of Hegel’s daring, many-faceted philosophical interpretations of the multifarious and dialectically interrelated, historical religions, including the Islam and the ‘revealed’ religion of Christianity (Catholicism and Protestantism).

The Books of Nature and Scripture

Recent Essays on Natural Philosophy, Theology and Biblical Criticism in the Netherlands of Spinoza’s Time and the British Isles of Newton’s Time
Author: J.E. Force,R.H. Popkin
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9401732493
Category: Social Science
Page: 230
View: 9172

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Dick Popkin and James Force have attended a number of recent conferences where it was apparent that much new and important research was being done in the fields of interpreting Newton's and Spinoza's contributions as biblical scholars and of the relationship between their biblical scholarship and other aspects of their particular philosophies. This collection represents the best current research in this area. It stands alone as the only work to bring together the best current work on these topics. Its primary audience is specialised scholars of the thought of Newton and Spinoza as well as historians of the philosophical ideas of the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries.

Treatise on the Human Mind (1666)


Author: Louis de la Forge
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9401735905
Category: Philosophy
Page: 246
View: 4552

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Descartes' philosophy represented one of the most explicit statements of mind-body dualism in the history of philosophy. Its most familiar expression is found in the Meditations (1641) and in Part I of The Principles 0/ Philosophy (1644). However neither of these books provided a detailed discussion of dualism. The Meditations was primarily concerned with finding a foundation for reliable human knowledge, while the Principles attempted to provide an alternative metaphysical framework, in contrast with scholastic philosophy, within which natural philosophy or a scien tific explanation of natural phenomena could be developed. Thus neither book ex plicitly presents a Cartesian theory of the mind nor does either give a detailed account of how, if dualism were accepted, mind and body would interact. The task of articulating such a theory was left to two further works, only one of which was completed by Descartes, viz. the Treatise on Man (published posthumously in 1664). The Treatise began with the following sentence, describing the hypothetical human beings who were to be explained in that work: 'These human beings will be com posed, as we are, of a soul and a body; and, first of all, I must describe the body for you separately; then, also separately, the soul; and fmally I must show you how these two natures would have to be joined and united to constitute human beings resembling us.

Melancholy Duty

The Hume-Gibbon Attack on Christianity
Author: S.P. Foster
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9401722358
Category: Philosophy
Page: 362
View: 577

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This book studies the complementary features of the thought of David Hume and Edward Gibbon in the complete range of its confrontation with eighteenth-century Christianity. The ten chapters explore the iconoclasm of these two philosophical historians - Hume as the premier philosopher, Gibbon as the consummate historian - as they labored to `naturalize' the study of Christianity, particularly with attention to its social and political dimensions. No other work deals as comprehensively or thoroughly with the attempt of philosophical history's challenge to Christianity. Belief in miracles and the afterlife, the dimensions of fanaticism and superstition, and the nature of religious persecution were the themes that occupied Hume and Gibbon in the making of their critique of Christianity. This book makes a valuable contribution to scholarship in a number of fields including the history of ideas, religious studies, and philosophy. It will be of interest to philosophers of religion, historians of ideas, eighteenth-century intellectual historians, scholars of the Scottish Enlightenment, and Hume and Gibbon scholars.

Millenarianism and Messianism in Early Modern European Culture

Volume III: The Millenarian Turn: Millenarian Contexts of Science, Politics and Everyday Anglo-American Life in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries
Author: J.E. Force,R.H. Popkin
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 940172282X
Category: History
Page: 198
View: 316

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The influence of millenarian thinking upon Cromwell's England is well-known. The cultural and intellectual conceptions of the role of millenarian ideas in the `long' 18th century when, so the `official' story goes, the religious sceptics and deists of Enlightened England effectively tarred such religious radicalism as `enthusiasm' has been less well examined. This volume endeavors to revise this `official' story and to trace the influence of millenarian ideas in the science, politics, and everyday life of England and America in the 17th and 18th centuries.

Millenarianism and Messianism in Early Modern European Culture

Volume I: Jewish Messianism in the Early Modern World
Author: M. Goldish,R.H. Popkin
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9401722781
Category: Philosophy
Page: 246
View: 7620

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The earliest scientific studies of Jewish messianism were conducted by the scholars of the Wissenschaft des Judentums school, particularly Heinrich Graetz, the first great Jewish historian of the Jews since Josephus. These researches were invaluable because they utilized primary sources in print and manuscript which had been previously unknown or used only in polemics. The Wissenschaft studies themselves, however, prove to be polemics as well on closer inspection. Among the goals of this group was to demonstrate that Judaism is a rational and logical faith whose legitimacy and historical progress deserve recognition by the nations of Europe. Mystical and messianic beliefs which might undermine this image were presented as aberrations or the result of corrosive foreign influences on the Jews. Gershom Scholem took upon himself the task of returning mysticism and messianism to their rightful central place in the panorama of Jewish thought. Jewish messianism was, for Scholem, a central theme in the philosophy and life of the Jews throughout their history, shaped anew by each generation to fit its specific hopes and needs. Scholem emphasized that this phenomenon was essentially independent of messianic or millenarian trends among other peoples. For example, in discussing messianism in the early modern era Scholem describes a trunk of influence on the Jewish psyche set off by the expulsion from Spain in 1492.

Elements, Principles and Corpuscles

A Study of Atomism and Chemistry in the Seventeenth Century
Author: Antonio Clericuzio
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9401594643
Category: Science
Page: 232
View: 5052

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In Elements, Principles and Particles, Antonio Clericuzio explores the relationships between chemistry and corpuscular philosophy in the age of the Scientific Revolution. Science historians have regarded chemistry and corpuscular philosophy as two distinct traditions. Clericuzio's view is that since the beginning of the 17th century atomism and chemistry were strictly connected. This is attested by Daniel Sennert and by many hitherto little-known French and English natural philosophers. They often combined a corpuscular theory of matter with Paracelsian chemical (and medical) doctrines. Boyle plays a central part in the present book: Clericuzio redefines Boyle's chemical views, by showing that Boyle did not subordinate chemistry to the principles of mechanical philosophy. When Boyle explained chemical phenomena, he had recourse to corpuscles endowed with chemical, not mechanical, properties. The combination of chemistry and corpuscular philosophy was adopted by a number of chemists active in the last decades of the 17th century, both in England and on the Continent. Using a large number of primary sources, the author challenges the standard view of the corpuscular theory of matter as identical with the mechanical philosophy. He points out that different versions of the corpuscular philosophy flourished in the 17th century. Most of them were not based on the mechanical theory, i.e. on the view that matter is inert and has only mechanical properties. Throughout the 17th century, active principles, as well as chemical properties, are attributed to corpuscles. Given its broad coverage, the book is a significant contribution to both history of science and history of philosophy.

Cartesian Spacetime

Descartes’ Physics and the Relational Theory of Space and Motion
Author: E. Slowik
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9401709750
Category: Philosophy
Page: 252
View: 7256

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Although Descartes' natural philosophy marked an advance in the development of modern science, many critics over the years, such as Newton, have rejected his particular `relational' theory of space and motion. Nevertheless, it is also true that most historians and philosophers have not sufficiently investigated the viability of the Cartesian theory. This book explores, consequently, the success of the arguments against Descartes' theory of space and motion by determining if it is possible to formulate a version that can eliminate its alleged problems. In essence, this book comprises the first sustained attempt to construct a consistent `Cartesian' spacetime theory: that is, a theory of space and time that consistently incorporates Descartes' various physical and metaphysical concepts. Intended for students in the history of philosophy and science, this study reveals the sophisticated insights, and often quite successful elements, in Descartes' unjustly neglected relational theory of space and motion.

Philosophy, Theology, and Hegel's Berlin Philosophy of Religion, 1821-1827


Author: Philip M. Merklinger
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 9780791414910
Category: Religion
Page: 250
View: 6657

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This book examines Hegel's contribution to the debate about the relationship between philosophy and theology, reason and faith. The author locates the debate within the philosophy of religion, displaying that there is a need for philosophy to enter into dialogue with, and to reflect upon, the contents of theology. Utilizing the recently published critical editions of Hegel's Berlin Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion, the author substantiates this insight by tracing dialectically the development of Hegel's notion of the philosophy of religion through the 1821, 1824, and 1827 lecture-series on religion. Not only does the author demonstrate that philosophy needs to incorporate theology in its thinking, but he also establishes that such incorporation means that the philosophy of religion will be a continuously developing mode of reflection. Indeed, the author notes this developing philosophy of religion can, for Hegel, only take place through dialectical interaction with the leading theologies and theologians of one's time. The book shows that this inner development of the philosophy of religion is also the inner development of the Spirit itself.

G.W.F Hegel

Theologian Of The Spirit
Author: Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel,Peter Crafts Hodgson
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 9780567085528
Category: Religion
Page: 306
View: 8651

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Offering the only anthology of Hegel's religious thought, Vanderbilt University's Professor Peter C. Hodgson provides sympathetic and clear entree to the German philosopher's religious achievement through his major relevant texts starting with early theological writings and culminating with Hegel's1824 lectures on the philosophy of religion.

Hegel

Hovering Over the Corpse of Faith and Reason
Author: Kipton E. Jensen
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: 1443838500
Category: Philosophy
Page: 198
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This manuscript provides a revisionist reading of Hegel’s 1802 essay, Faith and Knowledge, in which he critiques the various reconciliations of faith and reason proposed by his immediate predecessors and contemporary faith philosophers – namely, Kant, Jacobi, Schleiermacher and Fichte. Hegel’s agonistic interpretation of these “reflective philosophers of subjectivity,” who he reads as settling for a form of reason that is “no longer worthy of the name” and a version of faith that “no longer seems worth the bother,” not only demonstrates his growing facility with the dialectical method for which he is best known but it also anticipates his own speculative reconciliation of faith and reason. To view Hegel’s reading of his predecessors as a series of misreadings, which is not uncommon among scholars of 19th century German philosophy, misses the most instructive aspect of this early but formative essay: Hegel, who was viewed by others if not also by himself as a philosophical latecomer, appropriated the thought of his precursors with an eye toward overcoming them.

Lectures on the Philosophy of Religion


Author: Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520060203
Category: Religion
Page: 552
View: 9089

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"In this definitive English edition we now at last possess an adequate tool for scholarly work on Hegel's philosophy of religion. The translation, accurate and yet readable, is bound to last more than a lifetime. The introductions provide us with up-to-date information on scholarship and with the best available guide to Hegel's own thought. This edition clearly constitutes the most significant achievement in Hegel scholarship in America in years."--Louis Dupré, Yale University

Hegel's Philosophy of Reality, Freedom, and God


Author: Robert M. Wallace
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521844840
Category: Philosophy
Page: 346
View: 1480

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Showing the relevance of Hegel's arguments, this 2005 book discusses both original texts and their interpretations.

Hegel: Faith and Knowledge

An English translation of G. W. F. Hegel's Glauben und Wissen
Author: G.W.F. Hegel
Publisher: SUNY Press
ISBN: 9780887068263
Category: Philosophy
Page: 206
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As the title indicates, Faith and Knowledge deals with the relation between religious faith and cognitive beliefs, between the truth of religion and the truths of philosophy and science. Hegel is guided by his understanding of the historical situation: the individual alienated from God, nature, and community; and he is influenced by the new philosophy of Schelling, the Spinozistic Philosophy of Identity with its superb vision of the inner unity of God, nature, and rational man. Through a brilliant discussion of the philosophies of Kant, Fichte, and other luminaries of the period, Hegel shows that the time has finally come to give philosophy the authentic shape it has always been trying to reach, a shape in which philosophy’s old conflicts with religion on the one hand and with the sciences on the other are suspended once for all. This is the first English translation of this important essay. Professor H. S. Harris offers a historical and analytic commentary to the text and Professor Cerf offers an introduction to the general reader which focuses on the concept of intellectual intuition and on the difference between authentic and inauthentic philosophy.

Kierkegaard and the Crisis of Faith

An Introduction to His Thought
Author: George Pattison
Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 1625645023
Category: Religion
Page: 160
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The standing of the Danish philosopher and religious thinker S¿ren Kierkegaard has gone up in recent years. Yet because he regarded communication as being as much about self-concealment as about self-revelation, he can still seem a forbidding and difficult figure. The deliberate ambiguity of Kierkegaard, in which he set out to repel as much as to attract his readers, is here explored by George Pattison, who gives full attention to the scandalous element of the philosopher's work, and does not shy away from his ambivalent attitudes towards sexuality, the body, marriage, and the family. This book is unlike other nontechnical introductions to Kierkegaard in that it does not seek to promote one part of Kierkegaard's writings over others, but offers, rather, a perspective on his life and output as a whole. That Kierkegaard grappled in his own age with many of the problems which beset our own, and frequently offered fascinating responses to those problems, is a major incentive to examine his thought today. By placing Kierkegaard in the context of a "crisis of faith"and making valuable connections between events in the philosopher's life and the development of his thinking, the author of this timely, readable, and attractively written study has produced a book which should be of interest to a wide nonspecialist readership.

Timeless Truth in the Hands of History

A Short History of System in Theology
Author: Gale Heide
Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 1630877980
Category: Religion
Page: 230
View: 8534

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What is the purpose of theology for the church? Systematic theology provides an inroad into this question by offering both a method for doing theology and an explanation for the purpose of that method. However, system is itself the product of a specific understanding of knowledge grounded in rational demonstration of facts. This study attempts to address the historical debate over when systematic theology began. Much of the debate is centered on the definition of system and revolves around the use, or lack thereof, of external philosophical categories or language. Specific historical figures have been selected to serve as illustrations of how theological prolegomena functioned in works prior to and following the influence of Enlightenment thought. In the early chapters it will be seen that theology was neither totally saturated with, nor totally devoid of, external philosophical reference points or programmatic intentions. On the contrary, both external points of reference and programmatic intentions have played a role in theology since the church's inception. In other words, certain elements of system (e.g., logic, non-contradiction, organization) have played a role in theological investigation and construction since, at least, the second century. The last two chapters of this study demonstrate that these may not be the same influences that have marked post-Enlightenment systematics. One of the primary characteristics of pre-Enlightenment theology is its intentional focus on the life of the church. Theology, like the Scriptures, was often written for specific circumstances. Enlightenment influences significantly changed the intentions of much of theology in that theological knowledge was studied and displayed for the sake of knowledge itself. The church no longer mattered, or was at best an afterthought, in the realm of what is now seen as the domain of academic theology.

Dialogues between Faith and Reason

The Death and Return of God in Modern German Thought
Author: John H. Smith
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801463289
Category: Religion
Page: 328
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The contemporary theologian Hans Küng has asked if the "death of God," proclaimed by Nietzsche as the event of modernity, was inevitable. Did the empowering of new forms of rationality in Western culture beginning around 1500 lead necessarily to the reduction or privatization of faith? In Dialogues between Faith and Reason, John H. Smith traces a major line in the history of theology and the philosophy of religion down the "slippery slope" of secularization-from Luther and Erasmus, through Idealism, to Nietzsche, Heidegger, and contemporary theory such as that of Derrida, Habermas, Vattimo, and Asad. At the same time, Smith points to the persistence of a tradition that grew out of the Reformation and continues in the mostly Protestant philosophical reflection on whether and how faith can be justified by reason. In this accessible and vigorously argued book, Smith posits that faith and reason have long been locked in mutual engagement in which they productively challenge each other as partners in an ongoing "dialogue." Smith is struck by the fact that although in the secularized West the death of God is said to be fundamental to the modern condition, our current post-modernity is often characterized as a "postsecular" time. For Smith, this means not only that we are experiencing a broad-based "return of religion" but also, and more important for his argument, that we are now able to recognize the role of religion within the history of modernity. Emphasizing that, thanks to the logos located "in the beginning," the death of God is part of the inner logic of the Christian tradition, he argues that this same strand of reasoning also ensures that God will always "return" (often in new forms). In Smith's view, rational reflection on God has both undermined and justified faith, while faith has rejected and relied on rational argument. Neither a defense of atheism nor a call to belief, his book explores the long history of their interaction in modern religious and philosophical thought.