Naval Documents of the American Revolution Volume 12, American Theater, April 1, 1778-May 31, 1778; European Theater, April 1, 1778- May 31, 1778


Author: Naval History & Heritage Command (U.S.)
Publisher: Government Printing Office
ISBN: 9780945274728
Category: History
Page: 1029
View: 5270

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With a foreword by President Barack Obama, the twelfth volume in the Naval History and Heritage Command’s Naval Documents of the American Revolution series tells the story of the Revolutionary War on the water during the period of April to June 1778. In the tradition of the preceding volumes—the first of which was published in 1964—this work synthesizes edited documents, including correspondence, ship logs, muster rolls, orders, and newspaper accounts, that provide a comprehensive understanding of the war at sea in the spring of 1778. The editors organize this wide array of texts chronologically by theater and incorporate French, Italian, and Spanish transcriptions with English translations throughout. Volume 12 presents the essential primary sources on a crucial time in the young republic’s naval history—as the British consolidate their strength in the Mid-Atlantic, and the Americans threaten British shipping in European waters and gain a powerful ally as France prepares to enter the war.

Theaters of the American Revolution


Author: James Kirby Martin,Mark Edward Lender,Edward G. Lengel,Jim Piecuch
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781594162756
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 2214

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The American Revolution in Monmouth County

The Theatre of Spoil and Destruction
Author: Michael S. Adelberg
Publisher: History Press (SC)
ISBN: 9781609490010
Category: History
Page: 157
View: 9673

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Like much of New Jersey during the American Revolution, Monmouth County was contested territory in between the great armies. As the Battles of Trenton, Princeton and Bound Brook raged nearby, the people of Monmouth County fought their own internal revolution; Loyalist partisans led insurrections and raids that laid waste to entire neighborhoods. In 1778, General George Washington rallied his Continental army and fought the British within Monmouth's borders, barely holding the field. Monmouth Countians joined the fight and then spent the following weeks caring for the wounded and burying the dead. The remaining war years brought more hardships, as they grappled with a local civil war charged with racial, religious and economic undercurrents--a local civil war that continued long after the Battle of Yorktown supposedly ended hostilities. Revolutionary War scholar Michael S. Adelberg brings to life the struggles within Monmouth County, a place that New Jersey governor William Livingston called "the theatre of spoil and destruction."

Chronology of the American Revolution

Military and Political Actions Day by Day
Author: Bud Hannings
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 1476608377
Category: History
Page: 552
View: 2515

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From the Battle of Lexington and Concord on 19 April, 1775, up through the reduction of the victorious Continental Army to a single regiment in January 1784, this book is a day-to-day chronicle of the American Revolution, both on the battlefield and in the halls of the Continental Congress. Covered in detail are the movements of not only the Continental Army and Navy, but the Marines—not covered comprehensively in other sources—and the militia. Information on the actions of Congress highlights each day’s business, including the resolutions pertinent to the war. Drawing on such vital primary documents as the Journals of the Continental Congress and the Diplomatic Correspondence of the American Revolution, the book offers a close-up view of the political and military tension of the time, the perilous situation of the colonists, and the concerns of the soldiers and sailors immersed in battle. It also provides insight into the moves and counter-moves of British and American forces as intelligence flowed in both directions to influence the course of combat. All military campaigns of the revolution, from Canada to Florida and Louisiana, are included. The result is unmatched coverage of the battles, both military and legislative, that gave birth to America.

The Oxford Handbook of American Drama


Author: Jeffrey H. Richards,Heather S. Nathans
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199731497
Category: Drama
Page: 568
View: 4258

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This volume explores the history of American drama from the eighteenth to the twentieth century. It describes origins of early republican drama and its evolution during the pre-war and post-war periods. It traces the emergence of different types of American drama including protest plays, reform drama, political drama, experimental drama, urban plays, feminist drama and realist plays. This volume also analyzes the works of some of the most notable American playwrights including Eugene O'Neill, Tennessee Williams, and Arthur Miller and those written by women dramatists.

The American Revolution 100

The People, Battles, and Events of the American War for Independence, Ranked by Their Significance
Author: Michael Lee Lanning
Publisher: Sourcebooks, Inc.
ISBN: 1402210833
Category: History
Page: 373
View: 4655

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Furnishes a ranking of the one hundred most important battles, events, people, military heroes, and political leaders that played a role in the American Revolution.

The History of World Theater

From the English Restoration to the Present
Author: Felicia Hardison Londré,Margot Berthold
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 9780826411679
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 644
View: 5610

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Felicia Londre explores the world of theater as diverse as the Entertainments of the Stuart court and Arthur Miller directing Chinese actors at the Beijing People's Art Theater in "Death of a Salesman." Londre examines: Restoration comedies; the Comedie Francais; Italian "opera seria"; plays of the "Surm und Grand" movement; Russian, French, and Spanish Romantic dramas; American minstrel shows; Brecht and dialectical theater; Dighilev; Dada; Expressionism, Theater of the Absurd productions, and other forms of experimental theater of the late-20th century.>

The American Revolution Reader's Theater Script and Lesson


Author: Melissa A. Settle
Publisher: Teacher Created Materials
ISBN: 1480767514
Category:
Page: 8
View: 727

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Improve reading fluency while providing fun and purposeful practice for performance. Motivate students with this reader's theater script and build students' knowledge through grade-level content. Included graphic organizer helps visual learners.

The Virginia Landmarks Register


Author: Calder Loth,Virginia. Dept. of Historic Resources
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
ISBN: 9780813918624
Category: Architecture
Page: 601
View: 6387

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The fourth edition of The Virginia Landmarks Register is an entirely new, fully illustrated compilation of the state's buildings, structures, sites, and districts that have been officially designated as historic landmarks by the Virginia Board of Historic Resources over the past thirty years. The assemblage of nearly 1,800 entries—700 more than in the third edition, published in 1986—represents the most comprehensive inventory of Virginia's rich and varied historic patrimony ever published. An invaluable reference for any Virginian, scholar, planner, architect, or preservationist, the Register is far more than an official list of names. Every registered landmark and district is identified by a brief history documenting its significance and by a brief description. Each entry is accompanied by a photograph showing its current appearance. Arranged alphabetically by county and independent city, the entries include not only many nationally famous places but the entire spectrum of the Commonwealth's cultural resources, from a 1,200-year-old prehistoric archaeological site through twentieth-century commercial architecture, from gristmills and metal-truss bridges and iron furnaces to NASA space exploration installations. Those interested in traditional Virginia architecture will discover a multiplicity of building types, both high-style and vernacular. Included, too, are important landmarks of black history, the Civil War, education, and industry. The Virginia Landmarks Register, fourth edition, will create for the reader a deeper awareness of a unique legacy and will serve to enhance the stewardship of Virginia's irreplaceable heritage.

The Concept of Liberty in the Age of the American Revolution


Author: John Phillip Reid
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226708966
Category: Political Science
Page: 224
View: 6534

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"Liberty was the most cherished right possessed by English-speaking people in the eighteenth century. It was both an ideal for the guidance of governors and a standard with which to measure the constitutionality of government; both a cause of the American Revolution and a purpose for drafting the United States Constitution; both an inheritance from Great Britain and a reason republican common lawyers continued to study the law of England." As John Philip Reid goes on to make clear, "liberty" did not mean to the eighteenth-century mind what it means today. In the twentieth century, we take for granted certain rights—such as freedom of speech and freedom of the press—with which the state is forbidden to interfere. To the revolutionary generation, liberty was preserved by curbing its excesses. The concept of liberty taught not what the individual was free to do but what the rule of law permitted. Ultimately, liberty was law—the rule of law and the legalism of custom. The British constitution was the charter of liberty because it provided for the rule of law. Drawing on an impressive command of the original materials, Reid traces the eighteenth-century notion of liberty to its source in the English common law. He goes on to show how previously problematic arguments involving the related concepts of licentiousness, slavery, arbitrary power, and property can also be fit into the common-law tradition. Throughout, he focuses on what liberty meant to the people who commented on and attempted to influence public affairs on both sides of the Atlantic. He shows the depth of pride in liberty—English liberty—that pervaded the age, and he also shows the extent—unmatched in any other era or among any other people—to which liberty both guided and motivated political and constitutional action.

The Early Republic and Rise of National Identity

1783-1861
Author: Jeffrey H. Hacker
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317457374
Category: History
Page: 224
View: 2437

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The Early Republic and the Rise of National Identity, a new title in the six-title series History Through Literature: American Voices, American Themes, provides insights and analysis regarding the history, literature, and cultural climate of the formative period of the Early Republic through the early 1860s. It brings together informational text and primary documents that cover notable historic events and trends, authors, literary works, social movements, and cultural and artistic themes. The Early Republic and the Rise of National Identity begins with an interdisciplinary Chronology that identifies, defines, and places in context the notable historical events, literary works, authors' lives, and cultural landmarks of the period. This is followed by a comprehensive overview essay that summarizes the era's major historical trends, social movements, cultural and artistic themes, literary voices, and enduring works as reflections of each other and the spirit of the times. The core content comprises 20-30 articles on representative writers of the period, along with excerpts from essential literary works that highlight a historical theme, sociocultural movement, or the confluence of the two. These excerpts serve the Common Core emphasis on "informational texts from a broad range of cultures and periods", including "stories, drama, poetry, and literary nonfiction".

McKee Rankin and the Heyday of the American Theater


Author: David R. Beasley
Publisher: David Beasley
ISBN: 0889203903
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 520
View: 687

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Annotation A retired research librarian chronicles the mercurial career of Canadian-born Rankin (1844-1914), an innovator of the early US theater. Rankin was a leading actor, playwright, and creator of a school of acting in New York and a notable repertory theater in San Francisco. Period photographs show Rankin in his heyday, as well as other actorse.g., the Barrymoreswith whom he was associated. Appendices list his progeny and plays. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com).

Rewriting White

Race, Class, and Cultural Capital in Nineteenth-Century America
Author: Todd Vogel
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 0813558352
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 208
View: 6084

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What did it mean for people of color in nineteenth-century America to speak or write “white”? More specifically, how many and what kinds of meaning could such “white” writing carry? In ReWriting White, Todd Vogel looks at how America has racialized language and aesthetic achievement. To make his point, he showcases the surprisingly complex interactions between four nineteenth-century writers of color and the “standard white English” they adapted for their own moral, political, and social ends. The African American, Native American, and Chinese American writers Vogel discusses delivered their messages in a manner that simultaneously demonstrated their command of the dominant discourse of their times—using styles and addressing forums considered above their station—and fashioned a subversive meaning in the very act of that demonstration. The close readings and meticulous archival research in ReWriting White upend our conventional expectations, enrich our understanding of the dynamics of hegemony and cultural struggle, and contribute to the efforts of other cutting-edge contemporary scholars to chip away at the walls of racial segregation that have for too long defined and defaced the landscape of American literary and cultural studies.

Between Sovereignty and Anarchy

The Politics of Violence in the American Revolutionary Era
Author: Patrick Griffin,Robert G. Ingram,Peter S. Onuf,Brian Schoen
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
ISBN: 0813936799
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 3706

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Between Sovereignty and Anarchy considers the conceptual and political problem of violence in the early modern Anglo-Atlantic, charting an innovative approach to the history of the American Revolution. Its editors and contributors contend that existing scholarship on the Revolution largely ignores questions of power and downplays the Revolution as a contest over sovereignty. Contributors employ a variety of methodologies to examine diverse themes, ranging from how Atlantic perspectives can redefine our understanding of revolutionary origins, to the ways in which political culture, mobilization, and civil-war-like violence were part of the revolutionary process, to the fundamental importance of state formation for the history of the early republic. The editors skillfully meld these emerging currents to produce a new perspective on the American Revolution, revealing how America—first as colonies, then as united states—reeled between poles of anarchy and sovereignty. This interpretation—gleaned from essays on frontier bloodshed, religion, civility, slavery, loyalism, mobilization, early national political culture, and war making—provides a needed stimulus to a field that has not strayed beyond the bounds of "rhetoric versus reality" for more than a generation. Between Sovereignty and Anarchy raises foundational questions about how we are to view the American Revolution and the experimental democracy that emerged in its wake. Contributors: Chris Beneke, Bentley University · Andrew Cayton, Miami University · Matthew Rainbow Hale, Goucher College · David C. Hendrickson, Colorado College · John C. Kotruch, University of New Hampshire · Peter C. Messer, Mississippi State University · Kenneth Owen, University of Illinois at Springfield · Jeffrey L. Pasley, University of Missouri, Columbia · Jessica Choppin Roney, Temple University · Peter Thompson, University of Oxford

From Savannah to Yorktown

The American Revolution in the South
Author: Henry Lumpkin
Publisher: iUniverse
ISBN: 0595000975
Category: History
Page: 352
View: 3814

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Bloodshed in the American Revolution began in Massachusetts and ended in South Carolina. That the last major action of the war occurred in the South was no accident. The British regarded the South as their best chance of crushing the rebellion, and a southern strategy governed British military campaigning during the decisive years from 1778 to 1781. How that strategy failed in Georgia, the Carolinas, and Virginia is answered in this highly readable military history, which carries the reader from the early backcountry skirmishes to the climactic triumph at Yorktown. From Savannah to Yorktown sketches many of the colorful field commanders, discusses the weaponry and uniforms, and, above all, unfolds the battle events, strategy, and tactics. Well-illustrated with maps, portraits, battle scenes, and arms, this first comprehensive military history devoted to the American Revolution in the South will be welcomed by anyone interested in the southern battleground of freedom.

Listening and Longing

Music Lovers in the Age of Barnum
Author: Daniel Cavicchi
Publisher: Wesleyan University Press
ISBN: 0819571636
Category: Music
Page: 280
View: 8201

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Winner of the Northeast Popular Culture Association’s Peter C. Rollins Book Award (2012) Winner of the ASCAP Deems Taylor Award (2012) Listening and Longing explores the emergence of music listening in the United States, from its early stages in the antebellum era, when entrepreneurs first packaged and sold the experience of hearing musical performance, to the Gilded Age, when genteel critics began to successfully redefine the cultural value of listening to music. In a series of interconnected stories, American studies scholar Daniel Cavicchi focuses on the impact of industrialization, urbanization, and commercialization in shaping practices of music audiences in America. Grounding our contemporary culture of listening in its seminal historical moment—before the iPod, stereo system, or phonograph—Cavicchi offers a fresh understanding of the role of listening in the history of music.

The Oxford Handbook of the American Revolution


Author: Edward G. Gray,Jane Kamensky
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199746702
Category: History
Page: 673
View: 2281

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The Oxford Handbook of the American Revolution introduces scholars, students and generally interested readers to the formative event in American history. In thirty-three individual essays, the Handbook provides readers with in-depth analysis of the Revolution's many sides.

The Elusive Prominence of Maxwell Anderson in the American Theater


Author: Russell Dinapoli
Publisher: Universitat de València
ISBN: 8437085330
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 200
View: 9536

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Instructivo, ameno y documentado de manera soberbia, este libro constituye el primer estudio relevante sobre Maxwell Anderson publicado en España. El trabajo de DiNapoli ofrece una excelente introducción a este interesante aunque controvertido dramaturgo