The Way of Herodotus

Travels with the Man Who Invented History
Author: Justin Marozzi
Publisher: Da Capo Press
ISBN: 0786727276
Category: History
Page: 384
View: 1562

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Intrepid travel historian Justin Marozzi retraces the footsteps of Herodotus through the Mediterranean and Middle East, examining Herodotus's 2,500-year-old observations about the cultures and places he visited and finding echoes of his legacy reverberating to this day. The Way of Herodotus is a lively yet thought-provoking excursion into the world of Herodotus, with the man who invented history ever present, guiding the narrative with his discursive spirit.

The Way of Herodotus

Travels with the Man who Invented History
Author: Justin Marozzi
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 0306816210
Category: History
Page: 348
View: 5999

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Journeying back 2,500 years, the story of the first history text written by Herodotus is reviewed through an examination of his in-depth chronicles, tales of the people he met, and detailed descriptions of the lands he visited in the Mediterranean and Middle East.

The Way of Herodotus

Travels with the Man Who Invented History
Author: Justin Marozzi
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 0786727276
Category: History
Page: 384
View: 7952

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Intrepid travel historian Justin Marozzi retraces the footsteps of Herodotus through the Mediterranean and Middle East, examining Herodotus's 2,500-year-old observations about the cultures and places he visited and finding echoes of his legacy reverberating to this day. The Way of Herodotus is a lively yet thought-provoking excursion into the world of Herodotus, with the man who invented history ever present, guiding the narrative with his discursive spirit.

Travels with Herodotus


Author: Ryszard Kapuscinski
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307548236
Category: History
Page: 288
View: 5871

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From the renowned journalist comes this intimate account of his years in the field, traveling for the first time beyond the Iron Curtain to India, China, Ethiopia, and other exotic locales. In the 1950s, Ryszard Kapuscinski finished university in Poland and became a foreign correspondent, hoping to go abroad – perhaps to Czechoslovakia. Instead, he was sent to India – the first stop on a decades-long tour of the world that took Kapuscinski from Iran to El Salvador, from Angola to Armenia. Revisiting his memories of traveling the globe with a copy of Herodotus' Histories in tow, Kapuscinski describes his awakening to the intricacies and idiosyncrasies of new environments, and how the words of the Greek historiographer helped shape his own view of an increasingly globalized world. Written with supreme eloquence and a constant eye to the global undercurrents that have shaped the last half-century, Travels with Herodotus is an exceptional chronicle of one man's journey across continents. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Herodotus

And The Road to History
Author: Jeanne Bendick
Publisher: Bethlehem Books
ISBN: 1932350209
Category: Juvenile Fiction
Page: 78
View: 2592

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Best-selling author Jeanne Bendick takes us for another informative—and amusing—journey into places and events of long ago. Herodotus and the Road to History, written in the first person, details the investigative journeys of Herodotus—a contemporary of the Old Testament prophet Malachi—as he takes ship from Greece and voyages to the limits of his own ancient world. His persistence, amidst disbelief and ridicule, in the self-appointed task of recording his discoveries as “histories” (the Greek word meaning “inquiry”), means that today we can still follow his expeditions into the wonder and mystery of Syria, Persia, Egypt and the “barbaric” north. Jeanne Bendick's lucid text, humorous illustrations and helpful maps entertain and instruct as they open the way for readers young and old to once again join Herodotus . . . on the road to history.

The History of Herodotus

A New English Version, Ed. with Copious Notes and Appendices, Illustrating the History and Geography of Herodotus, from the Most Recent Sources of Information; and Embodying the Chief Results, Historical and Ethnographical, which Have Been Obtained in the Progress of Cuneiform and Hieroglyphical Discovery
Author: Hérodote
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Greece
Page: N.A
View: 7798

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The Mirror of Herodotus

The Representation of the Other in the Writing of History
Author: François Hartog
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520264231
Category: History
Page: 411
View: 2039

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"The best book to come out on Herodotus in years."—G. E. R. Lloyd, King's College Cambridge

A Guide to Reading Herodotus' Histories


Author: Sean Sheehan
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1474292682
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 336
View: 3192

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Modern scholarship judges Herodotus to be a more complex writer than his past readers supposed. His Histories is now being read in ways that are seemingly incompatible if not contradictory. This volume interrogates the various ways the text of the Histories has been and can be read by scholars: as the seminal text of our Ur-historian, as ethnology, literary art and fable. Our readings can bring out various guises of Herodotus himself: an author with the eye of a travel writer and the mind of an investigative journalist; a globalist, enlightened but superstitious; a rambling storyteller but a prose stylist; the so-called 'father of history' but in antiquity also labelled the 'father of lies'; both geographer and gossipmonger; both entertainer and an author whom social and cultural historians read and admire. Guiding students chapter-by-chapter through approaches as fascinating and often surprising as the original itself, Sean Sheehan goes beyond conventional Herodotus introductions and instead looks at the various interpretations of the work, which themselves shed light on the original. With text boxes highlighting key topics and indices of passages, this volume is an essential guide for students whether reading Herodotus for the first time, or returning to revisit this crucial text for later research.

The Malice of Herodotus


Author: Plutarch,Anthony Bowen
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780856685699
Category: History
Page: 153
View: 8574

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The Malice of Herodotus can perhaps best be described as the world's earliest known book review. But it is much more than that, for in the course of 'correcting' with considerable vituperation what he saw as Herodotus' anti-Greek bias, Plutarch tells us much about his own attitude to writing history. So that together with Lucian's How to Write History (see Lucian A Selection in this series) it forms a basic text for the study of Greek historiography. It is also perhaps the most revealing example of Plutarch's prose style with its rhetorical variety and energy and odd mixture of good and bad argument. But in citing lost works, Plutarch has preserved valuable fragments which don't exist elsewhere and need to be assessed by all students of the Persian Wars. Greek text with translion, introduction and commentary.

A History of Histories


Author: John Burrow
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307268527
Category: History
Page: 512
View: 9032

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Treating the practice of history not as an isolated pursuit but as an aspect of human society and an essential part of the culture of the West, John Burrow magnificently brings to life and explains the distinctive qualities found in the work of historians from the ancient Egyptians and Greeks to the present. With a light step and graceful narrative, he gathers together over 2,500 years of the moments and decisions that have helped create Western identity. This unique approach is an incredible lens with which to view the past. Standing alone in its ambition, scale and fascination, Burrow's history of history is certain to stand the test of time.

Herodotus Reader

Annotated Passages from Books I-IX of the Histories
Author: Herodotus,Blaise Nagy
Publisher: Focus Pub R Pullins & Company
ISBN: 9781585103041
Category: Foreign Language Study
Page: 238
View: 8681

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An annotated Herodotus reader containing passages from books I-IX of the Histories with introductory material for all nine books of the Histories, commentary and grammatical notes. This book is a standard text for any college course in reading Herodotus in Greek. It is also suitable for post-intermediate, secondary school students who want to tackle the works of a popular but challenging author.

Brill's Companion to Herodotus


Author: Egbert J. Bakker,Irene J.F. de Jong,Hans van Wees
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004217584
Category: History
Page: 672
View: 1832

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Herodotus’ outstanding achievements as a literary figure, intellectual, historian and ethnographer have in recent years come to be appreciated with much greater depth and subtlety. This Companion offers an up-to-date and in-depth overview of current approaches to Herodotus’ remarkable work.

The Madness of Cambyses


Author: Herodotus
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141398787
Category: History
Page: 64
View: 8278

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'Do you see your son, standing over there, in the antechamber? Well, I am going to shoot him.' The story of the great and mad Cambyses, King of Persia, told by part-historian, part-mythmaker Herodotus of Halicarnassus. Introducing Little Black Classics: 80 books for Penguin's 80th birthday. Little Black Classics celebrate the huge range and diversity of Penguin Classics, with books from around the world and across many centuries. They take us from a balloon ride over Victorian London to a garden of blossom in Japan, from Tierra del Fuego to 16th-century California and the Russian steppe. Here are stories lyrical and savage; poems epic and intimate; essays satirical and inspirational; and ideas that have shaped the lives of millions. Herodotus (c.484-425 BCE). Herodotus's The Histories is also available in Penguin Classics.

The Historical Method of Herodotus


Author: Donald Lateiner
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 9780802057938
Category: History
Page: 319
View: 6137

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Herodotus was the first writer in the West to conceive the value of creating a record of the recent past. He found a way to co-ordinate the often conflicting data of history, ethnology, and culture. The Historical Method of Herodotus explores the intellectual habits and the literary principles of this pioneer writer of prose. Donald Lateiner argues, against the perception that Herodotus' work seems amorphous and ill organized, that the Histories contain their own definition of historical significance. He examines patterns of presentation and literary structure in narratives, speeches, and direct communications to the reader, in short, the conventions and rhetoric of history as Herodotus created it. This rhetoric includes the use of recurring themes, the relation of speech to reported actions, indications of doubt, stylistic idiosyncrasies, frequent reference to nonverbal behaviours, and strategies of opening and ending. Lateiner shows how Herodotus sometimes suppresses information on principle and sometimes compels the reader to choose among contending versions of events. His inventories of Herodotus' methods allow the reader to focus on typical practice, not misleading exception. In his analysis of the structuring concepts of the Histories, Lateiner scrutinizes Herodotean time and chronology. He considers the historian's admiration for ethnic freedom and autonomy, the rule of law, and the positive values of conflict. Despite these apparent biases, he argues, the text's intellectual and moral preferences present a generally cool and detached account from which an authorial personality rarely emerges. The Historical Method of Herodotus illuminates the idiosyncrasies and ambitious nature of a major text in classics and the Western tradition and touches on aspects of historiography, ancient history, rhetoric, and the history of ideas.

Herodotus


Author: James S. Romm
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300072303
Category: History
Page: 212
View: 811

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This study argues that Herodotus was both a historian and a master storyteller. Romm discusses the historical background of Herodotus' life and work, his moralistic approach to history, his fascination with people and places, his literary powers, and the question of historical truth.

The History


Author: Herodotus
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226327754
Category: History
Page: 710
View: 7849

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David Grene, one of the best known translators of the Greek classics, splendidly captures the peculiar quality of Herodotus, the father of history. Here is the historian, investigating and judging what he has seen, heard, and read, and seeking out the true causes and consequences of the great deeds of the past. In his History, the war between the Greeks and Persians, the origins of their enmity, and all the more general features of the civilizations of the world of his day are seen as a unity and expressed as the vision of one man who as a child lived through the last of the great acts in this universal drama. In Grene's remarkable translation and commentary, we see the historian as a storyteller, combining through his own narration the skeletal "historical" facts and the imaginative reality toward which his story reaches. Herodotus emerges in all his charm and complexity as a writer and the first historian in the Western tradition, perhaps unique in the way he has seen the interrelation of fact and fantasy. "Reading Herodotus in English has never been so much fun. . . . Herodotus crowds his fresco-like pages with all shades of humanity. Whether Herodotus's view is 'tragic,' mythical, or merely common sense, it provided him with a moral salt with which the diversity of mankind could be savored. And savor it we do in David Grene's translation."—Thomas D'Evelyn, Christian Science Monitor "Grene's work is a monument to what translation intends, and to what it is hungry to accomplish. . . . Herodotus gives more sheer pleasure than almost any other writer."—Peter Levi, New York Times Book Review

Histories


Author: Herodotus,George Rawlinson
Publisher: Wordsworth Editions
ISBN: 9781853264665
Category: Fiction
Page: 734
View: 1895

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Recounts the causes and history of the wars between the Greek city-states and Persia.

Traces of the Past

Classics Between History and Archaeology
Author: Karen Bassi
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
ISBN: 0472119923
Category: History
Page: 256
View: 8893

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What are we doing when we walk into an archaeological museum or onto an archaeological site? What do the objects and features we encounter in these unique places mean and, more specifically, how do they convey to us something about the beliefs and activities of formerly living humans? In short, how do visible remains and ruins in the present give meaning to the human past? Karen Bassi addresses these questions through detailed close readings of canonical works spanning the archaic to the classical periods of ancient Greek culture, showing how the past is constituted in descriptions of what narrators and characters see in their present context. She introduces the term protoarchaeological to refer to narratives that navigate the gap between linguistic representation and empirical observation—between words and things—in accessing and giving meaning to the past. Such narratives invite readers to view the past as a receding visual field and, in the process, to cross the disciplinary boundaries that divide literature, history, and archaeology. Aimed at classicists, literary scholars, ancient historians, cultural historians, and archaeological theorists, the book combines three areas of research: time as a feature of narrative structure in literary theory; the concept of “the past itself” in the philosophy of history; and the ontological status of material objects in archaeological theory. Each of five central chapters explores how specific protoarchaeological narratives—from the fate of Zeus’ stone in Hesiod’s Theogony to the contest between words and objects in Aristophanes’ Frogs—both expose and attempt to bridge this gap. Throughout, the book serves as a response to Herodotus’ task in writing the Histories, namely, to ensure that “the past deeds of men do not fade with time.”