Scottsboro

A Tragedy of the American South
Author: Dan T. Carter
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 9780807135235
Category: History
Page: 432
View: 3972

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Although Scottsboro disappeared from the nation's headlines after 1937, it returned with the telecast of the 1976 "docudrama," Judge Horton and the Scottsboro Boys. Based on Dan Carter's Bancroft Prize-winning account of the controversial Alabama incident and its aftermath, the television production served as a catalyst for the return to public life of three key individuals in the case. In a chapter written especially for this revised edition of his modern classic, Carter recounts the latest turns in the case. Included are the surprising story of the last surviving Scottsboro defendant and the vivid description of Victoria Prices' libel suit against the network that televised the drama and the subsequent trial -- presumably the last of the Scottsboro trials. Along with this new material Carter provides fresh personal and historical insights into the case and reflects on the way the South has changed since Scottsboro first claimed the nation's attention.

The Tragedy of White Justice


Author: Marcus Garvey
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781684221516
Category: Poetry
Page: 28
View: 1312

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2017 Reprint of 1935 Edition. When he published this third edition in 1935, Garvey described The Tragedy of White Injustice in these terms: "It must be remembered that this is not an attempt at poetry: it is just a peculiar style of using facts as they impress me as I go through the pages of history and as I look at and note the conduct of the white race." Garvey wrote this "epic poem" in 1927 while in an Atlanta prison. Its first and second editions were published while he was serving a five-year sentence "as the result of the white man's prejudice in America." According to him, at the time of publishing the third edition, thousands of copies had already been circulated all over the world.

Seam


Author: Tarfia Faizullah
Publisher: SIU Press
ISBN: 0809333260
Category: Poetry
Page: 65
View: 9467

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The poems in this captivating collection weave beauty with violence, the personal with the historic as they recount the harrowing experiences of the two hundred thousand female victims of rape and torture at the hands of the Pakistani army during the 1971 Liberation War. As the child of Bangladeshi immigrants, the poet in turn explores her own losses, as well as the complexities of bearing witness to the atrocities these war heroines endured. Throughout the volume, the narrator endeavors to bridge generational and cultural gaps even as the victims recount the horror of grief and personal loss. As we read, we discover the profound yet fragile seam that unites the fields, rivers, and prisons of the 1971 war with the poet’s modern-day hotel, or the tragic death of a loved one with the holocaust of a nation. Moving from West Texas to Dubai, from Virginia to remote villages in Bangladesh and back again, the narrator calls on the legacies of Willa Cather, César Vallejo, Tomas Tranströmer, and Paul Celan to give voice to the voiceless. Fierce yet loving, devastating and magical at once, Seam is a testament to the lingering potency of memory and the bravery of a nation’s victims. Winner, Great Lakes Colleges Association New Writers Award, 2014 Winner, Binghamton University Milt Kessler Poetry Book Award, 2015 Winner, Drake University Emerging Writers Award, 2015

A Tragedy of Democracy

Japanese Confinement in North America
Author: Greg Robinson
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231520123
Category: History
Page: 408
View: 9843

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The confinement of some 120,000 Japanese Americans during World War II, often called the Japanese American internment, has been described as the worst official civil rights violation of modern U. S. history. Greg Robinson not only offers a bold new understanding of these events but also studies them within a larger time frame and from a transnational perspective. Drawing on newly discovered material, Robinson provides a backstory of confinement that reveals for the first time the extent of the American government's surveillance of Japanese communities in the years leading up to war and the construction of what officials termed "concentration camps" for enemy aliens. He also considers the aftermath of confinement, including the place of Japanese Americans in postwar civil rights struggles, the long movement by former camp inmates for redress, and the continuing role of the camps as touchstones for nationwide commemoration and debate. Most remarkably, A Tragedy of Democracy is the first book to analyze official policy toward West Coast Japanese Americans within a North American context. Robinson studies confinement on the mainland alongside events in wartime Hawaii, where fears of Japanese Americans justified Army dictatorship, suspension of the Constitution, and the imposition of military tribunals. He similarly reads the treatment of Japanese Americans against Canada's confinement of 22,000 citizens and residents of Japanese ancestry from British Columbia. A Tragedy of Democracy recounts the expulsion of almost 5,000 Japanese from Mexico's Pacific Coast and the poignant story of the Japanese Latin Americans who were kidnapped from their homes and interned in the United States. Approaching Japanese confinement as a continental and international phenomenon, Robinson offers a truly kaleidoscopic understanding of its genesis and outcomes. The confinement of some 120,000 Japanese Americans during World War II, often called the Japanese American internment, has been described as the worst official civil rights violation of modern U. S. history. Greg Robinson not only offers a bold new understanding of these events but also studies them within a larger time frame and from a transnational perspective. Drawing on newly discovered material, Robinson provides a backstory of confinement that reveals for the first time the extent of the American government's surveillance of Japanese communities in the years leading up to war and the construction of what officials termed "concentration camps" for enemy aliens. He also considers the aftermath of confinement, including the place of Japanese Americans in postwar civil rights struggles, the long movement by former camp inmates for redress, and the continuing role of the camps as touchstones for nationwide commemoration and debate. Most remarkably, A Tragedy of Democracy is the first book to analyze official policy toward West Coast Japanese Americans within a North American context. Robinson studies confinement on the mainland alongside events in wartime Hawaii, where fears of Japanese Americans justified Army dictatorship, suspension of the Constitution, and the imposition of military tribunals. He similarly reads the treatment of Japanese Americans against Canada's confinement of 22,000 citizens and residents of Japanese ancestry from British Columbia. A Tragedy of Democracy recounts the expulsion of almost 5,000 Japanese from Mexico's Pacific Coast and the poignant story of the Japanese Latin Americans who were kidnapped from their homes and interned in the United States. Approaching Japanese confinement as a continental and international phenomenon, Robinson offers a truly kaleidoscopic understanding of its genesis and outcomes.

The Tragedy of Today's Gays


Author: Larry Kramer
Publisher: Tarcher
ISBN: 9781585424276
Category: Social Science
Page: 108
View: 787

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Discusses the current situation of gay men and women in the United States, maintaining that the current conservative agenda and the gay community's own lack of political involvement have eroded their legal rights.

M-A-C-N-O-L-I-A

Poems
Author: A. Van Jordan
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393059076
Category: Poetry
Page: 134
View: 2691

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MacNolia Cox won the Akron District Spelling Bee, and at the age of 13 she became the first African American to reach the final round of the national competition. The Southern judges, it is thought, kept her from winning by presenting a word not on the official list. The word that tripped MacNolia, ironically, was "nemesis." When she died 40 years later, the girl who "was almost/ The national spelling champ" had become a cleaning woman, a grandmother, and "the best damn maid in town." Cox's ambition and her later frustration find incisive shape in this remarkably varied meditation on ambition, racism, discouragement and ennui, where successive pages can bring to mind a handbook of poetic forms (a double sestina, Japanese-inspired syllabics, a blues ghazal and prose poems based on definitions of prepositions), Ann Carson's "TV Men" poems, Rita Dove's Thomas and Beulah and the documentary film Spellbound. Jordan (Rise) begins in Cox's later life, giving voice to her husband, John Montiere, at "The Moment Before He Asks MacNolia Out on a Date," then to MacNolia herself when in 1970 her son dies just after his return from Vietnam. As counterpoints, Jordan intersperses poems about African-Americans who won more lasting public acclaim, among them Richard Pryor, Josephine Baker and the great labor organizer and orator A. Philip Randolph. Jordan's most quotable poems, however, return to the voice of the 13-year-old speller, who "learned the word chiaroscuro/ By rolling it on my tongue// Like cotton candy the color/ Of day and night." (June) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information. Library Journal

Anagnorisis

Poems
Author: Kyle Dargan
Publisher: Northwestern University Press
ISBN: 0810137852
Category: Poetry
Page: 96
View: 2516

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In Anagnorisis: Poems, the award-winning poet Kyle Dargan ignites a reckoning. From the depths of his rapidly changing home of Washington, D.C., the poet is both enthralled and provoked, having witnessed-on a digital loop running in the background of Barack Obama's unlikely presidency—the rampant state-sanctioned murder of fellow African Americans. He is pushed toward the same recognition articulated by James Baldwin decades earlier: that an African American may never be considered an equal in citizenship or humanity. This recognition—the moment at which a tragic hero realizes the true nature of his own character, condition, or relationship with an antagonistic entity—is what Aristotle called anagnorisis. Not concerned with placatory gratitude nor with coddling the sensibilities of the country's racial majority, Dargan challenges America: "You, friends- / you peckish for a peek / at my cloistered, incandescent / revelry-were you as earnest / about my frostbite, my burns, / I would have opened / these hands, sated you all." At a time when U.S. politics are heavily invested in the purported vulnerability of working-class and rural white Americans, these poems allow readers to examine themselves and the nation through the eyes of those who have been burned for centuries.

The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace

A Brilliant Young Man Who Left Newark for the Ivy League
Author: Jeff Hobbs
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1476731918
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 432
View: 3232

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Traces a young man's effort to escape the dangers of the streets and his own nature after graduating from Yale, describing his youth in violent 1980s Newark, efforts to navigate two fiercely insular worlds and life-ending drug deals. 75,000 first printing.

Picking Cotton

Our Memoir of Injustice and Redemption
Author: Jennifer Thompson-Cannino,Ronald Cotton,Erin Torneo
Publisher: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 1429962151
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 304
View: 7393

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The New York Times best selling true story of an unlikely friendship forged between a woman and the man she incorrectly identified as her rapist and sent to prison for 11 years. Jennifer Thompson was raped at knifepoint by a man who broke into her apartment while she slept. She was able to escape, and eventually positively identified Ronald Cotton as her attacker. Ronald insisted that she was mistaken-- but Jennifer's positive identification was the compelling evidence that put him behind bars. After eleven years, Ronald was allowed to take a DNA test that proved his innocence. He was released, after serving more than a decade in prison for a crime he never committed. Two years later, Jennifer and Ronald met face to face-- and forged an unlikely friendship that changed both of their lives. With Picking Cotton, Jennifer and Ronald tell in their own words the harrowing details of their tragedy, and challenge our ideas of memory and judgment while demonstrating the profound nature of human grace and the healing power of forgiveness.

Innocent Victims

Poetic Injustice in Shakespearean Tragedy
Author: R.S. White
Publisher: A&C Black
ISBN: 0567618498
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 149
View: 4574

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This is a revised version of the book which was privately published by the author in 1982. At the time, the book was widely welcomed by Shakespearean scholars as a trenchant, scholarly and highly orginal contribution to the field of Shakespearean studies. The book's argument is that a full response to Shakespearean tragedy has to take account of the fate of the victims as well as of the tragic heroesl and this thesis is illustrated and developed by a consideration of Lavinia, Lucrece and the children in Richard III, Macbeth and King John; and to the thee principal Shakespearean tragic victims, Ophelia, Desemona and Cordelia.

Last Man Standing

The Tragedy and Triumph of Geronimo Pratt
Author: Jack Olsen
Publisher: Anchor
ISBN: 0385493681
Category: Law
Page: 512
View: 5992

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Describes the twenty-seven-year battle to vindicate Elmer Gerard "Geronimo" Pratt, a Vietnam veteran and Black Panther Party leader convicted in a trumped-up case of murder, in an intriguing study of government conspiracy and judicial abuse. Reprint. 30,000 first printing.

Stories of Scottsboro


Author: James Goodman
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0804151687
Category: Social Science
Page: 496
View: 7546

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"A rich and compelling narrative, as taut and suspenseful as good fiction. In places, Stories of Scottsboro is almost heartbreaking, not least because Goodman shows what people felt as well as what they thought." -- Washington Post Book World To white Southerners, it was "a heinous and unspeakable crime" that flouted a taboo as old as slavery. To the Communist Party, which mounted the defense, the Scottsboro case was an ideal opportunity to unite issues of race and class. To jury after jury, the idea that nine black men had raped two white women on a train traveling through northern Alabama in 1931 was so self-evident that they found the Scottsboro boys guilty even after the U.S. Supreme Court had twice struck down the verdict and one of the "victims" had recanted. This innovative and grippingly narrated work of history tells the story of a case that marked a watershed in American racial justice. Or, rather, it tells several stories. For out of dozens of period sources, Stories of Scottsboro re-creates not only what happened at Scottsboro, but the dissonant chords it struck in the hearts and minds of an entire nation. "Extraordinary.... To do justice to the Scottsboro story a book would have to combine edge-of-the-seat reportage and epic narrative sweep. And it is just such a book that James Goodman has given us, a beautifully realized history...written with complete authority, tight emotional control, and brilliant use of archival material." -- Chicago Tribune

Thunder in the Mountains: Chief Joseph, Oliver Otis Howard, and the Nez Perce War


Author: Daniel J. Sharfstein
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393634183
Category: History
Page: 384
View: 7139

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“Beautifully wrought and impossible to put down, Daniel Sharfstein’s Thunder in the Mountains chronicles with compassion and grace that resonant past we should never forget.”—Brenda Wineapple, author of Ecstatic Nation: Confidence, Crisis, and Compromise, 1848–1877 After the Civil War and Reconstruction, a new struggle raged in the Northern Rockies. In the summer of 1877, General Oliver Otis Howard, a champion of African American civil rights, ruthlessly pursued hundreds of Nez Perce families who resisted moving onto a reservation. Standing in his way was Chief Joseph, a young leader who never stopped advocating for Native American sovereignty and equal rights. Thunder in the Mountains is the spellbinding story of two legendary figures and their epic clash of ideas about the meaning of freedom and the role of government in American life.

Murdered by Mumia

A Life Sentence of Loss, Pain, and Injustice
Author: Maureen Faulkner,Michael Smerconish
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 0762799021
Category: Law
Page: 368
View: 4081

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New and updated in paperback! Maureen Faulkner is the widow of police officer Danny Faulkner, infamously murdered in Philadelphia in 1981 by Wesley Cook, who goes by the name of Mumia Abu-Jamal. Although Abu-Jamal was convicted and sentenced to death in 1982, in May of 2007 his attorneys appealed his sentence once more (the federal appeals court has not yet ruled). The defendant has become an international cult figure, who has been supported by such Hollywood activists as Ed Asner, Tim Robbins, and Susan Sarandon. Faulkner and radio-host Smerconish tell the other side of the story: the widow's anguish and grief and her attempts to bring closure to her husband's murder more than 25 years later. Smerconish (who is also a lawyer) has studied the 5,000 pages of trial transcripts (transcripts Asner readily admits he has never looked at), and outlines and analyzes the issues and evidence. The case is compelling, and the reader comes away convinced – as is Smerconish – that Abu-Jamal is guilty as charged. It is a latter-day In Cold Blood.

The Myth of Equality

Uncovering the Roots of Injustice and Privilege
Author: Ken Wytsma
Publisher: InterVarsity Press
ISBN: 0830881085
Category: Religion
Page: 208
View: 9970

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Is privilege real or imagined?The Myth of Equality

The Color of Money

Black Banks and the Racial Wealth Gap
Author: Mehrsa Baradaran
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674982304
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 360
View: 7960

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In 1863 black communities owned less than 1 percent of total U.S. wealth. Today that number has barely budged. Mehrsa Baradaran pursues this wealth gap by focusing on black banks. She challenges the myth that black banking is the solution to the racial wealth gap and argues that black communities can never accumulate wealth in a segregated economy.

Black Like Me


Author: John Howard Griffin,Robert Bonazzi
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0451234219
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 200
View: 9341

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A white writer recounts his experiences in the American South following treatments that darkened his skin and shares his thoughts on the problems of prejudice and racial injustice.