The Story of Nursing in British Mental Hospitals

Echoes from the Corridors
Author: Niall McCrae,Peter Nolan
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317812395
Category: Medical
Page: 336
View: 1795

Continue Reading →

From their beginnings as the asylum attendants of the 19th century, mental health nurses have come a long way. This comprehensive volume is the first book in over twenty years to explore the history of mental health nursing, and during this period the landscape has transformed as the large institutions have been replaced by services in the community. McCrae and Nolan examine how the role of mental health nursing has evolved in a social and professional context, brought to life by an abundance of anecdotal accounts. Moving from the early nineteenth to the end of the twentieth century, the book’s nine chronologically-ordered chapters follow the development from untrained attendants in the pauper lunatic asylums to the professionally-qualified nurses of the twentieth century, and, finally, consider the rundown and closure of the mental hospitals from nurses’ perspectives. Throughout, the argument is made that whilst the training, organisation and environment of mental health nursing has changed, the aim has remained essentially the same: to develop a therapeutic relationship with people in distress. McCrae and Nolan look forward as well as back, and highlight significant messages for the future of mental health care. For mental health nursing to be meaningfully directed, we must first understand the place from which this field has developed. This scholarly but accessible book is aimed at anyone with an interest in mental health or social history, and will also act as a useful resource for policy-makers, managers and mental health workers.

Loss, Dying and Bereavement in the Criminal Justice System


Author: Sue Read,Sotirios Santatzoglou,Anthony Wrigley
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351981242
Category: Social Science
Page: 208
View: 7257

Continue Reading →

Life is characterised by movement, change and development, including transitions, losses and grief. People experiencing loss must learn to accommodate it and, sometimes, relearn new roles. Whether the offender is accommodating general loss (such as transition), the loss of others or facing their own impending death, the bereavement process can become a particularly complicated experience for those involved in the criminal justice system. Criminal offenders may be excluded from participating in grief rituals and may receive few explicit opportunities to talk about a loss they’ve experienced, sometimes resulting in disenfranchised grief. Informing thinking around assessment, care, and support procedures, this volume seeks to bring together a range of perspectives from different disciplines on crucial issues surrounding the impact of loss, death, dying and bereavement for criminal offenders. The book will explore inherent challenges and responses to the criminal justice system by considering to what extent offenders’ loss, death, dying and bereavement experiences have been - or should be - recognised in policy and practice. The first section considers theoretical approaches to loss; the next section translates these issues using professional perspectives to explore practical applications; and the final section introduces an offender perspective. Through identifying challenges and consolidating evidence, this multidisciplinary book will interest researchers interested in loss and bereavement in vulnerable communities, concepts of disenfranchised grief, end-of-life care and mental healthcare in the criminal justice system.

Partiality and Justice in Nursing Care


Author: Marita Nordhaug
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1351812521
Category:
Page: N.A
View: 7822

Continue Reading →

Partiality and Justice in Nursing Care examines the conflicting normative claims of partiality and impartiality in nursing care, looking in depth at how to reconcile reasonable concerns for one particular patient with equally important concerns for the maximisation of health-related welfare for all with relevant nursing-care needs, in a resource-limited setting. Drawing on moral philosophy, this book explores how discussions of partiality and impartiality in moral philosophy can have relevance to the professional context of clinical nursing care as well as in nursing ethics in general. It develops a framework for normative nursing ethics that incorporates a notion of permissible partiality, and specifies which concerns an ethics of nursing care should entail when balancing partialist and impartialist concerns. At the same time, Nordhaug argues that this partiality must also be constrained by both principled and context-sensitive assessments of patients' needs, as well as of the role-relative deontological restriction of minimising harm, something that could be mitigated by institutional and organisational arrangements. This thought-provoking volume is an important contribution to nursing ethics and philosophy.

The Moon and Madness


Author: Niall McCrae
Publisher: Andrews UK Limited
ISBN: 1845403304
Category: Medical
Page: 262
View: 2739

Continue Reading →

Lunacy, the legendary notion of minds unhinged by the moon, continues to captivate the popular imagination. Although it violates the assumptions of modern science and psychiatry, such belief remains common among mental health workers. Furthermore, several studies have found a small, unexplained correlation between behaviour and the lunar cycle. The book is divided into two parts. It begins with a historical account of the lunacy concept, followed by an investigation of hypothetical mechanisms for a lunar effect.

The Wretched of the Earth


Author: Frantz Fanon
Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.
ISBN: 9780802198853
Category: Political Science
Page: 320
View: 5593

Continue Reading →

Frantz Fanon was one of the twentieth century’s most important theorists of revolution, colonialism, and racial difference, and this, his masterwork, is a classic alongside Orientalism and The Autobiography of Malcolm X. The Wretched of the Earth is a brilliant analysis of the psychology of the colonized and their path to liberation. Bearing singular insight into the rage of colonized peoples and the role of violence in historical change, the book also incisively attacks postindependence disenfranchisement of the masses by the elite on one hand, and intertribal and interfaith animosities on the other. A veritable handbook of social reorganization for leaders of emerging nations, The Wretched of the Earth has had a major impact on civil rights, anticolonialism, and black-consciousness movements around the world. This new translation updates its language for a new generation of readers and its lessons are more vital now than ever.

Mental Health Policy And Practice Across Europe


Author: Knapp, Martin,McDaid, David,Mossialos, Elias
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education (UK)
ISBN: 9780335214679
Category: Medical
Page: 452
View: 716

Continue Reading →

This book maps the current state of policy, service provision and funding for mental health care across Europe, taking into account the differing historical contexts that have shaped both the development and the delivery of services.

Are Prisons Obsolete?


Author: Angela Y. Davis
Publisher: Seven Stories Press
ISBN: 1609801040
Category: Political Science
Page: 129
View: 3478

Continue Reading →

With her characteristic brilliance, grace and radical audacity, Angela Y. Davis has put the case for the latest abolition movement in American life: the abolition of the prison. As she quite correctly notes, American life is replete with abolition movements, and when they were engaged in these struggles, their chances of success seemed almost unthinkable. For generations of Americans, the abolition of slavery was sheerest illusion. Similarly,the entrenched system of racial segregation seemed to last forever, and generations lived in the midst of the practice, with few predicting its passage from custom. The brutal, exploitative (dare one say lucrative?) convict-lease system that succeeded formal slavery reaped millions to southern jurisdictions (and untold miseries for tens of thousands of men, and women). Few predicted its passing from the American penal landscape. Davis expertly argues how social movements transformed these social, political and cultural institutions, and made such practices untenable. In Are Prisons Obsolete?, Professor Davis seeks to illustrate that the time for the prison is approaching an end. She argues forthrightly for "decarceration", and argues for the transformation of the society as a whole.

Putting a Name to It

Diagnosis in Contemporary Society
Author: Annemarie Goldstein Jutel
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 9781421401072
Category: Medical
Page: 200
View: 7207

Continue Reading →

Jutel’s innovative, open approach and engaging arguments will find support among medical sociologists and practitioners and across much of the medical system.

Humanitarian Negotiations Revealed

The MSF Experience
Author: Claire Magone,Michael Neuman,Fabrice Weissman
Publisher: Hurst
ISBN: 1849045267
Category: Political Science
Page: 256
View: 6541

Continue Reading →

From international NGOs to UN agencies, from donors to observers of humanitarianism, opinion is unanimous: in a context of the alleged "clash of civilizations", our "humanitarian space" is shrinking. Put another way, the freedom of action and of speech of humanitarians is being eroded due to the radicalisation of conflicts and the reaffirmation of state sovereignty over aid actors and policies. The purpose of this book is to challenge this assumption through an analysis of the events that have marked MSF's history since 2003 (when MSF published its first general work on humanitarian action and its relationships with governments). It addresses the evolution of humanitarian goals, the resistance to these goals and the political arrangements that overcame this resistance (or that failed to do so). The contributors seek to analyse the political transactions and balances of power and interests that allow aid activities to move forward, but that are usually masked by the lofty rhetoric of "humanitarian principles". They focus on one key question: what is an acceptable compromise for MSF? This book seeks to puncture a number of the myths that have grown up over the forty years since MSF was founded and describes in detail how the ideals of humanitarian principles and "humanitarian space" operating in conflict zones are in reality illusory. How, in fact, it is the grubby negotiations with varying parties, each of whom have their own vested interests, that may allow organisations such as MSF to operate in a given crisis situation - or not.

A History of Mental Health Nursing


Author: Peter Nolan
Publisher: Nelson Thornes
ISBN: 9780748737215
Category: Medical
Page: 178
View: 5515

Continue Reading →

Psychiatric nursing is traced, in this book, from the role of keeper to mental-health nurse. The language of psychiatry includes lunacy, workhouses, asylums, moral defection, attendants and mental nursing, through to the current emphasis on community mental-health care. The author observes the speed with which new ideas have been absorbed into clinical practice - and the equal speed with which they became and do become outdated and discredited. The implication is that society has still a long way to go in both the understanding and the response to the problems of life that have been observed and documented since man began to contemplate and write.

Avoiding Politics

How Americans Produce Apathy in Everyday Life
Author: Nina Eliasoph
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521587594
Category: Political Science
Page: 330
View: 2137

Continue Reading →

Nina Eliasoph's vivid portrait of American civic life reveals an intriguing culture of political avoidance. Despite the importance for democracy of open-ended political conversation among ordinary citizens, many Americans try hard to avoid appearing to care about politics. To discover how, where and why Americans create this culture of avoidance, the author accompanied suburban volunteers, activists, and recreation club members for over two years, listening to them talk - and avoid talking - about the wider world, together and in encounters with government, media, and corporate authorities. She shows how citizens create and express ideas in everyday life, contrasting their privately expressed convictions with their lack of public political engagement. Her book challenges received ideas about culture, power and democracy, while exposing the hard work of producing apathy.

Analytic Narratives


Author: Robert H. Bates
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9780691001296
Category: Political Science
Page: 249
View: 5535

Continue Reading →

How can social scientists draw broad, applicable principles of political order from specific historical examples? In this volume, five senior scholars offer a methodological response to this question. The result is both a methodological manifesto and an applied handbook.

Curing Queers

Mental Nurses and Their Patients
Author: Tommy Dickinson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 1784993581
Category:
Page: 272
View: 1265

Continue Reading →

Drawing on a rich array of source materials including previously unseen, fascinating (and often quite moving) oral histories, archival and news media sources, 'Curing queers' examines the plight of men who were institutionalised in British mental hospitals to receive 'treatment' for homosexuality and transvestism, and the perceptions and actions of the men and women who nursed them. It examines why the majority of the nurses followed orders in administering the treatment in spite of the zero success-rate in 'straightening out' queer men but also why a small number surreptitiously defied their superiors by engaging in fascinating subversive behaviours. 'Curing queers' makes a significant and substantial contribution to the history of nursing and the history of sexuality, bringing together two sub-disciplines that combine only infrequently. It will be of interest to general readers as well as scholars and students in nursing, history, gender studies, and health care ethics and law.

How the Law Works


Author: Gary Slapper
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317218019
Category: Law
Page: 320
View: 611

Continue Reading →

‘How the Law Works is a gem of a book, for law students and for everyone else. It is a must read for anyone interested in how society is shaped and controlled via law.’ Dr Steven Vaughan, solicitor, Senior Lecturer, Birmingham Law School ‘How the Law Works is a comprehensive, witty and easy-to-read guide to the law. I thoroughly recommend it to non-lawyers who want to improve their knowledge of the legal system and to potential students as an introduction to the law of England and Wales.’ HH Judge Lynn Tayton QC Reviews of the first edition: ‘A friendly, readable and surprisingly entertaining overview of what can be a daunting and arcane subject to the outsider.’ The Law Teacher ‘An easy-to-read, fascinating book . . . brimful with curios, anecdote and explanation.’ The Times How the Law Works is a refreshingly clear and reliable guide to today’s legal system. Offering interesting and comprehensive coverage, it makes sense of all the curious features of the law in day to day life and in current affairs. Explaining the law and legal jargon in plain English, it provides an accessible entry point to the different types of law and legal techniques, as well as today’s compensation culture and human rights law. In addition to explaining the role of judges, lawyers, juries and parliament, it clarifies the mechanisms behind criminal and civil law. How the Law Works is essential reading for anyone approaching law for the first time, or for anyone who is interested in an engaging introduction to the subject’s bigger picture.

Mediating Madness

Mental Distress and Cultural Representation
Author: S. Cross
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230276075
Category: Social Science
Page: 202
View: 8124

Continue Reading →

Mediating Madness examines how mediations of madness emerge, disappear and interleave, only to re-emerge at unexpected moments. Drawing on social and cultural histories of madness, history of art, and popular journalism, the book offers a unique interdisciplinary understanding of historical and contemporary media representations of madness.

A History of Apprenticeship Nurse Training in Ireland


Author: Gerard Fealy
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134239084
Category: Education
Page: 216
View: 9383

Continue Reading →

Based on new research using previously unpublished sources, this compelling text is an in-depth study of the history of nurse education in Ireland, presenting a new authoritative account of the history of the traditional system of training in Ireland. Introduced as part of the reforms of hospital nursing in the late nineteenth century, apprenticeship nurse training was a vocational extension of secondary education. Residing outside the mainstream of higher educational provision it provided nurses with the knowledge and technical skills for sick nursing, whilst also functioning to socialise them into the role of hospital worker and introduce to them nursing’s value systems. This method of training provided a ready supply of skilled, efficient, inexpensive and loyal workers. In a chronological period spanning over a century, the book traces the development of modern nursing in Ireland, bringing the hidden role of nurses and nursing to the fore. It analyzes and describes the development, provision and gradual reform of hospital nursing, taking into account the social, cultural, political and economic factors that led to its establishment, its continuance, and eventual demise.

Sisters of the Somme

True Stories from a First World War Field Hospital
Author: Penny Starns
Publisher: The History Press
ISBN: 0750968850
Category: History
Page: 224
View: 1188

Continue Reading →

Following the outbreak WWI, the British Red Cross appealed for volunteers to train as frontline medical staff, and a major volunteer field hospital was built at Etaples in France. Women volunteered for a variety of reasons. Some believed that they were responding to a vocational or religious calling, others were following a sweetheart to the front, whereas others had been carried away on the wave of jingoistic patriotism that had gripped the nation in 1914. One such volunteer was Lily Fielding. Despite her training, however, Lily and the young friends she was to make at the Somme were ill-prepared for the stench of gangrene and trench foot. Isolated as they were from friends and family at home, they forged new and close relationships with one another, establishing a camaraderie that was to last the entire war and beyond.This book is a heartwarming account of life in one field hospital at the Somme, based on the true stories of the nurses who were there.

Double Burden: Black Women and Everyday Racism

Black Women and Everyday Racism
Author: Yanick St Jean,Joe R Feagin
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317472810
Category: Social Science
Page: 256
View: 7269

Continue Reading →

Studies of contemporary black women are rare and scattered, and are often extensions of a legacy beginning in the 19th century that characterized black women as domineering matriarchs, prostitutes, or welfare queens, negative characterizations that are perpetuated by both white and non-white social scientists. Based on over 200 interviews, this book departs from these conventions in significant ways, and, using a "collective memory" conceptual framework, shows how black women cope with and interpret lives often limited by racial barriers not of their making.