The Story of Nursing in British Mental Hospitals

Echoes from the Corridors
Author: Niall McCrae,Peter Nolan
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317812387
Category: Medical
Page: 336
View: 7517

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From their beginnings as the asylum attendants of the 19th century, mental health nurses have come a long way. This comprehensive volume is the first book in over twenty years to explore the history of mental health nursing, and during this period the landscape has transformed as the large institutions have been replaced by services in the community. McCrae and Nolan examine how the role of mental health nursing has evolved in a social and professional context, brought to life by an abundance of anecdotal accounts. Moving from the early nineteenth to the end of the twentieth century, the book’s nine chronologically-ordered chapters follow the development from untrained attendants in the pauper lunatic asylums to the professionally-qualified nurses of the twentieth century, and, finally, consider the rundown and closure of the mental hospitals from nurses’ perspectives. Throughout, the argument is made that whilst the training, organisation and environment of mental health nursing has changed, the aim has remained essentially the same: to develop a therapeutic relationship with people in distress. McCrae and Nolan look forward as well as back, and highlight significant messages for the future of mental health care. For mental health nursing to be meaningfully directed, we must first understand the place from which this field has developed. This scholarly but accessible book is aimed at anyone with an interest in mental health or social history, and will also act as a useful resource for policy-makers, managers and mental health workers.

Loss, Dying and Bereavement in the Criminal Justice System


Author: Sue Read,Sotirios Santatzoglou,Anthony Wrigley
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351981242
Category: Social Science
Page: 208
View: 1635

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Life is characterised by movement, change and development, including transitions, losses and grief. People experiencing loss must learn to accommodate it and, sometimes, relearn new roles. Whether the offender is accommodating general loss (such as transition), the loss of others or facing their own impending death, the bereavement process can become a particularly complicated experience for those involved in the criminal justice system. Criminal offenders may be excluded from participating in grief rituals and may receive few explicit opportunities to talk about a loss they’ve experienced, sometimes resulting in disenfranchised grief. Informing thinking around assessment, care, and support procedures, this volume seeks to bring together a range of perspectives from different disciplines on crucial issues surrounding the impact of loss, death, dying and bereavement for criminal offenders. The book will explore inherent challenges and responses to the criminal justice system by considering to what extent offenders’ loss, death, dying and bereavement experiences have been - or should be - recognised in policy and practice. The first section considers theoretical approaches to loss; the next section translates these issues using professional perspectives to explore practical applications; and the final section introduces an offender perspective. Through identifying challenges and consolidating evidence, this multidisciplinary book will interest researchers interested in loss and bereavement in vulnerable communities, concepts of disenfranchised grief, end-of-life care and mental healthcare in the criminal justice system.

Partiality and Justice in Nursing Care


Author: Marita Nordhaug
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1351812521
Category:
Page: N.A
View: 9666

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Partiality and Justice in Nursing Care examines the conflicting normative claims of partiality and impartiality in nursing care, looking in depth at how to reconcile reasonable concerns for one particular patient with equally important concerns for the maximisation of health-related welfare for all with relevant nursing-care needs, in a resource-limited setting. Drawing on moral philosophy, this book explores how discussions of partiality and impartiality in moral philosophy can have relevance to the professional context of clinical nursing care as well as in nursing ethics in general. It develops a framework for normative nursing ethics that incorporates a notion of permissible partiality, and specifies which concerns an ethics of nursing care should entail when balancing partialist and impartialist concerns. At the same time, Nordhaug argues that this partiality must also be constrained by both principled and context-sensitive assessments of patients' needs, as well as of the role-relative deontological restriction of minimising harm, something that could be mitigated by institutional and organisational arrangements. This thought-provoking volume is an important contribution to nursing ethics and philosophy.

The Moon and Madness


Author: Niall McCrae
Publisher: Andrews UK Limited
ISBN: 1845403304
Category: Medical
Page: 262
View: 4158

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Lunacy, the legendary notion of minds unhinged by the moon, continues to captivate the popular imagination. Although it violates the assumptions of modern science and psychiatry, such belief remains common among mental health workers. Furthermore, several studies have found a small, unexplained correlation between behaviour and the lunar cycle. The book is divided into two parts. It begins with a historical account of the lunacy concept, followed by an investigation of hypothetical mechanisms for a lunar effect.

Digital Technologies and Generational Identity

ICT Usage Across the Life Course
Author: Sakari Taipale,Terhi-Anna Wilska,Chris Gilleard
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315398605
Category: Social Science
Page: 230
View: 6063

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The short lifetime of digital technologies means that generational identities are difficult to establish around any particular technologies let alone around more far-reaching socio-technological ‘revolutions’. Examining the consumption and use of digital technologies throughout the stages of human development, this book provides a valuable overview of ICT usage and generational differences. It focuses on the fields of home, family and consumption as key arenas where these processes are being enacted, sometimes strengthening old distinctions, sometimes creating new ones, always embodying an inherent restlessness that affects all aspects and all stages of life. Combining a collection of international perspectives from a range of fields, including social gerontology, social policy, sociology, anthropology and gender studies, Digital Technologies and Generational Identity weaves empirical evidence with theoretical insights on the role of digital technologies across the life course. It takes a unique post-Mannheimian standpoint, arguing that each life stage can be defined by attitudes towards, and experiences of, digital technologies as these act as markers of generational differences and identity. It will be of particular value to academics of social policy and sociology with interests in the life course and human development as well as those studying media and communication, youth and childhood studies, and gerontology.

Mental Health Services: A Public Health Perspective


Author: Bruce Lubotsky Levin MD,Kevin D. Hennessy,John Petrila JD, LLM
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199780150
Category: Medical
Page: 576
View: 3656

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This revised and expanded third edition text utilizes a public health framework and the latest epidemiological, treatment, and service systems research to promote a comprehensive understanding of the organization, financing, and delivery of mental health and substance abuse services in the United States. Written by national experts in the field, this timely work will provide policymakers, administrators, clinicians, and public health and behavioral health graduate students with the knowledge base needed to manage and transform mental health service systems, both nationally and locally. The book is unique in providing a public health framework of the most significant issues facing mental health policy makers, administrators, planners, and practitioners. It combines issues (e.g., evaluation; law; ethnicity) that extend across different age groups, treatment settings, and disorders, with issues that are population and disorder specific. The publication of this book is timely for those involved with the debate over national health care reform legislation, and provides important and timely information (on populations at-risk for mental disorders, services, and systems issues) for those responsible for implementing policies and programs resulting from this reform effort.

Power, Conflict and Criminalisation


Author: Phil Scraton
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134101112
Category: Social Science
Page: 265
View: 733

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Drawing on a body of empirical, qualitative work spanning three decades, this unique text traces the significance of critical social research and critical analyses in understanding some of the most significant and controversial issues in contemporary society. Focusing on central debates in the UK and Ireland – prison protests; inner-city uprisings; deaths in custody; women’s imprisonment; transition in the north of Ireland; the ‘crisis’ in childhood; the Hillsborough and Dunblane tragedies; and the ‘war on terror’ – Phil Scraton argues that ‘marginalisation’ and ‘criminalisation’ are social forces central to the application of state power and authority. Each case study demonstrates how structural relations of power, authority and legitimacy, establish the determining contexts of everyday life, social interaction and individual opportunity. This book explores the politics and ethics of critical social research, making a persuasive case for the application of critical theory to analysing the rule of law, its enforcement and the administration of criminal justice. It is indispensable for students in the fields of criminology, criminal justice and socio-legal studies, social policy and social work.

Humanitarian Negotiations Revealed

The MSF Experience
Author: Claire Magone,Michael Neuman,Fabrice Weissman
Publisher: Hurst
ISBN: 1849045267
Category: Political Science
Page: 256
View: 3674

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From international NGOs to UN agencies, from donors to observers of humanitarianism, opinion is unanimous: in a context of the alleged "clash of civilizations", our "humanitarian space" is shrinking. Put another way, the freedom of action and of speech of humanitarians is being eroded due to the radicalisation of conflicts and the reaffirmation of state sovereignty over aid actors and policies. The purpose of this book is to challenge this assumption through an analysis of the events that have marked MSF's history since 2003 (when MSF published its first general work on humanitarian action and its relationships with governments). It addresses the evolution of humanitarian goals, the resistance to these goals and the political arrangements that overcame this resistance (or that failed to do so). The contributors seek to analyse the political transactions and balances of power and interests that allow aid activities to move forward, but that are usually masked by the lofty rhetoric of "humanitarian principles". They focus on one key question: what is an acceptable compromise for MSF? This book seeks to puncture a number of the myths that have grown up over the forty years since MSF was founded and describes in detail how the ideals of humanitarian principles and "humanitarian space" operating in conflict zones are in reality illusory. How, in fact, it is the grubby negotiations with varying parties, each of whom have their own vested interests, that may allow organisations such as MSF to operate in a given crisis situation - or not.

Umbrella


Author: Will Self
Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.
ISBN: 0802193811
Category: Fiction
Page: 448
View: 2075

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"A brother is as easily forgotten as an umbrella."—James Joyce, Ulysses Radical and uncompromising, Umbrella is a tour de force from one of England’s most acclaimed contemporary writers, and Self’s most ambitious novel to date. Moving between Edwardian London and a suburban mental hospital in 1971, Umbrella exposes the twentieth century’s technological searchlight as refracted through the dark glass of a long term mental institution. While making his first tours of the hospital at which he has just begun working, maverick psychiatrist Zachary Busner notices that many of the patients exhibit a strange physical tic: rapid, precise movements that they repeat over and over. One of these patients is Audrey Dearth, an elderly woman born in the slums of West London in 1890. Audrey’s memories of a bygone Edwardian London, her lovers, involvement with early feminist and socialist movements, and, in particular, her time working in an umbrella shop, alternate with Busner’s attempts to treat her condition and bring light to her clouded world. Busner’s investigations into Audrey’s illness lead to discoveries about her family that are shocking and tragic.

The Wretched of the Earth


Author: Frantz Fanon
Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.
ISBN: 9780802198853
Category: Political Science
Page: 320
View: 2291

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Frantz Fanon was one of the twentieth century’s most important theorists of revolution, colonialism, and racial difference, and this, his masterwork, is a classic alongside Orientalism and The Autobiography of Malcolm X. The Wretched of the Earth is a brilliant analysis of the psychology of the colonized and their path to liberation. Bearing singular insight into the rage of colonized peoples and the role of violence in historical change, the book also incisively attacks postindependence disenfranchisement of the masses by the elite on one hand, and intertribal and interfaith animosities on the other. A veritable handbook of social reorganization for leaders of emerging nations, The Wretched of the Earth has had a major impact on civil rights, anticolonialism, and black-consciousness movements around the world. This new translation updates its language for a new generation of readers and its lessons are more vital now than ever.

The Oral History Reader


Author: Robert Perks,Alistair Thomson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317371321
Category: History
Page: 722
View: 7954

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The Oral History Reader, now in its third edition, is a comprehensive, international anthology combining major, ‘classic’ articles with cutting-edge pieces on the theory, method and use of oral history. Twenty-seven new chapters introduce the most significant developments in oral history in the last decade to bring this invaluable text up to date, with new pieces on emotions and the senses, on crisis oral history, current thinking around traumatic memory, the impact of digital mobile technologies, and how oral history is being used in public contexts, with more international examples to draw in work from North and South America, Britain and Europe, Australasia, Asia and Africa. Arranged in five thematic sections, each with an introduction by the editors to contextualise the selection and review relevant literature, articles in this collection draw upon diverse oral history experiences to examine issues including: Key debates in the development of oral history over the past seventy years First hand reflections on interview practice, and issues posed by the interview relationship The nature of memory and its significance in oral history The practical and ethical issues surrounding the interpretation, presentation and public use of oral testimonies how oral history projects contribute to the study of the past and involve the wider community. The challenges and contributions of oral history projects committed to advocacy and empowerment With a revised and updated bibliography and useful contacts list, as well as a dedicated online resources page, this third edition of The Oral History Reader is the perfect tool for those encountering oral history for the first time, as well as for seasoned practitioners.

Madness and Civilization

A History of Insanity in the Age of Reason
Author: Michel Foucault
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307833100
Category: History
Page: 320
View: 5836

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Michel Foucault examines the archeology of madness in the West from 1500 to 1800 - from the late Middle Ages, when insanity was still considered part of everyday life and fools and lunatics walked the streets freely, to the time when such people began to be considered a threat, asylums were first built, and walls were erected between the "insane" and the rest of humanity.

Shifting the Blame

How Victimization Became a Criminal Defense
Author: Saundra Davis Westervelt
Publisher: Rutgers University Press
ISBN: 9780813525846
Category: Law
Page: 193
View: 1519

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More than just a study of legal history, Shifting the Blame looks at the "abuse excuse" defense as an indicator of broad social change in cultural understandings of victimization, responsibility, and womanhood. The introduction of victimization as an exculpatory condition within the context of a criminal defense tells the story of a society that has accepted victimization as a new way of explaining and excusing misbehavior. Through case law analysis, the book documents the initial development of the strategy in three different types of cases in the 1970s - "rotten social background", brainwashing, and battered women's self-defense cases. Since its initial acceptance in battered women's cases in the early 1980s, the use of the strategy has expanded to a variety of offenders in different types of relationships arguing different defenses. In lively, readable prose, Westervelt examines each form of expansion, revealing that while the expansion of the strategy has been fairly extensive, it has also been limited in some important ways. Her research shows readers that only certain types of "victims," particularly victims of physical abuse, have successfully used this defense. Shifting the Blame exposes the ways in which the acceptance of this new defense strategy illuminates a cultural shift in understandings of individual responsibility and shows how the law plays a role in defining who can be an acceptable victim. Saundra D. Westervelt is an assistant professor in the Sociology Department at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Teacher Preparation in Ireland

History, Policy and Future Directions
Author: Thomas O'Donoghue,Judith Harford,Teresa O'Doherty
Publisher: Emerald Group Publishing
ISBN: 1787145115
Category: Education
Page: 264
View: 2532

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This study of teacher preparation policy and practice in Ireland from Independence in 1921 to the present, highlights, within an international context, the extent to which the focus of preparation moved from nation-building until 1967, when free second-level education was introduced, to one concerned with improving the country’s human capital.

Marketisation, Ethics and Healthcare

Policy, Practice and Moral Formation
Author: Therese Feiler,Joshua Hordern,Andrew Papanikitas
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351736841
Category: Medical
Page: 210
View: 6291

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How does the market affect and redefine healthcare? The marketisation of Western healthcare systems has now proceeded well into its fourth decade. But the nature and meaning of the phenomenon has become increasingly opaque amidst changing discourses, policies and institutional structures. Moreover, ethics has become focussed on dealing with individual, clinical decisions and neglectful of the political economy which shapes healthcare. This interdisciplinary volume approaches marketisation by exploring the debates underlying the contemporary situation and by introducing reconstructive and reparative discourses. The first part explores contrary interpretations of ‘marketisation’ on a systemic level, with a view to organisational-ethical formation and the role of healthcare ethics. The second part presents the marketisation of healthcare at the level of policy-making, discusses the ethical ramifications of specific marketisation measures and considers the possibility of reconciling market forces with a covenantal understanding of healthcare. The final part examines healthcare workers’ and ethicists’ personal moral standing in a marketised healthcare system, with a view to preserving and enriching virtue, empathy and compassion. Fostering rich reflection on the moral implications of a marketised healthcare system, this book is suitable for health professionals and for academics and students interested in the health sciences, medical ethics and law, social and public policy, philosophy and theology.

Accountability in Nursing and Midwifery


Author: Stephen Tilley,Roger Watson
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0470777478
Category: Medical
Page: 240
View: 459

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Accountability is a key concern for nurses and midwives in the NHS today. Professional accountability—being responsible for your actions and for the outcomes of these actions—is part of the framework of clinical governance, which aims to provide good quality, cost-effective, evidence-based care. The second edition of Accountability in Nursing and Midwifery addresses current issues and key concerns in accountability, focusing on accountability in the four main branches of nursing (adult, child, learning disabilities and mental health), as well as in midwifery, community nursing, and nursing management. In an increasingly litigious society, the ethical and legal implications of accountability are growing and it is important that nurses understand the implications for everyday practice.

Experiences of Mental Health In-patient Care

Narratives From Service Users, Carers and Professionals
Author: Mark Hardcastle,David Kennard,Sheila Grandison,Leonard Fagin
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113412869X
Category: Psychology
Page: 248
View: 2772

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Commended in the Mental Health category of the 2008 BMA Medical Book Competition. This book offers an insight into the experience of psychiatric in-patient care, from both a professional and a user perspective. The editors highlight the problems in creating therapeutic environments within settings which are often poorly resourced, crisis driven and risk aversive. The contributors argue that for change to occur there needs first of all to be a genuine appreciation of the experiences of those involved in the unpredictable, anxiety-arousing and sometimes threatening environment of the psychiatric ward. Each chapter comprises a personal account of in-patient care by those in the front line: people who have been admitted to a psychiatric ward; their relatives; or those that provide the care. These accounts are followed by two commentaries written from different perspectives, suggesting lessons that can be learnt to improve the quality of care. Experiences of Mental Health In-patient Care will be useful for all mental health professionals, including mental health nurses, psychiatrists, clinical psychologists, occupational therapists, arts therapists, social workers and trainees, as well as service users and carers organisations.

A History of Mental Health Nursing


Author: Peter Nolan
Publisher: Nelson Thornes
ISBN: 9780748737215
Category: Medical
Page: 178
View: 4274

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Psychiatric nursing is traced, in this book, from the role of keeper to mental-health nurse. The language of psychiatry includes lunacy, workhouses, asylums, moral defection, attendants and mental nursing, through to the current emphasis on community mental-health care. The author observes the speed with which new ideas have been absorbed into clinical practice - and the equal speed with which they became and do become outdated and discredited. The implication is that society has still a long way to go in both the understanding and the response to the problems of life that have been observed and documented since man began to contemplate and write.

The Company of Strangers

A Natural History of Economic Life
Author: Paul Seabright
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400834785
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 400
View: 9460

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The Company of Strangers shows us the remarkable strangeness, and fragility, of our everyday lives. This completely revised and updated edition includes a new chapter analyzing how the rise and fall of social trust explain the unsustainable boom in the global economy over the past decade and the financial crisis that succeeded it. Drawing on insights from biology, anthropology, history, psychology, and literature, Paul Seabright explores how our evolved ability of abstract reasoning has allowed institutions like money, markets, cities, and the banking system to provide the foundations of social trust that we need in our everyday lives. Even the simple acts of buying food and clothing depend on an astonishing web of interaction that spans the globe. How did humans develop the ability to trust total strangers with providing our most basic needs?

Touch in the Helping Professions

Research, Practice and Ethics
Author: Martin Rovers,Judith Malette,Manal Guirguis-Younger
Publisher: University of Ottawa Press
ISBN: 0776627570
Category: Psychology
Page: 268
View: 6401

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Inappropriate touch cases have sparked public outcry and made headlines, but a discussion on the importance and ethics of positive, caring, appropriate touch in the helping professions such as teaching, nursing and counselling is long overdue.