The Sixties

Years of Hope, Days of Rage
Author: Todd Gitlin
Publisher: Bantam
ISBN: 0307834026
Category: History
Page: 544
View: 4033

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Say "the Sixties" and the images start coming, images of a time when all authority was defied and millions of young Americans thought they could change the world--either through music, drugs, and universal love or by "putting their bodies on the line" against injustice and war. Todd Gitlin, the highly regarded writer, media critic, and professor of sociology at the University of California, Berkeley, has written an authoritative and compelling account of this supercharged decade--a decade he helped shape as an early president of Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) and an organizer of the first national demonstration against the Vietnam war. Part critical history, part personal memoir, part celebration, and part meditation, this critically acclaimed work resurrects a generation on all its glory and tragedy.

The Sixties


Author: Peter Stine
Publisher: Wayne State University Press
ISBN: 9780814325582
Category: Literary Collections
Page: 284
View: 5427

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The Sixties is a powerful literary anthology written by women and men who witnessed and participated in that revolutionary decade in U.S. history. Their essays, fiction, and poetry capture the complexity of events, providing personal, reflective, and diverse testimony on a decade driven by an obsessive will to change. John Lewis's experiences with SNCC or Rosellen Brown's at Tougaloo College are moral light years removed from P.J. O'Rourke's hilarious encounter with the Balto Cong in Baltimore. It requires mind expansion to imagine Peter Najarian's first exposure to the counterculture in San Francisco as contemporaneous with Richard Currey's initiation into killing in Vietnam. Maxine Hong Kingston's depiction of head-adventurers in the Bay Area forms an unlikely parallel with Tom Hayden's experiences in the streets of Chicago in 1968. Charged with folly and tragedy, the 1960s also saw daring and unacknowledged heroism on many fronts. This volume explodes any simplification about the decade and rekindles in us a sense of wonder about our recent past.

Days of Rage

America's Radical Underground, the FBI, and the Forgotten Age of Revolutionary Violence
Author: Bryan Burrough
Publisher: Penguin Books
ISBN: 0143107976
Category: Radicalism
Page: 585
View: 8955

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The Weathermen. The Symbionese Liberation Army. The FALN. The Black Liberation Army. The names seem quaint now, but there was a stretch of time in America when there was on average more than one significant terrorist act in the U.S. every week. The FBI combated these groups and others as nodes in a single revolutionary underground, dedicated to the violent overthrow of the American government. Thus began a decade-long battle between the FBI and these homegrown terrorists, compellingly and thrillingly documented in Days of Rage.

The Portable Sixties Reader


Author: Ann Charters
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9780142001943
Category: Fiction
Page: 628
View: 1393

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Contains excerpts from essays, speeches, poetry, and fiction representative of the American counterculture of the 1960s.

Occupy Nation

The Roots, the Spirit, and the Promise of Occupy Wall Street
Author: Todd Gitlin
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062200933
Category: Political Science
Page: 320
View: 9910

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“[A] much needed book…a compelling portrait of the Occupy movement…that capture[s] the spirit of the people involved, the crisis that gave Occupy birth, and the possibility of genuine change it represents.” —Eric Foner, author of The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery The Occupy Wall Street movement arose out of a widespread desire of ordinary Americans to change a political system in which the moneyed “1%” of the nation controls the workings of the government. In Occupy Nation, social historian Todd Gitlin—a former leader of the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) who stood at the forefront of the birth of the New Left and the student protests of the 1960s and ’70s—offers a unique overview of one of the most rapidly growing yet misunderstood social revolutions in modern history. Occupy Nation is a concise and incisive look at the Occupy movement at its pivotal moment, as it weighs its unexpected power and grapples with its future mission.

1968

The Year That Rocked The World
Author: Mark Kurlansky
Publisher: Random House Incorporated
ISBN: 0345455827
Category: History
Page: 441
View: 4487

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Provides a detailed look at 1968, a pivotal year in the history of the twentieth century, exploring the turbulent events, politics, culture, economics, and social changes that marked a volatile year.

SDS.


Author: Kirkpatrick Sale
Publisher: Random House (NY)
ISBN: N.A
Category: Radicalism
Page: 752
View: 9299

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The Incredible '60s

The Stormy Years That Changed America
Author: Jules Archer
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.
ISBN: 1632207664
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 288
View: 4773

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We often remember the 1960s as a time of peace and love, but it was also a time of assassinations, riots, and an unpopular war. Furthermore, more than three million people took to the streets in violent antiwar and civil rights demonstrations during this decade. In The Incredible '60s, renowned historian Jules Archer brings the glories and tragedies of the sixties to a new generation, with a comprehensive history of sixties counterculture, the Vietnam War and the resistance movement, civil rights, feminism, science, rock ’n’ roll, and more. Covering everything from the Kennedy Era and the Freedom Riders to nuclear weapons and the Cold War, Archer aims to make sure important history is not forgotten, and this is a story for young people—a story about seeing what needs to be changed in the world and making that change happen. Jules Archer traveled to distant parts of the globe in search of information, sometimes going back to original sources. For this book he had dinner with Elvis Presley, had tea with two Australian prime ministers, climbed a volcano via camel, and swum the Seine in Paris at midnight. His adventurous spirit and enthusiasm will be contagious to young readers who may just leave their own indelible mark on a future decade. Sky Pony Press is pleased to add this important and thought-provoking piece of historical literature to its new Jules Archer History for Young Readers series.

The Sixties

From Memory to History
Author: David Farber
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469608731
Category: History
Page: 342
View: 7971

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This collection of original essays represents some of the most exciting ways in which historians are beginning to paint the 1960s onto the larger canvas of American history. While the first literature about this turbulent period was written largely by participants, many of the contributors to this volume are young scholars who came of age intellectually in the 1970s and 1980s and thus write from fresh perspectives. The essayists ask fundamental questions about how much America really changed in the 1960s and why certain changes took place. In separate chapters, they explore how the great issues of the decade--the war in Vietnam, race relations, youth culture, the status of women, the public role of private enterprise--were shaped by evolutions in the nature of cultural authority and political legitimacy. They argue that the whirlwind of events and problems we call the Sixties can only be understood in the context of the larger history of post-World War II America. Contents "Growth Liberalism in the Sixties: Great Societies at Home and Grand Designs Abroad," by Robert M. Collins "The American State and the Vietnam War: A Genealogy of Power," by Mary Sheila McMahon "And That's the Way It Was: The Vietnam War on the Network Nightly News," by Chester J. Pach, Jr. "Race, Ethnicity, and the Evolution of Political Legitimacy," by David R. Colburn and George E. Pozzetta "Nothing Distant about It: Women's Liberation and Sixties Radicalism," by Alice Echols "The New American Revolution: The Movement and Business," by Terry H. Anderson "Who'll Stop the Rain?: Youth Culture, Rock 'n' Roll, and Social Crises," by George Lipsitz "Sexual Revolution(s)," by Beth Bailey "The Politics of Civility," by Kenneth Cmiel "The Silent Majority and Talk about Revolution," by David Farber

The Murder of Albert Einstein


Author: Todd Gitlin
Publisher: Bantam Dell Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780553373660
Category: Fiction
Page: 345
View: 9434

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A glitzy TV news anchor gets involved in a search for Albert Einstein's killer after her mentor, a cult novelist and connoisseur of conspiracy, tips her off to the alleged crime that occured forty years earlier

Letters to a Young Activist


Author: Todd Gitlin
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0786749946
Category: Political Science
Page: 216
View: 9601

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"Be original. See what happens." So Todd Gitlin advises the young mind burning to take action to right the wrongs of the world but also looking for bearings, understanding, direction, and practical examples.In Letters to a Young Activist, Todd Gitlin looks back at his eventful life, recalling his experience as president of the formidable Students for a Democratic Society in the '60s, contemplating the spirit of activism, and arriving at some principles of action to guide the passion and energy of those wishing to do good. He considers the three complementary motives of duty, love, and adventure, and reflects on the changing nature of idealism and how righteous action requires realistic as well as idealistic thinking. And he looks forward to an uncertain future that is nevertheless full of possibility, a future where patriotism and intelligent skepticism are not mutually exclusive.Gitlin invites the young activist to enter imaginatively into some of the dilemmas, moral and practical, of being a modern citizen--the dilemmas that affect not only the problems of what to think but also the problems of what to love and how to live.

The Intellectuals and the Flag

Reclaiming the American Liberal Tradition
Author: Todd Gitlin
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231510357
Category: History
Page: 192
View: 9354

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In these wide-ranging essays, Todd Gitlin calls upon intellectuals on the left to once again engage American public life and resist the trappings of knee-jerk negativism, intellectual fads, and political orthodoxy. He argues for a renewed sense of patriotism based on the ideals of shared sacrifice, tough-minded criticism, and a willingness to look anew at the global role of the United States after 9/11. Gitlin's blunt, frank analysis of the current state of the left and his willingness to challenge orthodoxies pave the way for a revival in leftist thought and a new liberal patriotism.

The Age of Great Dreams

America in the 1960s
Author: David Farber
Publisher: Hill and Wang
ISBN: 9781429931267
Category: History
Page: 304
View: 5970

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In this book, David Farber grounds our understanding of the extraordinary history of the 1960s by linking the events of that era to our country's grand projects of previous decades. Farber's important study, based on years of research in archives and oral histories as well as in historical literature, explores Vietnam, the Civil Rights Act, the War on Poverty, the entertainment business, the drug culture, and much more.

The debate over Vietnam


Author: David W. Levy
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 229
View: 8607

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"Levy's prose is eminently readable, his focus always clear, the connections between major points always apparent, and his tempo just right." -- American Studies International

Berkeley at War : The 1960s

The 1960s
Author: W.J. Rorabaugh Professor of History University of Washington
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0198022522
Category: History
Page: 328
View: 6499

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Berkeley, California, was the bellwether of the political, social, and cultural upheaval that made the 1960s a unique period of American history--a time when the top-down methods of a conservative establishment collided head-on with the bottom-up, grass-roots ethos of the civil rights movement and an increasingly well-educated and individualistic middle class. W.J. Rorabaugh, who attended the graduate school of the University of California at Berkeley in the early 1970s, presents a lively and informative account of the events that overtook and changed forever what had once been a quiet, conservative white suburb. The rise of the Free Speech Movement, which gave a voice to disfranchised students; the growth and increasing militance of a black community struggling to end segregation; the emergence of radicalism and the anti-war movement; the blossoming of "hippie" culture, with its scorn for materialism and enthusiasm for experimentation with everything from sex and drugs to Eastern philosophies; the beginnings of modern-day feminism and environmentalism--and how all of these coalesced in the explosive conflict over People's Park--are traced in a meticulously researched and authoritative narrative. At issue was the question of power, and the struggle between the establishment and the powerless led to developments that the advocates of a freer society could scarcely have foreseen: Ronald Reagan, elected governor of California in reaction to the events at Berkeley, and Edwin H. Meese III, who battled against the student movement and People's Park, rose to national power in the 1980s (without, however, gaining any popularity in Berkeley, where Walter Mondale won 83 percent of the vote in 1984). An invaluable account of its time and place, this book anchors the '60s in American history, both before and since that colorful decade.

The Twilight of Common Dreams

Why America Is Wracked by Culture Wars
Author: Todd Gitlin
Publisher: Holt Paperbacks
ISBN: 9780805040913
Category: Social Science
Page: 288
View: 2940

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A New York Times Book Review Notable Book of 1995

Witness to the Revolution

Radicals, Resisters, Vets, Hippies, and the Year America Lost Its Mind and Found Its Soul
Author: Clara Bingham
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 0679644741
Category: History
Page: 656
View: 3473

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The electrifying story of the turbulent year when the sixties ended and America teetered on the edge of revolution NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH As the 1960s drew to a close, the United States was coming apart at the seams. From August 1969 to August 1970, the nation witnessed nine thousand protests and eighty-four acts of arson or bombings at schools across the country. It was the year of the My Lai massacre investigation, the Cambodia invasion, Woodstock, and the Moratorium to End the War. The American death toll in Vietnam was approaching fifty thousand, and the ascendant counterculture was challenging nearly every aspect of American society. Witness to the Revolution, Clara Bingham’s unique oral history of that tumultuous time, unveils anew that moment when America careened to the brink of a civil war at home, as it fought a long, futile war abroad. Woven together from one hundred original interviews, Witness to the Revolution provides a firsthand narrative of that period of upheaval in the words of those closest to the action—the activists, organizers, radicals, and resisters who manned the barricades of what Students for a Democratic Society leader Tom Hayden called “the Great Refusal.” We meet Bill Ayers and Bernardine Dohrn of the Weather Underground; Daniel Ellsberg, the former Defense Department employee who released the Pentagon Papers; feminist theorist Robin Morgan; actor and activist Jane Fonda; and many others whose powerful personal stories capture the essence of an era. We witness how the killing of four students at Kent State turned a straitlaced social worker into a hippie, how the civil rights movement gave birth to the women’s movement, and how opposition to the war in Vietnam turned college students into prisoners, veterans into peace marchers, and intellectuals into bombers. With lessons that can be applied to our time, Witness to the Revolution is more than just a record of the death throes of the Age of Aquarius. Today, when America is once again enmeshed in racial turmoil, extended wars overseas, and distrust of the government, the insights contained in this book are more relevant than ever. Praise for Witness to the Revolution “Especially for younger generations who didn’t live through it, Witness to the Revolution is a valuable and entertaining primer on a moment in American history the likes of which we may never see again.”—Bryan Burrough, The Wall Street Journal “A gripping oral history of the centrifugal social forces tearing America apart at the end of the ’60s . . . This is rousing reportage from the front lines of US history.”—O: The Oprah Magazine “The familiar voices and the unfamiliar ones are woven together with documents to make this a surprisingly powerful and moving book.”—New York Times Book Review “[An] Enthralling and brilliant chronology of the period between August 1969 and September 1970.”—Buffalo News “[Bingham] captures the essence of these fourteen months through the words of movement organizers, vets, students, draft resisters, journalists, musicians, government agents, writers, and others. . . . This oral history will enable readers to see that era in a new light and with fresh sympathy for the motivations of those involved. While Bingham’s is one of many retrospective looks at that period, it is one of the most immediate and personal.”—Booklist

Daughters of Aquarius

Women of the Sixties Counterculture
Author: Gretchen Lemke-Santangelo
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 234
View: 8955

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Explores how gender was percieved within the counterculture of the 1960s, and the lives of the women who lived within the world of "free love."

The Columbia Guide to America in the 1960s


Author: David Farber,Beth Bailey
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231518072
Category: History
Page: 528
View: 1666

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The 1960s continue to be the subject of passionate debate and political controversy, a touchstone in struggles over the meaning of the American past and the direction of the American future. Amid the polemics and the myths, making sense of the Sixties and its legacies presents a challenge. This book is for all those who want to take it on. Because there are so many facets to this unique and transformative era, this volume offers multiple approaches and perspectives. The first section gives a lively narrative overview of the decade's major policies, events, and cultural changes. The second presents ten original interpretative essays from prominent historians about significant and controversial issues from the Vietnam War to the sexual revolution, followed by a concise encyclopedia articles organized alphabetically. This section could stand as a reference work in itself and serves to supplement the narrative. Subsequent sections include short topical essays, special subjects, a brief chronology, and finally an extensive annotated bibliography with ample information on books, films, and electronic resources for further exploration. With interesting facts, statistics, and comparisons presented in almanac style as well as the expertise of prominent scholars, The Columbia Guide to America in the 1960s is the most complete guide to an enduringly fascinating era.