The Sixties

Years of Hope, Days of Rage
Author: Todd Gitlin
Publisher: Bantam
ISBN: 0307834026
Category: History
Page: 544
View: 9415

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Say "the Sixties" and the images start coming, images of a time when all authority was defied and millions of young Americans thought they could change the world--either through music, drugs, and universal love or by "putting their bodies on the line" against injustice and war. Todd Gitlin, the highly regarded writer, media critic, and professor of sociology at the University of California, Berkeley, has written an authoritative and compelling account of this supercharged decade--a decade he helped shape as an early president of Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) and an organizer of the first national demonstration against the Vietnam war. Part critical history, part personal memoir, part celebration, and part meditation, this critically acclaimed work resurrects a generation on all its glory and tragedy.

The Sixties

Years of Hope, Days of Rage
Author: Todd Gitlin
Publisher: Bantam
ISBN: 0553372122
Category: History
Page: 513
View: 6928

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The author, a student activist during the sixties, offers a personal perspective on the social and political changes of that decade

The Sixties


Author: Peter Stine
Publisher: Wayne State University Press
ISBN: 9780814325582
Category: Literary Collections
Page: 284
View: 4263

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The Sixties is a powerful literary anthology written by women and men who witnessed and participated in that revolutionary decade in U.S. history. Their essays, fiction, and poetry capture the complexity of events, providing personal, reflective, and diverse testimony on a decade driven by an obsessive will to change. John Lewis's experiences with SNCC or Rosellen Brown's at Tougaloo College are moral light years removed from P.J. O'Rourke's hilarious encounter with the Balto Cong in Baltimore. It requires mind expansion to imagine Peter Najarian's first exposure to the counterculture in San Francisco as contemporaneous with Richard Currey's initiation into killing in Vietnam. Maxine Hong Kingston's depiction of head-adventurers in the Bay Area forms an unlikely parallel with Tom Hayden's experiences in the streets of Chicago in 1968. Charged with folly and tragedy, the 1960s also saw daring and unacknowledged heroism on many fronts. This volume explodes any simplification about the decade and rekindles in us a sense of wonder about our recent past.

The Portable Sixties Reader


Author: Ann Charters
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9780142001943
Category: Fiction
Page: 628
View: 4151

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Contains excerpts from essays, speeches, poetry, and fiction representative of the American counterculture of the 1960s.

Occupy Nation

The Roots, the Spirit, and the Promise of Occupy Wall Street
Author: Todd Gitlin
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062200933
Category: Political Science
Page: 320
View: 4711

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“[A] much needed book…a compelling portrait of the Occupy movement…that capture[s] the spirit of the people involved, the crisis that gave Occupy birth, and the possibility of genuine change it represents.” —Eric Foner, author of The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery The Occupy Wall Street movement arose out of a widespread desire of ordinary Americans to change a political system in which the moneyed “1%” of the nation controls the workings of the government. In Occupy Nation, social historian Todd Gitlin—a former leader of the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) who stood at the forefront of the birth of the New Left and the student protests of the 1960s and ’70s—offers a unique overview of one of the most rapidly growing yet misunderstood social revolutions in modern history. Occupy Nation is a concise and incisive look at the Occupy movement at its pivotal moment, as it weighs its unexpected power and grapples with its future mission.

1968

The Year That Rocked The World
Author: Mark Kurlansky
Publisher: Random House Incorporated
ISBN: 0345455827
Category: History
Page: 441
View: 3313

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Provides a detailed look at 1968, a pivotal year in the history of the twentieth century, exploring the turbulent events, politics, culture, economics, and social changes that marked a volatile year.

At Berkeley in the Sixties

The Education of an Activist, 1961-1965
Author: Jo Freeman
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 9780253216229
Category: History
Page: 358
View: 5481

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This book is a memoir and a history of Berkeley in the early Sixties. As a young undergraduate, Jo Freeman was a key participant in the growth of social activism at the University of California, Berkeley. The story is told with the "you are there" immediacy of Freeman the undergraduate but is put into historical and political context by Freeman the scholar, 35 years later. It draws heavily on documents created at the time—letters, reports, interviews, memos, newspaper stories, FBI files—but is fleshed out with retrospective analysis. As events unfold, the campus conflicts of the Sixties take on a completely different cast, one that may surprise many readers.

The Murder of Albert Einstein


Author: Todd Gitlin
Publisher: Bantam Dell Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780553373660
Category: Fiction
Page: 345
View: 1358

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A glitzy TV news anchor gets involved in a search for Albert Einstein's killer after her mentor, a cult novelist and connoisseur of conspiracy, tips her off to the alleged crime that occured forty years earlier

Imagine Nation

The American Counterculture of the 1960's and 70's
Author: Peter Braunstein,Michael William Doyle
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136058907
Category: History
Page: 408
View: 9173

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Amidst the recent flourishing of Sixties scholarship, Imagine Nation is the first collection to focus solely on the counterculture. Its fourteen provocative essays seek to unearth the complexity and rediscover the society-changing power of significant movements and figures.

The Intellectuals and the Flag


Author: Todd Gitlin
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231124928
Category: Political Science
Page: 167
View: 1903

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In these wide-ranging essays, Todd Gitlin calls upon intellectuals on the left to once again engage American public life and resist the trappings of knee-jerk negativism, intellectual fads, and political orthodoxy. He argues for a renewed sense of patriotism based on the ideals of shared sacrifice, tough-minded criticism, and a willingness to look anew at the global role of the United States after 9/11. Gitlin's blunt, frank analysis of the current state of the left and his willingness to challenge orthodoxies pave the way for a revival in leftist thought and a new liberal patriotism.

The Sixties


Author: Terry H. Anderson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351689711
Category: History
Page: 244
View: 8642

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The Sixties is a stimulating account of a turbulent age in America. Terry Anderson examines why the nation experienced a full decade of tumult and change, and he explores why most Americans felt social, political and cultural changes were not only necessary but mandatory in the 1960s. The book examines the dramatic era chronologically and thematically and demonstrates that what made the era so unique were the various social "movements" that eventually merged with the counterculture to form a "sixties culture," the legacies of which are still felt today. The new edition has added more material on women and the GLBTQ community, as well as on Hispanic or Latino/a community, the fastest-growing minority in the United States.

Gates of Eden

American Culture in the Sixties
Author: Morris Dickstein
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 301
View: 5996

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During the sixties, says Morris Dickstein, America seemed to be at the gates of Eden--verging on a new way of experiencing life, art, and culture. In this provocative book, he discusses how we reached the gates and why, in the end, they remained closed. Beginning with Allen Ginsberg and the Beat poets of the late fifties, Dickstein traces the rise of a new sensibility in American thought, writing, and music through lively and incisive analyses of such sixties icons as Kurt Vonnegut, Jr., Bob Dylan, Norman Mailer, Ralph Ellison, Joseph Heller, Paul Goodman, Norman O. Brown, and the Rolling Stones. Now, on the twentieth anniversary of the book's original publication, Dickstein has written a new introduction, reassessing the period's achievements and failures, and providing a fresh perspective on the ways that the sixties continue to influence our politics and culture.

Days of Rage

America's Radical Underground, the FBI, and the Forgotten Age of Revolutionary Violence
Author: Bryan Burrough
Publisher: Penguin Books
ISBN: 0143107976
Category: Radicalism
Page: 585
View: 8550

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The Weathermen. The Symbionese Liberation Army. The FALN. The Black Liberation Army. The names seem quaint now, but there was a stretch of time in America when there was on average more than one significant terrorist act in the U.S. every week. The FBI combated these groups and others as nodes in a single revolutionary underground, dedicated to the violent overthrow of the American government. Thus began a decade-long battle between the FBI and these homegrown terrorists, compellingly and thrillingly documented in Days of Rage.

The Age of Great Dreams

America in the 1960s
Author: David Farber
Publisher: Hill and Wang
ISBN: 9781429931267
Category: History
Page: 304
View: 6910

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In this book, David Farber grounds our understanding of the extraordinary history of the 1960s by linking the events of that era to our country's grand projects of previous decades. Farber's important study, based on years of research in archives and oral histories as well as in historical literature, explores Vietnam, the Civil Rights Act, the War on Poverty, the entertainment business, the drug culture, and much more.

Media Unlimited, Revised Edition

How the Torrent of Images and Sounds Overwhelms Our Lives
Author: Todd Gitlin
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780805086898
Category: Social Science
Page: 264
View: 4820

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A thought-provoking but balanced examination of our media-dominated world reveals the vast array of manufactured images and sounds that have defined our civilization, from video games to elevator music, action movies to reality shows, and punditry to Internet exhibitionists. Reissue. 25,000 first printing.

Variations on a Theme Park

The New American City and the End of Public Space
Author: Michael Sorkin
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9780374523145
Category: Architecture
Page: 252
View: 3414

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Discusses the "artificial city" of megamalls, corporate enclaves, gentrified downtowns, and pseudo-historic marketplaces that are rising up around the United States

Revolution in the Air

Sixties Radicals Turn to Lenin, Mao and Che
Author: Max Elbaum
Publisher: Verso Books
ISBN: 1786634589
Category: History
Page: 416
View: 4800

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Revolution in the Air is the definitive study of how radicals from the sixties movements embraced twentieth-century Marxism, and what movements of dissent today can learn from the legacies of Lenin, Mao and Che.

The Columbia Guide to America in the 1960s


Author: David Farber,Beth Bailey
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231518072
Category: History
Page: 528
View: 659

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The 1960s continue to be the subject of passionate debate and political controversy, a touchstone in struggles over the meaning of the American past and the direction of the American future. Amid the polemics and the myths, making sense of the Sixties and its legacies presents a challenge. This book is for all those who want to take it on. Because there are so many facets to this unique and transformative era, this volume offers multiple approaches and perspectives. The first section gives a lively narrative overview of the decade's major policies, events, and cultural changes. The second presents ten original interpretative essays from prominent historians about significant and controversial issues from the Vietnam War to the sexual revolution, followed by a concise encyclopedia articles organized alphabetically. This section could stand as a reference work in itself and serves to supplement the narrative. Subsequent sections include short topical essays, special subjects, a brief chronology, and finally an extensive annotated bibliography with ample information on books, films, and electronic resources for further exploration. With interesting facts, statistics, and comparisons presented in almanac style as well as the expertise of prominent scholars, The Columbia Guide to America in the 1960s is the most complete guide to an enduringly fascinating era.