The Rights of Indians and Tribes


Author: Stephen Pevar
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199795355
Category: LAW
Page: 522
View: 9764

Continue Reading →

"Federal Indian Law encompasses nearly 400 Indian treaties, hundreds of federal statutes, and thousands of court decisions. When the first edition of The Rights of Indians and Tribes was published in 1983, it firmly established itself as the only book explaining Federal Indian Law in a clear and easy-to-understand way for students and practitioners of Indian law, tribal advocates, government officials, and the general public. Numerous tribal leaders highly recommend this book. Incorporating a user-friendly question-and-answer format, veteran legal counsel Stephen Pevar addresses the most significant legal issues facing Indians and Indian tribes, including tribal sovereignty, the federal trust responsibility, the regulation of non-Indians on reservations, Indian treaties, the Indian Civil Rights Act, the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act, and the Indian Child Welfare Act. This fully updated new edition includes a wealth of new information on recent legislation and judicial decisions, and it also features an introduction by John Echohawk, Executive Director of the Native American Rights Fund"--

The Rights of Indians and Tribes

The Authoritative ACLU Guide to Indian and Tribal Rights, Third Edition
Author: Stephen L. Pevar
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 0814767184
Category: Law
Page: 421
View: 8437

Continue Reading →

This informative guide thoroughly discusses the powers of Indian tribes; civil and criminal jurisdiction on Indian reservations; Indian hunting, fishing, and water rights; taxation in Indian country; the Indian Civil Rights Act; the Indian Child Welfare Act; and tribal jurisdiction over non-Indians.

The Rights of American Indians and Their Tribes


Author: Stephen L. Pevar
Publisher: Puffin
ISBN: 9780140377835
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 225
View: 3466

Continue Reading →

A history of Federal Indian policy precedes discussion of topics related to the legal rights of American Indians, including treaties; tribal self-government; hunting, fishing, and gathering rights; civil rights; and criminal jurisdiction in Indian country.

American Indian Treaties

The History of a Political Anomaly
Author: Francis Paul Prucha
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520919167
Category: History
Page: 562
View: 7008

Continue Reading →

American Indian affairs are much in the public mind today—hotly contested debates over such issues as Indian fishing rights, land claims, and reservation gambling hold our attention. While the unique legal status of American Indians rests on the historical treaty relationship between Indian tribes and the federal government, until now there has been no comprehensive history of these treaties and their role in American life. Francis Paul Prucha, a leading authority on the history of American Indian affairs, argues that the treaties were a political anomaly from the very beginning. The term "treaty" implies a contract between sovereign independent nations, yet Indians were always in a position of inequality and dependence as negotiators, a fact that complicates their current attempts to regain their rights and tribal sovereignty. Prucha's impeccably researched book, based on a close analysis of every treaty, makes possible a thorough understanding of a legal dilemma whose legacy is so palpably felt today.

Recognition, Sovereignty Struggles, and Indigenous Rights in the United States

A Sourcebook
Author: Amy E. Den Ouden,Jean M. O'Brien
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469602172
Category: Social Science
Page: 376
View: 4333

Continue Reading →

This engaging collection surveys and clarifies the complex issue of federal and state recognition for Native American tribal nations in the United States. Den Ouden and O'Brien gather focused and teachable essays on key topics, debates, and case studies. Written by leading scholars in the field, including historians, anthropologists, legal scholars, and political scientists, the essays cover the history of recognition, focus on recent legal and cultural processes, and examine contemporary recognition struggles nationwide. Contributors are Joanne Barker (Lenape), Kathleen A. Brown-Perez (Brothertown), Rosemary Cambra (Muwekma Ohlone), Amy E. Den Ouden, Timothy Q. Evans (Haliwa-Saponi), Les W. Field, Angela A. Gonzales (Hopi), Rae Gould (Nipmuc), J. Kehaulani Kauanui (Kanaka Maoli), K. Alexa Koenig, Alan Leventhal, Malinda Maynor Lowery (Lumbee), Jean M. O'Brien (White Earth Ojibwe), John Robinson, Jonathan Stein, Ruth Garby Torres (Schaghticoke), and David E. Wilkins (Lumbee).

Tribe

Das verlorene Wissen um Gemeinschaft und Menschlichkeit
Author: Sebastian Junger
Publisher: Karl Blessing Verlag
ISBN: 3641203619
Category: Social Science
Page: 192
View: 4305

Continue Reading →

Unser Trauma: eine Gesellschaft ohne Gemeinschaft. »Entbehrungen machen dem Menschen nichts aus, er ist sogar auf sie angewiesen; worunter er jedoch leidet, ist das Gefühl, nicht gebraucht zu werden. Die moderne Gesellschaft hat die Kunst perfektioniert, Menschen das Gefühl der Nutzlosigkeit zu geben. Es ist an der Zeit, dem ein Ende zu setzen.« Sebastian Junger Warum beschließen Soldaten nach ihrer Rückkehr aus dem Krieg und in die Heimat, sich zu neuen Einsätzen zu melden? Warum sind Belastungsstörungen und Depressionen in unserer modernen Gesellschaft so virulent? Warum erinnern sich Menschen oft sehnsüchtiger an Katastrophenerfahrungen als an Hochzeiten oder Karibikurlaube? Mit Tribe hat Sebastian Junger eines der meistdiskutierten Werke des Jahres vorgelegt. Er erklärt, was wir von Stammeskulturen über Loyalität, Gemeinschaftsgefühl und die ewige Suche des Menschen nach Sinn lernen können.

Readings in American Indian Law

Recalling the Rhythm of Survival
Author: Jo Carrillo
Publisher: Temple University Press
ISBN: 9781566395823
Category: History
Page: 353
View: 8598

Continue Reading →

This collection of works many by Native American scholars introduces selected topics in federal Indian law. Readings in American Indian Law covers contemporary issues of identity and tribal recognition; reparations for historic harms; the valuation of land in land claims; the return to tribal owners of human remains, sacred items, and cultural property; tribal governance and issues of gender, democracy informed by cultural awareness, and religious freedom. Courses in federal Indian law are often aimed at understanding rules, not cultural conflicts. This book expands doctrinal discussions into understandings of culture, strategy, history, identity, and hopes for the future. Contributions from law, history, anthropology, ethnohistory, biography, sociology, socio-legal studies, and fiction offer an array of alternative paradigms as strong antidotes to our usual conceptions of federal Indian law. Each selection reveals an aspect of how federal Indian law is made, interpreted, implemented, or experienced. Throughout, the book centers on the ever present and contentious issue of identity. At the point where identity and law intersect lies an important new way to contextualize the legal concerns of Native Americans. Author note: Jo Carrillo is Visiting Professor of Law at Stanford Law School, where she is on leave from the University of California, Hastings College of Law.

Protest Nation

Words That Inspired A Century of American Radicalism
Author: Timothy McCarthy,John McMillian
Publisher: The New Press
ISBN: 1595586067
Category: History
Page: 240
View: 2906

Continue Reading →

Protest Nation is a guide through the speeches, letters, broadsides, essays, and manifestos that form the backbone of the American radical tradition in the twentieth century. With examples from socialists, feminists, union organizers, civil-rights workers, gay and lesbian activists, and environmentalists that have served as beacons for millions, the volume also includes brief introductory essays by the editors that provide a rich biographical and historical context for each selection included. Selections include a fiery speech by socialist Eugene Debs, an astonishing treatise on animal liberation by Peter Singer, "Silent Spring" by Rachel Carson, Harvey Milk's "The Hope Speech" and many others. Brief introductory essays by the editors provide a rich biographical and historical context for each selection included. Protest Nation presents the most significant and brilliant examples of radical writing, in a concise volume geared for anyone interested in reconnecting with the deep currents of American radical thinking. These range from a fiery speech by Eugene Debs, the great socialist orator; to the original Black Panther Party Platform; to Peter Singer’s astonishing treatise on animal liberation, among many others.

American Indians

Answers to Today's Questions
Author: Jack Utter
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 9780806133096
Category: History
Page: 494
View: 3521

Continue Reading →

Answer to today's questions.

American Indian Tribal Governments


Author: Sharon O'Brien
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 9780806125640
Category: Social Science
Page: 368
View: 4706

Continue Reading →

This book describes the struggle of Indian tribes and their governments to achieve freedom and self-determination despite repeated attempts by foreign governments to dominate, exterminate, or assimilate them. Drawing on the disciplines of political science, history, law, and anthropology and written in a direct, readable style, American Indian Tribal Governments is a comprehensive introduction to traditional tribal governments, to the history of Indian-white relations, to the structure and legal rights of modern tribal governments, and to the changing roles of federal and state governments in relation to modem tribal governments. Publication of this book fills a gap in American Indian studies, providing scholars with a basis from which to begin an integrated study of tribal government, providing teachers with an excellent introductory textbook, and providing general readers with an accessible and complete introduction to American Indian history and government. The book's unique structure allows coverage of a great breadth of information while avoiding the common mistake of generalizing about all tribes and cultures. An introductory section presents the basic themes of the book and describes the traditional governments of five tribes chosen for their geographic and cultural diversity-the Senecas, the Muscogees, the Lakotas, the Isleta Pueblo, and the Yakimas. The next three chapters review the history of Indian-white relations from the time Christopher Columbus "discovered" America to the present. Then the history and modem government of each of the five tribes presented earlier is examined in detail. The final chapters analyze the evolution and current legal powers of tribal governments, the tribal-federal relationship, and the tribal-state relationship. American Indian Tribal Governments illuminates issues of tribal sovereignty and shows how tribes are protecting and expanding their control of tribal membership, legal systems, child welfare, land and resource use, hunting and fishing, business regulation, education, and social services. Other examples show tribes negotiating with state and federal governments to alleviate sources of conflict, including issues of criminal and civil jurisdiction, taxation, hunting and fishing rights, and control of natural resources. Excerpts from historical and modem documents and speeches highlight the text, and more than one hundred photos, maps, and charts show tribal life, government, and interaction with white society as it was and is. Included as well are a glossary and a chronology of important events.

The Color of Wealth

The Story Behind the U.S. Racial Wealth Divide
Author: Barbara Robles,Betsy Leondar-Wright,Rose Brewer
Publisher: The New Press
ISBN: 1595585621
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 336
View: 3860

Continue Reading →

For every dollar owned by the average white family in the United States, the average family of color has less than a dime. Why do people of color have so little wealth? The Color of Wealth lays bare a dirty secret: for centuries, people of color have been barred by laws and by discrimination from participating in government wealth-building programs that benefit white Americans. This accessible book—published in conjunction with one of the country’s leading economics education organizations—makes the case that until government policy tackles disparities in wealth, not just income, the United States will never have racial or economic justice. Written by five leading experts on the racial wealth divide who recount the asset-building histories of Native Americans, Latinos, African Americans, Asian Americans, and European Americans, this book is a uniquely comprehensive multicultural history of American wealth. With its focus on public policies—how, for example, many post–World War II GI Bill programs helped whites only—The Color of Wealth is the first book to demonstrate the decisive influence of government on Americans’ net worth.

Documents of United States Indian Policy


Author: Francis Paul Prucha
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803287624
Category: Law
Page: 396
View: 8906

Continue Reading →

The third edition of this landmark work adds forty new documents, which cover the significant developments in American Indian affairs since 1988. Among the topics dealt with are tribal self-governance, government-to-government relations, religious rights, repatriation of human remains, trust management, health and education, federal recognition of tribes, presidential policies, and Alaska Natives.

Indian Tribes of Oklahoma

A Guide
Author: Blue Clark
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806184639
Category: Social Science
Page: 416
View: 1644

Continue Reading →

Oklahoma is home to nearly forty American Indian tribes, and includes the largest Native population of any state. As a result, many Americans think of the state as “Indian Country.” For more than half a century readers have turned to Muriel H. Wright’s A Guide to the Indian Tribes of Oklahoma as the authoritative source for information on the state’s Native peoples. Now Blue Clark, an enrolled member of the Muscogee (Creek) Nation, has rendered a completely new guide that reflects the drastic transformation of Indian Country in recent years. As a synthesis of current knowledge, this book places the state’s Indians in their contemporary context as no other book has done. Solidly grounded in scholarship and Native oral tradition, it provides general readers the unique story of each tribe, from the Alabama-Quassartes to the Yuchis. Each entry contains a complete statistical and narrative summary of the tribe, encompassing everything from origin tales and archaeological research to contemporary ceremonies and tribal businesses. The entries also include tribal websites and suggested readings, along with photographs depicting prominent tribal personages, visitor sites, and accomplishments.

Endangered Species Act

Law, Policy, and Perspectives
Author: Donald C. Baur,William Robert Irvin
Publisher: American Bar Association
ISBN: 9781604425802
Category: Law
Page: 435
View: 2023

Continue Reading →

"As Secretary of the Interior, implementing the Endangered Species Act was one of my most important, and challenging, responsibilities. All who deal with this complex and critical law need a clear and comprehensive guide to its provisions, interpretation, and implementation. With chapters written by some of the foremost practitioners in the field, the new edition of Endangered Species Act: Law, Policy, and Perspectives is an essential reference for conservationists and the regulated community and the attorneys who represent them."---Bruce Babbbitt, former Secretary of the Interior "In January 1973, when i introduced in Congress the bill that would become the Endangered Species Act, I described it as one of the most important pieces of legislation needed if we were to conserve, protect, and propagate our thereatened fish and our wildlife resources, which were diminishing too rapidly. I am proud to have introduced the original bill and even prouder that, in the ensuing years, the Endangered Species Act has saved hundreds of species from extinction. We have learned much along the way about the conservation of endangered species, the needs of the regulated community, and how the Endangered Species Act can successfully reconcile the two. It is important that we have a comprehensive understanding of the problems and potential of this landmark law."---John D. Dingell, U.S. House of Representatives, Michigan "Possibly the single most effective legislative effort of modern times to ensure that our children and grandchildren can enjoy the blessings of nature that were passed on to our generation was the enactment of the landmark Endangered Species Act (ESA) in 1973. The ESA has allowed the United States to make great advances in protecting the web of life that enables the intricate coexistence of man, plant, and animal. In my role as Chairman of the House Committee on Natural Resources, I recognize the role of the Endangered Species Act in helping us to fulfill our stewardship responsibilities while balancing local concerns and economic needs. Understanding how the ESA works is essential to its continued success."---Nick J. Rahall, II, U.S. House of Representatives, West Virginia "After a lifetime of studying, writing about, and being amazed by the diversity of life, I remain convinced that failing to do everything we can to protect it is the folly future generations are least likely to forgive us. The Endangered Species Act is one of the most far-sighted and important laws ever adopted. A thorough understanding of how the law works, the major policy issues surrounding it, and how to resolve those issues will ensure the law's continued success in protecting biodiversity. Endangered Species Act: Law, Policy, and Perspectives provides readers with the needed insight to this critically important law."---Edward O. Wilson, University Research Professor Emeritus at Harvard University and Honorary Curator in Entomology at the Museum of Comparative Zoology

The Indians in American Society

From the Revolutionary War to the Present
Author: Francis Paul Prucha
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520908840
Category: History
Page: 144
View: 3497

Continue Reading →

American Indian affairs are much in the public mind today—hotly contested debates over such issues as Indian fishing rights, land claims, and reservation gambling hold our attention. While the unique legal status of American Indians rests on the historical treaty relationship between Indian tribes and the federal government, until now there has been no comprehensive history of these treaties and their role in American life. Francis Paul Prucha, a leading authority on the history of American Indian affairs, argues that the treaties were a political anomaly from the very beginning. The term "treaty" implies a contract between sovereign independent nations, yet Indians were always in a position of inequality and dependence as negotiators, a fact that complicates their current attempts to regain their rights and tribal sovereignty. Prucha's impeccably researched book, based on a close analysis of every treaty, makes possible a thorough understanding of a legal dilemma whose legacy is so palpably felt today.

Cash, Color, and Colonialism

The Politics of Tribal Acknowledgment
Author: Renee Ann Cramer
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 9780806136714
Category: Political Science
Page: 234
View: 8213

Continue Reading →

Within the context of U.S.-Indian law, federal acknowledgment establishes a trust relationship between an Indian tribe and the U.S. government. Some tribes, however, have not been federally acknowledged, or, in more common language, “recognized.” In Cash, Color, and Colonialism, Reneé Ann Cramer offers a comprehensive analysis of the federal acknowledgment process, placing it in historical, legal, and social context.

Broken Landscape

Indians, Indian Tribes, and the Constitution
Author: Frank Pommersheim
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199706594
Category: Law
Page: 424
View: 2799

Continue Reading →

Broken Landscape is a sweeping chronicle of Indian tribal sovereignty under the United States Constitution and the way that legislators have interpreted and misinterpreted tribal sovereignty since the nation's founding. Frank Pommersheim, one of America's leading scholars in Indian tribal law, offers a novel and deeply researched synthesis of this legal history from colonial times to the present, confronting the failures of constitutional analysis in contemporary Indian law jurisprudence. He demonstrates that the federal government has repeatedly failed to respect the Constitution's recognition of tribal sovereignty. Instead, it has favored excessive, unaccountable authority in its dealings with tribes. Pommersheim argues that the Supreme Court has strayed from its Constitutional roots as well, consistently issuing decisions over two centuries that have bolstered federal power over the tribes. Closing with a proposal for a Constitutional amendment that would reaffirm tribal sovereignty, Broken Landscape challenges us to finally accord Indian tribes and Indian people the respect and dignity that are their due.

Native American Studies


Author: Clara Sue Kidwell
Publisher: U of Nebraska Press
ISBN: 9780803278295
Category: Social Science
Page: 160
View: 2760

Continue Reading →

Native American Studies covers key issues such as the intimate relationship of culture to land; the nature of cultural exchange and conflict in the period after European contact; the unique relationship of Native communities with the United States government; the significance of language; the vitality of contemporary cultures; and the variety of Native artistic styles, from literature and poetry to painting and sculpture to performance arts.

Encyclopedia of Nevada Indians


Author: Donald Ricky
Publisher: Somerset Publishers, Inc.
ISBN: 0403097851
Category: History
Page: 485
View: 7042

Continue Reading →

There is a great deal of information on the native peoples of the United States, which exists largely in national publications. Since much of Native American history occurred before statehood, there is a need for information on Native Americans of the region to fully understand the history and culture of the native peoples that occupied Nevada and the surrounding areas. The first section is contains an overview of early history of the state and region. The second section contains an A to Z dictionary of tribal articles and biographies of noteworthy Native Americans that have contributed to the history of Nevada. The third section contains several selections from the classic book, A Century of Dishonor, which details the history of broken promises made to the tribes throughout the country during the early history of America. The fourth section offers the publishers opinion on the government dealings with the Native Americans, in addition to a summation of government tactics that were used to achieve the suppression of the Native Americans.