The religion of China

Confucianism and Taoism
Author: Max Weber
Publisher: Free Pr
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 308
View: 5381

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Compares and contrasts the social and economic development of Chinese and Western societies and demonstrates the way in which Confucian and Taoist religious values inhibited the development of a capitalist economy in China. Bibliogs

The Religions of China

Confucianism and Tâoism Described and Compared with Christianity
Author: James Legge
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: China
Page: 308
View: 1968

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Religions of China in Practice


Author: Donald S. Lopez
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691021430
Category: Religion
Page: 499
View: 6007

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This third volume of Princeton Readings in Religions demonstrates that the "three religions" of China--Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism (with a fourth, folk religion, sometimes added)--are not mutually exclusive: they overlap and interact with each other in a rich variety of ways. The volume also illustrates some of the many interactions between Han culture and the cultures designated by the current government as "minorities." Selections from minority cultures here, for instance, are the folktale of Ny Dan the Manchu Shamaness and a funeral chant of the Yi nationality collected by local researchers in the early 1980s. Each of the forty unusual selections, from ancient oracle bones to stirring accounts of mystic visions, is preceded by a substantial introduction. As with the other volumes, most of the selections here have never been translated before. Stephen Teiser provides a general introduction in which the major themes and categories of the religions of China are analyzed. The book represents an attempt to move from one conception of the "Chinese spirit" to a picture of many spirits, including a Laozi who acquires magical powers and eventually ascends to heaven in broad daylight; the white-robed Guanyin, one of the most beloved Buddhist deities in China; and the burning-mouth hungry ghost. The book concludes with a section on "earthly conduct."

The Religions of China

Confucianism and Tâoism Described and Compared with Christianity
Author: James Legge
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: China
Page: 310
View: 9029

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Religion in China Today


Author: Daniel L. Overmyer
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521538237
Category: History
Page: 235
View: 6515

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This volume looks at Religions in China Today. Articles include: Belief in Control: Regulation of Religion in China, Local Communal Religion in Contemporary Southeast China, The Cult of the Silkworm Mother as a Core of Local Community Religion in a North China Village, Local Religion in Hong Kong and Macau, Religion and the State in Post-war Taiwan, Daoism in China Today, 1980-2002, Buddhist China at the Century's Turn, Islam in China: Accommodation or Separatism?, Catholic Revival during the Reform Era, Chinese Protestant Christianity Today, Healing Sects and Anti-Cult Campaigns.

The Religion of Falun Gong


Author: Benjamin Penny
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226655016
Category: History
Page: 262
View: 4979

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Provides the first serious examination of Falun Gong teachings and how those teachings relate to earlier Chinese religious ideas and contemporary society.

Religion in Chinese Society

A Study of Contemporary Social Functions of Religion and Some of Their Historical Factors
Author: C. K. Yang
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: N.A
Category: China
Page: 473
View: 9833

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Religions of China

The World as a Living System
Author: Daniel E. Overmyer
Publisher: Waveland Press
ISBN: 1478609893
Category: Religion
Page: 125
View: 4261

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The guiding themes of Chinese religion as it is actually lived! This short work explains basic ideas and practices of Chinese religions in direct and simple language, with many examples and analogies for increased understanding. Its basic assumption is that religion is best understood as an aspect of everyday lifeas something that makes sense to those who practice iteven if outsiders might be puzzled at first. While Overmyers treatment focuses on traditional China before the twentieth century, many of the beliefs and practices described are still alive, at least in some Chinese communities. While the basic concern of this book is, first, to understand Chinese religions in their own right, it takes the additional step of exploring what modern students might learn from them.

The Religions of China

Confucianism and Tâoism Described and Compared with Christianity
Author: James Legge
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: China
Page: 310
View: 4791

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An Introduction to the Philosophy and Religion of Taoism

Pathways to Immortality
Author: Jeaneane D. Fowler
Publisher: ISBS
ISBN: 9781845190859
Category: Philosophy
Page: 342
View: 4241

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A companion volume to the bestselling Perspectives of Reality: An Introduction to the Philosophy of Hinduism, this work discusses how Taoism is one facet of Chinese religion, and exemplifies particularly well the variety of beliefs and practices that humankind has adopted and experienced in the search for answers to both ultimate and proximate questions about life and death. This book explores the different pathways Taoism took in that search, touching at many points on the other interrelated facets of Chinese religion in Confucianism, Buddhism, and popular religion. The mystical, philosophical traditions of Taoism are analyzed, as well as the more colorful and overtly religious strands of Taoism.

The Religious Traditions of Asia

Religion, History, and Culture
Author: Joseph Mitsuo Kitagawa
Publisher: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780700717620
Category: Social Science
Page: 375
View: 7292

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This essential student textbook consists of seventeen sections, all written by leading scholars in their different fields. They cover all the religious traditions of Southwest Asia, Southeast Asia, Central Asia, Tibet, and East Asia. The major traditions that are described and discussed are (from the Southwest) Hinduism, Jainism, Buddhism, Sikhism and Islam, and (from the East) Taoism, Confucianism and Shinto. In addition, the tradition of Bon in Tibet, the shamanistic religions of Inner Asia, and general Chinese, Korean and Japanese religion are also given full coverage. The emphasis throughout is on clear description and analysis, rather than evaluation. Ten maps are provided to add to the usefulness of this book, which has its origin in the acclaimed Encyclopedia of Religion, edited by Mircea Eliade of the University of Chicago.

Of Tripod and Palate

Food, Politics, and Religion in Traditional China
Author: Roel Sterckx
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 9781403963376
Category: History
Page: 256
View: 4922

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Attitudes toward food and commensality constituted a central fiber in the social, religious, and political fabric of ancient Chinese society. The offering of sacrifices, the banqueting of guests, and the ritual preparation, prohibition or consumption of food and drink were central elements in each of China's three main religious traditions: the Classicist (Confucian) tradition, religious Daoism, and Buddhism. What links late Shang and Zhou bronze vessels to Buddhist dietary codes or Daoist recipes for immortality is a poignant testimony that culinary activity - fasting and feasting - governed not only human relationships but also fermented the communication between humans and the spirit world. In Of Tripod and Palate leading scholars examine the relationship between secular and religious food culture in ancient China from various perspectives.

Religion in China

Survival and Revival under Communist Rule
Author: Fenggang Yang
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199911045
Category: Social Science
Page: 264
View: 9100

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Religion in China survived the most radical suppression in human history--a total ban of any religion during and after the Cultural Revolution. All churches, temples, and mosques were closed down, converted for secular uses, or turned to museums for the purpose of atheist education. Over the last three decades, however, religion has survived and thrived even as China remains under Communist rule. Christianity ranks among the fastest-growing religions in the country, and many Buddhist and Daoist temples have been restored. The state even sponsors large Buddhist gatherings and ceremonies to venerate Confucius and the legendary ancestors of the Chinese people. On the other hand, quasi-religious qigong practices, once ubiquitous, are now rare. All the while, authorities have carried out waves of atheist propaganda, anti-superstition campaigns, severe crackdowns on the underground Christian churches and various ''evil cults.'' How do we explain religion in China today? How did religion survive the eradication measures in the 1960s and 1970s? How do various religious groups manage to revive despite strict regulations? Why have some religions grown fast in the reform era? Why have some forms of spirituality gone through dramatic turns? In Religion in China, Fenggang Yang provides a comprehensive overview of the religious change in China under Communism.