The Real Food of China


Author: Leanne Kitchen,Antony Suvalko
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781742705309
Category: Cooking
Page: 440
View: 657

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Through the authors' personal travels through China came realisation that what is commonly perceived as "Chinese food" in the Western world, is only part of the story, and thus followed the inspiration to celebrate the lesser known, wonderfully diverse aspects of this ancient culture's cooking. There is a growing global appreciation for regional Chinese fare- but it is mostly unrepresented in Chinese restaurants. Kitchen and Suvalko strove to capture the essence of the simple home cooking and explore the variation in cuisine among the different regions. The result is a comprehensive compendium of dishes, divided into chapters by category, including: cold dishes, soups and hotpots, dumplings, breads and noodles, pork, chicken, fish, vegetables and desserts. Readers can delight in fermented foods from Shaoxing, River fish from Jiangxi province, Smoked pork from Hunan, fish dumplings and flat breads from Shandong or bowls of fresh, steaming, soft tofu slathered in chilli and peppercorns from Sichuan villages. With food that is full of flavour, utilizes seasonal produce and is simple to prepare, and beautiful photographs shot on location, A Taste of China will challenge everything you thought you knew about Chinese cooking!

Food of China


Author: Deh-Ta Hsiung,Nina Simonds
Publisher: Allen & Unwin
ISBN: 9781740454636
Category: Cooking, Chinese
Page: 296
View: 3409

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A real taste of a country that has one of the worl

Food, Wine and China

A Tourism Perspective
Author: Christof Pforr,Ian Phau
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351742728
Category: Travel
Page: 302
View: 4815

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The growth of the Chinese economy and the emergence of the Chinese middle class have fuelled the rapid expansion of China’s outbound tourism market, with many destinations around the world trying to capitalise on the opportunities created by the growing number of Chinese visitors. This book specifically focuses on the demand for food and wine tourism experiences by Chinese tourists, which in recent years has become an important constituent of destination competitiveness. Looking at the different ways in which individual destinations have responded to this increasing demand, this book provides a better understanding of the preferences, motivations and perceptions that underlie food and wine consumption by Chinese tourists. It also illustrates how food and wine tourism experiences have been used in a range of international destinations to specifically attract visitors from China. Including a range of case examples from the Asia-Pacific region and Europe, this book ultimately investigates the strategic directions adopted to guide destination development and marketing initiatives. Such a perspective provides a novel contribution to the still limited body of knowledge on China outbound tourism and will be of interest to upper level students, researchers and academics in Tourism and Hospitality.

China to Chinatown

Chinese Food in the West
Author: J.A.G. Roberts
Publisher: Reaktion Books
ISBN: 1861896182
Category: Political Science
Page: 256
View: 7194

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China to Chinatown tells the story of one of the most notable examples of the globalization of food: the spread of Chinese recipes, ingredients and cooking styles to the Western world. Beginning with the accounts of Marco Polo and Franciscan missionaries, J.A.G. Roberts describes how Westerners’ first impressions of Chinese food were decidedly mixed, with many regarding Chinese eating habits as repugnant. Chinese food was brought back to the West merely as a curiosity. The Western encounter with a wider variety of Chinese cuisine dates from the first half of the 20th century, when Chinese food spread to the West with emigrant communities. The author shows how Chinese cooking has come to be regarded by some as among the world’s most sophisticated cuisines, and yet is harshly criticized by others, for example on the grounds that its preparation involves cruelty to animals. Roberts discusses the extent to which Chinese food, as a facet of Chinese culture overseas, has remained differentiated, and questions whether its ethnic identity is dissolving. Written in a lively style, the book will appeal to food historians and specialists in Chinese culture, as well as to readers interested in Chinese cuisine.

Food Plants of China


Author: Shiu-ying Hu
Publisher: Chinese University Press
ISBN: 9789629962296
Category: Nature
Page: 844
View: 1160

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The food plants of an area provide the material basis for the survival of its population, and furnish inspiring stimuli for cultural development. There are two parts in this book. Part 1 introduces the cultural aspects of Chinese food plants and the spread of Chinese culinary culture to the world. It also describes how the botanical and cultural information was acquired; what plants have been selected by the Chinese people for food; how these foodstuffs are produced, preserved, and prepared; and what the western societies can learn from Chinese practices. Part 2 provides the botanical identification of the plant kingdom for the esculents used in China as food and/or as beverage. The plants are illustrated with line drawings or composite photographic plates. This book is useful not only as a text for general reading, but also as a work reference. Naturally, it would be a useful addition to the general collection of any library.

Mastering the Art of Chinese Cooking


Author: Eileen Yin-Fei Lo
Publisher: Chronicle Books
ISBN: 0811878708
Category: Cooking
Page: 384
View: 6619

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This new masterwork of Chinese cuisine showcases acclaimed chef Eileen Yin-Fei Lo's decades of culinary virtuosity. A series of lessons build skill, knowledge, and confidence as Lo guides the home cook step by step through the techniques, ingredients, and equipment that define Chinese cuisine. With more than 100 classic recipes and technique illustrations throughout, Mastering the Art of Chinese Cooking makes the glories of this ancient cuisine utterly accessible. Stunning color photography reveals the treasures of old and new China, from the zigzagging alleys of historical Guangzhou to the bustle of city centers and faraway Chinatowns, as well as wonderful ingredients and gorgeous finished dishes. Step-by-step brush drawings illustrate Chinese cooking techniques. This lavish volume takes its place as the Chinese cookbook of choice in the cook's library.

Land of Fish and Rice: Recipes from the Culinary Heart of China


Author: Fuchsia Dunlop
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393254399
Category: Cooking
Page: 416
View: 5549

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2017 Nominee for James Beard Cookbook Award: International 2017 Nominee for IACP Cookbook Award: International The lower Yangtze region, or Jiangnan, with its modern capital Shanghai, has been known since ancient times as a “land of fish and rice.” For centuries, local cooks have harvested the bounty of its lakes, rivers, fields, and mountains to create a cuisine renowned for its delicacy and beauty. In Land of Fish and Rice, Fuchsia Dunlop draws on years of study and exploration to present the recipes, techniques, and ingredients of the Jiangnan kitchen. You will be inspired to try classic dishes such as Beggar’s Chicken and sumptuous Dongpo Pork, as well as fresh, simple recipes such as Clear-Steamed Sea Bass and Fresh Soybeans with Pickled Greens. Evocatively written and featuring stunning recipe photography, this is an important new work celebrating one of China’s most fascinating culinary regions. Winner, 2016 Andre Simon award (UK) Winner, 2017 Cookbook of the Year (British Guild of Food Writers)

All Under Heaven

Recipes from the 35 Cuisines of China
Author: Carolyn Phillips
Publisher: Ten Speed Press
ISBN: 1607749823
Category: Cooking, Chinese
Page: 524
View: 2891

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Vaulting from ancient taverns near the Yangtze River to banquet halls in modern Taipei, All Under Heaven is the first cookbook in English to examine all 35 cuisines of China. Drawing on centuries' worth of culinary texts, as well as her own years working, eating, and cooking in Taiwan, Carolyn Phillips has written a spirited, symphonic love letter to the flavors and textures of Chinese cuisine. With hundreds of recipes--from simple Fried Green Onion Noodles to Lotus-Wrapped Spicy Rice Crumb Pork--written with clear, step-by-step instructions, All Under Heaven serves as both a handbook for the novice and a source of inspiration for the veteran chef.

East


Author: Leanne Kitchen,Antony Suvalko
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781742709161
Category: Cooking
Page: 272
View: 2886

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East celebrates the ingredients and flavors of South East Asia, taking you on a unique journey from the comfort of your own kitchen. Inspired by the authors' personal travels and the culinary highlights they discovered in Cambodia, Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia, Laos, Indonesia and Burma, East is a colorful exploration of the food and culture of these diverse areas. Captured with stunning photography from locations throughout South East Asia as well as beautiful food photography to accompany the recipes, East reveals a glimpse of the bold tastes, big colors and full flavors of this exotic region.

The Food of China


Author: E. N. Anderson
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300047394
Category: Cooking
Page: 313
View: 3226

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Looks at the role of food in Chinese government policy, religious rituals, and health practices, traces the evolution of Chinese cuisine, and discusses the absence of food taboos

The China Study: Revised and Expanded Edition

The Most Comprehensive Study of Nutrition Ever Conducted and the Startling Implications for Diet, Weight Loss, and Long-Term Health
Author: T. Colin Campbell,Thomas M. Campbell II
Publisher: BenBella Books, Inc.
ISBN: 1942952902
Category: Health & Fitness
Page: 496
View: 8382

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The revised and expanded edition of the bestseller that changed millions of lives The science is clear. The results are unmistakable. You can dramatically reduce your risk of cancer, heart disease, and diabetes just by changing your diet. More than 30 years ago, nutrition researcher T. Colin Campbell and his team at Cornell, in partnership with teams in China and England, embarked upon the China Study, the most comprehensive study ever undertaken of the relationship between diet and the risk of developing disease. What they found when combined with findings in Colin’s laboratory, opened their eyes to the dangers of a diet high in animal protein and the unparalleled health benefits of a whole foods, plant-based diet. In 2005, Colin and his son Tom, now a physician, shared those findings with the world in The China Study, hailed as one of the most important books about diet and health ever written. Featuring brand new content, this heavily expanded edition of Colin and Tom’s groundbreaking book includes the latest undeniable evidence of the power of a plant-based diet, plus updated information about the changing medical system and how patients stand to benefit from a surging interest in plant-based nutrition. The China Study—Revised and Expanded Edition presents a clear and concise message of hope as it dispels a multitude of health myths and misinformation. The basic message is clear. The key to a long, healthy life lies in three things: breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

The Fortune Cookie Chronicles

Adventures in the World of Chinese Food
Author: Jennifer B. Lee
Publisher: Twelve
ISBN: 0446511706
Category: Social Science
Page: 320
View: 5841

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If you think McDonald's is the most ubiquitous restaurant experience in America, consider that there are more Chinese restaurants in America than McDonalds, Burger Kings, and Wendys combined. New York Times reporter and Chinese-American (or American-born Chinese). In her search, Jennifer 8 Lee traces the history of Chinese-American experience through the lens of the food. In a compelling blend of sociology and history, Jenny Lee exposes the indentured servitude Chinese restaurants expect from illegal immigrant chefs, investigates the relationship between Jews and Chinese food, and weaves a personal narrative about her own relationship with Chinese food. The Fortune Cookie Chronicles speaks to the immigrant experience as a whole, and the way it has shaped our country.

The Last Chinese Chef


Author: Nicole Mones
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 9780547053738
Category: Fiction
Page: 293
View: 992

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Struggling to recover in the wake of her husband's premature death and stunned by a paternity suit against her husband's estate, food writer Maggie McElroy plans a trip to China to investigate the claim and to profile rising chef Sam Liang, who introduces her to the Chinese concept of food, while drawing her into his extended family and helping her come to terms with her life. Reprint.

To the People, Food Is Heaven

Stories of Food and Life in a Changing China
Author: Dr Audra Ang
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 0762790407
Category: History
Page: 296
View: 6849

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In China, the world’s next superpower, life is comfortable for the fortunate few. For others, it’s a hand-to-mouth struggle for a full stomach, a place to live, wages for work done, and freedom to speak openly. In a place where few things are more important than food, “Have you eaten yet?” is another way of saying hello. After traversing the country and meeting its people, Ang shares her delicious experiences with us. She tells of a clandestine cup of salty yak butter tea with a Tibetan monk during a military crackdown and explains how a fluffy spring onion omelet encapsulates China’s drive for rural development. You’ll have lunch with some of the country's most enduring activists, savor meals with earthquake survivors, and get to know a house cleaner who makes the best fried chicken in all of Beijing. Ang bites into the gaping divide between rich and poor, urban and rural reform, intolerance for dissent, and the growing dissatisfaction with those in power. By serving these topics to us one at a time, To the People, Food Is Heaven provides a fresh perspective beyond the country’s anonymous identity as an economic powerhouse. Ang plates a terrific, wide-ranging feast that is the new China. Have you eaten yet?

Chop Suey, USA

The Story of Chinese Food in America
Author: Yong Chen
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231538162
Category: Social Science
Page: 352
View: 766

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American diners began to flock to Chinese restaurants more than a century ago, making Chinese food the first mass-consumed cuisine in the United States. By 1980, it had become the country's most popular ethnic cuisine. Chop Suey, USA offers the first comprehensive interpretation of the rise of Chinese food, revealing the forces that made it ubiquitous in the American gastronomic landscape and turned the country into an empire of consumption. Engineered by a politically disenfranchised, numerically small, and economically exploited group, Chinese food's tour de America is an epic story of global cultural encounter. It reflects not only changes in taste but also a growing appetite for a more leisurely lifestyle. Americans fell in love with Chinese food not because of its gastronomic excellence but because of its affordability and convenience, which is why they preferred the quick and simple dishes of China while shunning its haute cuisine. Epitomized by chop suey, American Chinese food was a forerunner of McDonald's, democratizing the once-exclusive dining-out experience for such groups as marginalized Anglos, African Americans, and Jews. The rise of Chinese food is also a classic American story of immigrant entrepreneurship and perseverance. Barred from many occupations, Chinese Americans successfully turned Chinese food from a despised cuisine into a dominant force in the restaurant market, creating a critical lifeline for their community. Chinese American restaurant workers developed the concept of the open kitchen and popularized the practice of home delivery. They streamlined certain Chinese dishes, such as chop suey and egg foo young, turning them into nationally recognized brand names.

Shark's Fin and Sichuan Pepper: A Sweet-Sour Memoir of Eating in China


Author: Fuchsia Dunlop
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393248984
Category: Cooking
Page: 336
View: 6445

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"Not just a smart memoir about cross-cultural eating but one of the most engaging books of any kind I've read in years." —Celia Barbour, O, The Oprah Magazine After fifteen years spent exploring China and its food, Fuchsia Dunlop finds herself in an English kitchen, deciding whether to eat a caterpillar she has accidentally cooked in some home-grown vegetables. How can something she has eaten readily in China seem grotesque in England? The question lingers over this “autobiographical food-and-travel classic” (Publishers Weekly).

Every Grain of Rice: Simple Chinese Home Cooking


Author: Fuchsia Dunlop
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393089045
Category: Cooking
Page: 351
View: 2880

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A culinary reference features southern Chinese recipes, shares a comprehensive introduction to key seasonings and techniques, and offers such options as smoky eggplant with garlic, twice-cooked pork, and emergency midnight noodles.

The Dragon's Gift

The Real Story of China in Africa
Author: Deborah Brautigam
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191619760
Category: Political Science
Page: 416
View: 3628

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Is China a rogue donor, as some media pundits suggest? Or is China helping the developing world pave a pathway out of poverty, as the Chinese claim? In the last few years, China's aid program has leapt out of the shadows. Media reports about huge aid packages, support for pariah regimes, regiments of Chinese labor, and the ruthless exploitation of workers and natural resources in some of the poorest countries in the world sparked fierce debates. These debates, however, took place with very few hard facts. China's tradition of secrecy about its aid fueled rumors and speculation, making it difficult to gauge the risks and opportunities provided by China's growing embrace. This well-timed book, by one of the world's leading experts, provides the first comprehensive account of China's aid and economic cooperation overseas. Deborah Brautigam tackles the myths and realities, explaining what the Chinese are doing, how they do it, how much aid they give, and how it all fits into their "going global" strategy. Drawing on three decades of experience in China and Africa, and hundreds of interviews in Africa, China, Europe and the US, Brautigam shines new light on a topic of great interest. China has ended poverty for hundreds of millions of its own citizens. Will Chinese engagement benefit Africa? Using hard data and a series of vivid stories ranging across agriculture, industry, natural resources, and governance, Brautigam's fascinating book provides an answer. It is essential reading for anyone concerned with China's rise, and what it might mean for the challenge of ending poverty in Africa.

From Canton Restaurant to Panda Express

A History of Chinese Food in the United States
Author: Haiming Liu
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780813574745
Category: Cooking
Page: 218
View: 1040

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"The story of Chinese Americans through the lens of food. From Canton Restaurant in 1849 to Panda Express today, Chinese food history in America spans over 150 years. Chinese 'Forty-niners' were mostly merchants and restaurateurs who migrated here not to dig gold but to do trade. Racism against the Chinese slowed down the growth of the Chinese restaurant business in the late 19th century, but it made a rebound in the format of chop suey. From 1900 to the 1960s, chop suey as imagined authentic Chinese food attracted numerous American customers including Jewish Americans as its collective fan. Then the real Chinese food such as Hunan, Sichuan or Shanghai cuisine replaced chop suey houses in the 1970s following the arrival of new Chinese immigrants after immigration reform in 1965. Those regional-flavored Chinese restaurants were brought in and established by immigrants from Taiwan rather than mainland China. As Chinese restaurants in America turned Chinese in flavor, P.F. Chang's and Panda Express rose fast in the 1990s to meet the need of constantly changing and often multi-ethnically blended eating habits of American customers. Chinese food in America is a fascinating history about both Chinese and Americans. Embedded in this history is the story of human migration, culinary tradition, racial politics, ethnic identity, cultural negotiation, Chinese Diaspora and transnational life, and Chinese cuisine as a global food. Though a scholarly work, this book aims at all readers who are interested in food history and culture"--Provided by publisher.