The Radium Girls

The Dark Story of America's Shining Women
Author: Kate Moore
Publisher: Sourcebooks, Inc.
ISBN: 1492649368
Category: History
Page: 496
View: 744

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A New York Times, USA Today, and Wall Street Journal Bestseller! "the glowing ghosts of the radium girls haunt us still."—NPR Books The incredible true story of the women who fought America's Undark danger The Curies' newly discovered element of radium makes gleaming headlines across the nation as the fresh face of beauty, and wonder drug of the medical community. From body lotion to tonic water, the popular new element shines bright in the otherwise dark years of the First World War. Meanwhile, hundreds of girls toil amidst the glowing dust of the radium-dial factories. The glittering chemical covers their bodies from head to toe; they light up the night like industrious fireflies. With such a coveted job, these "shining girls" are the luckiest alive — until they begin to fall mysteriously ill. But the factories that once offered golden opportunities are now ignoring all claims of the gruesome side effects, and the women's cries of corruption. And as the fatal poison of the radium takes hold, the brave shining girls find themselves embroiled in one of the biggest scandals of America's early 20th century, and in a groundbreaking battle for workers' rights that will echo for centuries to come. Written with a sparkling voice and breakneck pace, The Radium Girls fully illuminates the inspiring young women exposed to the "wonder" substance of radium, and their awe-inspiring strength in the face of almost impossible circumstances. Their courage and tenacity led to life-changing regulations, research into nuclear bombing, and ultimately saved hundreds of thousands of lives...

These Shining Lives


Author: Melanie Marnich
Publisher: Dramatists Play Service, Inc.
ISBN: 9780822224488
Category: Drama
Page: 69
View: 3939

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THE STORY: THESE SHINING LIVES chronicles the strength and determination of women considered expendable in their day, exploring their true story and its continued resonance. Catherine and her friends are dying, it's true; but theirs is a story of s

Radium Girls

Women and Industrial Health Reform, 1910-1935
Author: Claudia Clark
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807860816
Category: Social Science
Page: 304
View: 9991

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In the early twentieth century, a group of women workers hired to apply luminous paint to watch faces and instrument dials found themselves among the first victims of radium poisoning. Claudia Clark's book tells the compelling story of these women, who at first had no idea that the tedious task of dialpainting was any different from the other factory jobs available to them. But after repeated exposure to the radium-laced paint, they began to develop mysterious, often fatal illnesses that they traced to conditions in the workplace. Their fight to have their symptoms recognized as an industrial disease represents an important chapter in the history of modern health and labor policy. Clark's account emphasizes the social and political factors that influenced the responses of the workers, managers, government officials, medical specialists, and legal authorities involved in the case. She enriches the story by exploring contemporary disputes over workplace control, government intervention, and industry-backed medical research. Finally, in appraising the dialpainters' campaign to secure compensation and prevention of further incidents--efforts launched with the help of the reform-minded, middle-class women of the Consumers' League--Clark is able to evaluate the achievements and shortcomings of the industrial health movement as a whole.

The Manga Guide(TM) to Biochemistry


Author: Masaharu Takemura
Publisher: No Starch Press
ISBN: 9781593272760
Category: Comics & Graphic Novels
Page: 253
View: 5474

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"The latest addition to No Starch Press's EduManga series, The Manga Guide to Biochemistry uses Japanese comics, clear explanations, and a charming storyline to explain the basics of biochemistry. This volume begins with a discussion of the cells that make up living beings, as well as the basics of protein synthesis, metabolism, energy production, and photosynthesis. It goes on to cover ecosystems and material cycles; the mechanisms of respiration; lipids, cholesterol, and blood types; and the roles and structures of enzymes and proteins. Readers explore genes and DNA; the differences between biochemistry and molecular biology; and the mystery surrounding the origin of the cell, all with the aid of original Manga cartoons. This EduManga title is co-published with Ohmsha, Ltd. of Tokyo, Japan, and is one in a series of translations from Ohmsha's bestselling Japanese originals"--

The Unlikely Voyage of Jack De Crow

A Mirror Odyssey from North Wales to the Black Sea
Author: A. J. Mackinnon
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1574093436
Category: Sports & Recreation
Page: 356
View: 4364

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Equipped with his cheerful optimism and a pith helmet, this Odysseus in a dinghy takes you with him from the borders of north Wales to the Black Sea - 4,900 kilometers over salt and fresh water, under sail, at oars, or at the end of a tow rope - through twelve countries, 282 locks, and numerous trials and adventures, including an encounter with Balkan pirates.

The Only Harmless Great Thing


Author: Brooke Bolander
Publisher: Tor.com
ISBN: 1250169488
Category: Fiction
Page: 96
View: 9871

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The Only Harmless Great Thing is a heart-wrenching alternative history by Brooke Bolander that imagines an intersection between the Radium Girls and noble, sentient elephants. In the early years of the 20th century, a group of female factory workers in Newark, New Jersey slowly died of radiation poisoning. Around the same time, an Indian elephant was deliberately put to death by electricity in Coney Island. These are the facts. Now these two tragedies are intertwined in a dark alternate history of rage, radioactivity, and injustice crying out to be righted. Prepare yourself for a wrenching journey that crosses eras, chronicling histories of cruelty both grand and petty in search of meaning and justice.

Ranger Confidential

Living, Working, and Dying in the National Parks
Author: Andrea Lankford
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 0762762683
Category: Nature
Page: 256
View: 6309

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For twelve years, Andrea Lankford lived in the biggest, most impressive national parks in the world, working a job she loved. She chaperoned baby sea turtles on their journey to sea. She pursued bad guys on her galloping patrol horse. She jumped into rescue helicopters bound for the heart of the Grand Canyon. She won arguments with bears. She slept with a few too many rattlesnakes. Hell yeah, it was the best job in the world! Fortunately, Andrea survived it. In this graphic and yet surprisingly funny account of her and others’ extraordinary careers, Lankford unveils a world in which park rangers struggle to maintain their idealism in the face of death, disillusionment, and the loss of a comrade killed while holding that thin green line between protecting the park from the people, the people from the park, and the people from each other. Ranger Confidential is the story behind the scenery of the nation’s crown jewels—Yosemite, Grand Canyon, Yellowstone, Great Smokies, Denali. In these iconic landscapes, where nature and humanity constantly collide, scenery can be as cruel as it is redemptive.

Felix the Railway Cat


Author: Kate Moore
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 1405929790
Category: Pets
Page: 272
View: 8885

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It will make you laugh and it will make you cry: Felix The Railway Cat is the extraordinary tale of a close-knit community and its amazing bond with a very special cat. 'The global sensation' Daily Telegraph When Felix arrived at Yorkshire's Huddersfield Train Station as an eight-week-old kitten, no one knew just how important this little ball of fluff would become. Although she has a vital job to do as 'Senior Pest Controller', Felix is much more than just an employee of TransPennine Express. Felix changes lives in surprising ways. She is always ready to leap into action and save the day: from bringing a boy with autism out of his shell to providing comfort to a runaway child shivering on the platform one night. So when tragedy hits the team at Huddersfield, it is only Felix who can pull them back together. But a chance friendship with a commuter that she waits for her on the platform every morning finally gives Felix the recognition she deserves, catapulting her to international stardom . . . Royalties from the sale of this book will be donated to Prostate Cancer UK (registered charity 1005541, SC039332).

Crude Justice

How I Fought Big Oil and Won, and What You Should Know About the New Environmental Attack on America
Author: Stuart H. Smith
Publisher: BenBella Books, Inc.
ISBN: 1940363446
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 264
View: 4390

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“A page turner that reads like a crime novel—only the events documented in the book are all too real” (David Sirota, author of Back to Our Future). One day in Laurel, Mississippi, a twenty-six-year-old expectant mom named Karen Street sat down at the edge of her bathtub—and felt her hip split in two. The episode was so bizarre that it wasn’t until later—after she saw the doctor—that she realized her bone disease was almost certainly linked to her father-in-law’s business. Winston Street ran a machine shop that drilled the gunk out of pipes used by Chevron, Shell, and other giants of the oil industry—creating a white powder that covered Karen Street’s husband’s overalls every night, which then landed in their vegetable garden . . . and was highly radioactive. Winston Street didn’t know the dust was poisonous, nor did his workers or his family. But someone did. There was evidence that America’s big oil companies were aware for decades that they were pulling up radium from under the earth, poisoning yards like Street’s while dumping radioactive water in unlined pits across the South. Now, to prove that and win justice for his blue-collar clients, an untested young lawyer named Stuart H. Smith and his eccentric team would have to get the better of America’s best-known radiation attorney and the global clout of Chevron inside a Mississippi courtroom. Crude Justice tells how the Little Guy can take on the behemoth of Big Oil and win—with the help of a good attorney. Recounting more than two decades as a top environmental lawyer in the toxic oil patch of the American South, Smith tells the story of how he upped the ante again and again—getting the best of Chevron, then taking on the world’s most powerful corporation, ExxonMobil, with $1 billion on the line, and finally ferreting out the elusive truth behind BP’s 2010 Deepwater Horizon disaster, the worst oil spill in US history. Smith finally builds upon the courtroom drama of his past and the environmental threats of the present—from fracking to the Keystone XL pipeline—to issue a resounding call for America to break its crippling addiction to fossil fuels.

A Series of Catastrophes and Miracles

A True Story of Love, Science, and Cancer
Author: Mary Elizabeth Williams
Publisher: National Geographic Books
ISBN: 1426216335
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 304
View: 3228

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"A wry, witty account of what it is like to face death--and be restored to life. After being diagnosed in her early 40s with metastatic melanoma--a "rapidly fatal" form of cancer--journalist and mother of two Mary Elizabeth Williams finds herself in a race against the clock. She takes a once-in-a-lifetime chance and joins a clinical trial for immunotherapy, a revolutionary drug regimen that trains the body to vanquish malignant cells. Astonishingly, her cancer disappears entirely in just a few weeks. But at the same time, her best friend embarks on a cancer journey of her own--with very different results. Williams's experiences as a patient and a medical test subject reveal with stark honesty what it takes to weather disease, the extraordinary new developments that are rewriting the rules of science--and the healing power of human connection"--

Lolas' House

Filipino Women Living with War
Author: M. Evelina Galang
Publisher: Northwestern University Press
ISBN: 0810135876
Category: History
Page: 224
View: 940

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During World War II more than one thousand Filipinas were kidnapped by the Imperial Japanese Army. Lolas’ House tells the stories of sixteen surviving Filipino “comfort women.” M. Evelina Galang enters into the lives of the women at Lolas’ House, a community center in metro Manila. She accompanies them to the sites of their abduction and protests with them at the gates of the Japanese embassy. Each woman gives her testimony, and even though the women relive their horror at each telling, they offer their stories so that no woman anywhere should suffer wartime rape and torture. Lolas’ House is a book of testimony, but it is also a book of witness, of survival, and of the female body. Intensely personal and globally political, it is the legacy of Lolas’ House to the world.

The Red Book of Heroes


Author: Mrs. Andrew Lang
Publisher: Library of Alexandria
ISBN: 1465601139
Category:
Page: N.A
View: 9463

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'Life is not all beer and skittles,' said a reflective sportsman, and all books are not fairy tales. In an imperfect state of existence, 'the peety of it is that we cannot have all things as we would like them.' Undeniably we would like all books to be fairy tales or novels, and at present most of them are. But there is another side to things, and we must face it. '"Life is real, life is earnest," as Tennyson tells us,' said an orator to whom I listened lately, and though Longfellow, not Tennyson, wrote the famous line quoted by the earnest speaker, yet there is a good deal of truth in it. The word 'earnest,' like many other good words, has been overdone. It is common to sneer at 'earnest workers,' yet where would we be without them, especially in our climate? In a Polynesian island, where the skies for ever smile, and the blacks for ever dance, earnestness is superfluous. The bread-fruit tree delivers its rolls punctually every morning, strawberries or other fruits, as nice, spring beneath the feet of the dancers; the cavern in the forest provides a roof and shelter from the sun; the sea supplies a swimming-bath, and man, in time of peace, has only to enjoy himself, eat and drink, laugh and love, sing songs and tell fairy tales. His drapery is woven of fragrant flowers, nobody is poor and anxious about food, nobody is rich and afraid of losing his money, nobody needs to think of helping others; he has only to put forth his hand, or draw his bow or swing his fishing-rod, and help himself. To be sure, in time of war, man has just got to be earnest, and think out plans for catching and spearing his enemies, and drill his troops and improve his weapons, in fact to do some work, or have his throat cut, and be put in the oven and eaten. Thus it is really hard for the most fortunate people to avoid being earnest now and then. The people whose stories are told in this book were very different from each other in many ways. The child abbess, M�re AngŽlique, ruling her convent, and at war with naughty abbesses who hated being earnest, does not at once remind us of Hannibal. The great Montrose, with his poems and his scented love-locks, his devotion to his cause, his chivalry, his death, to which he went gaily clad like a bridegroom to meet his bride, does not seem a companion for Palissy the Potter, all black and shrunk and wrinkled, and bowed over his furnaces. It is a long way from gentle Miss Nightingale, tending wounded dogs when a child, and wounded soldiers when a woman, to Charles Gordon playing wild tricks at school, leading a Chinese army, watching alone at Khartoum, in a circle of cruel foes, for the sight of the British colours, and the sounds of the bagpipes that never met his eyes and ears.

The Good Wife's Guide (Le Ménagier de Paris)

A Medieval Household Book
Author: N.A
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801462118
Category: History
Page: 384
View: 8877

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In the closing years of the fourteenth century, an anonymous French writer compiled a book addressed to a fifteen-year-old bride, narrated in the voice of her husband, a wealthy, aging Parisian. The book was designed to teach this young wife the moral attributes, duties, and conduct befitting a woman of her station in society, in the almost certain event of her widowhood and subsequent remarriage. The work also provides a rich assembly of practical materials for the wife's use and for her household, including treatises on gardening and shopping, tips on choosing servants, directions on the medical care of horses and the training of hawks, plus menus for elaborate feasts, and more than 380 recipes. The Good Wife's Guide is the first complete modern English translation of this important medieval text also known as Le Ménagier de Paris (the Parisian household book), a work long recognized for its unique insights into the domestic life of the bourgeoisie during the later Middle Ages. The Good Wife's Guide, expertly rendered into modern English by Gina L. Greco and Christine M. Rose, is accompanied by an informative critical introduction setting the work in its proper medieval context as a conduct manual. This edition presents the book in its entirety, as it must have existed for its earliest readers. The Guide is now a treasure for the classroom, appealing to anyone studying medieval literature or history or considering the complex lives of medieval women. It illuminates the milieu and composition process of medieval authors and will in turn fascinate cooking or horticulture enthusiasts. The work illustrates how a (perhaps fictional) Parisian householder of the late fourteenth century might well have trained his wife so that her behavior could reflect honorably on him and enhance his reputation.

The Hello Girls

America's First Women Soldiers
Author: Elizabeth Cobbs,Elizabeth Cobbs Hoffman
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674971477
Category: History
Page: 400
View: 5501

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In 1918 the U.S. Army Signal Corps sent 223 women to France to help win World War I. Elizabeth Cobbs reveals the challenges these patriotic young women faced in a war zone where male soldiers resented, wooed, mocked, saluted, and ultimately celebrated them. Back on the home front, they fought the army for veterans’ benefits and medals, and won.

The Poisoner's Handbook

Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York
Author: Deborah Blum
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101524898
Category: Medical
Page: 336
View: 7117

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Equal parts true crime, twentieth-century history, and science thriller, The Poisoner's Handbook is "a vicious, page-turning story that reads more like Raymond Chandler than Madame Curie" (The New York Observer) A fascinating Jazz Age tale of chemistry and detection, poison and murder, The Poisoner's Handbook is a page-turning account of a forgotten era. In early twentieth-century New York, poisons offered an easy path to the perfect crime. Science had no place in the Tammany Hall-controlled coroner's office, and corruption ran rampant. However, with the appointment of chief medical examiner Charles Norris in 1918, the poison game changed forever. Together with toxicologist Alexander Gettler, the duo set the justice system on fire with their trailblazing scientific detective work, triumphing over seemingly unbeatable odds to become the pioneers of forensic chemistry and the gatekeepers of justice. In 2014, PBS's AMERICAN EXPERIENCE released a film based on The Poisoner's Handbook.

Real Frank Zappa Book


Author: Frank Zappa,Peter Occhiogrosso
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0671705725
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 352
View: 817

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Recounts the life and career of the inventive and controversial rock musician, and includes information on his philosophies on art, his opinions on the music industry, and his thoughts on raising children.

Radium Halos

A Novel about the Radium Dial Painters
Author: Shelley Stout
Publisher: CreateSpace
ISBN: 9781497321236
Category: Fiction
Page: 226
View: 4914

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Radium Halos is historical fiction based on the true events of the Radium Girls: a group of female factory workers who, in the early 1920s, contracted radiation poisoning from painting luminous watch and clock dials with radium paint. Our narrator is Helen Waterman, a 65-year-old mental patient who worked at the factory when she was 16. She tells us her story through flashbacks, slowly revealing her past, the loved ones she’s lost, and the dangerous secrets she’s kept all these years. "While the subject matter is intense, the tone of the novel is surprisingly light. Thanks is due to Helen who adds humor through her naive and bluntly honest outlook."The Historical Novel Review"At turns humorous, feisty, and heartrendingly childlike, Helen’s narrative voice is powerfully blunt."Red Adept's Kindle Book Review Blog"5 Stars......this was a novel to tug at the heart."FOREWORDby Leonard GrossmanFive years before I was born, my father, Leonard J. Grossman, represented women from Ottawa, Illinois in litigation against the Radium Dial Corporation seeking not merely damages but also recognition of what had been done to them. I grew up in the shadow of the Radium Dial case, a landmark in workers’ rights in this country. I was deeply proud of my father and infuriated, as he was, by the injustice inflicted on these women. I am sure this background is one reason I became a government lawyer enforcing workers’ rights. So when I came across Radium Halos by Shelley Stout I was very excited.Sometimes fiction can speak truth in ways that the bare facts cannot. Ms. Stout has found a unique voice in which to tell the tragic story of the Radium Dial workers and at the same time to say much about life in this country. The story goes beyond the Radium Dial case and reflects much about our attitudes toward work, women, mental illness and aging. Along the way it speaks of fear and loyalty and truth itself.Leonard GrossmanSeptember 2009

Jews in the Japanese Mind

The History and Uses of a Cultural Stereotype
Author: David G. Goodman,Masanori Miyazawa
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 9780739101674
Category: History
Page: 396
View: 1909

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Why are the Japanese fascinated with the Jews? By showing that the modern attitude is the result of a process of accretion begun 200 years ago, this book describes the development behind Japanese ideas of Jews and how these images are reflected in their modern intellectual life

A Female Genius

How Ada Lovelace Lord Byron's Daughter, Started the Computer Age
Author: James Essinger
Publisher: Severn House Paperbacks
ISBN: 9781908096661
Category: Calculators
Page: 256
View: 8595

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This new biography tells for the first time the story of the woman who, alongside Charles Babbage, invented the world's first computer. The daughter of Lord Byron, Ada was the visionary who recognised the true potential of Babbage's of cog-wheel computer, The Analytical Engine. She demonstrated to the world that computers wouldn't merely be adding machines, but that they would be able to think. Ada and Babbage may have been colleagues, but they were also the closest of friends. Though she was 20 years his junior, they develope lasting relationship that blossomed into romance. Babbage was a genius and Ada was a woman with a singular vision, unconstrained by her by her time. Here we learn of their friendship and extraordinary legacy.