The Race Beat

The Press, the Civil Rights Struggle, and the Awakening of a Nation
Author: Gene Roberts,Hank Klibanoff
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307455947
Category: History
Page: 544
View: 5061

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An unprecedented examination of how news stories, editorials and photographs in the American press—and the journalists responsible for them—profoundly changed the nation’s thinking about civil rights in the South during the 1950s and ‘60s. Roberts and Klibanoff draw on private correspondence, notes from secret meetings, unpublished articles, and interviews to show how a dedicated cadre of newsmen—black and white—revealed to a nation its most shameful shortcomings that compelled its citizens to act. Meticulously researched and vividly rendered, The Race Beat is an extraordinary account of one of the most calamitous periods in our nation’s history, as told by those who covered it. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Race Beat

The Press, the Civil Rights Struggle, and the Awakening of a Nation
Author: Gene Roberts,Hank Klibanoff
Publisher: Vintage Books
ISBN: 0679735658
Category: History
Page: 518
View: 4404

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Analyzes how the news stories, editorials, and photographs in the American press--as well as the journalists responsible for them--helped transform the nation's attitude toward civil rights in the South during the 1950s and 1960s.

The Race Beat

The Press, the Civil Rights Struggle, and the Awakening of a Nation
Author: Gene Roberts,Hank Klibanoff
Publisher: Vintage Books
ISBN: 0679735658
Category: History
Page: 518
View: 9044

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Analyzes how the news stories, editorials, and photographs in the American press--as well as the journalists responsible for them--helped transform the nation's attitude toward civil rights in the South during the 1950s and 1960s.

Shocking the Conscience

A Reporter's Account of the Civil Rights Movement
Author: Simeon Booker,Carol McCabe Booker
Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 1617037893
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 334
View: 7825

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A reporter discusses his coverage of the civil rights movement, focusing on the death of Emmett Till.

Civil Rights Movement

People and Perspectives
Author: Michael Ezra
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1598840371
Category: History
Page: 250
View: 2644

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Presents a collection of essays about the history of the civil rights movement, focusing on the efforts of clergy, student activists, black nationalists, and such organizations as the NCAAP and Core to bring about racial equality.

A Boy from Georgia

Coming of Age in the Segregated South
Author: Hamilton Jordan
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820348899
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 228
View: 8525

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This memoir by one of our great political strategists chronicles Hamilton Jordan's childhood in Albany, Georgia, charting his moral and intellectual development as he discovers the complicated legacies of racism, religious intolerance, andsouthern politics, and affords his readers an intimate view of the state's wheelersand dealers.

Paper Soldiers

The American Press and the Vietnam War
Author: Clarence R. Wyatt
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226917955
Category: History
Page: 272
View: 9606

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Praised and condemned for its aggressive coverage of the Vietnam War, the American press has been both commended for breaking public support and bringing the war to an end and accused of misrepresenting the nature and progress of the war. While in-depth combat coverage and the instantaneous power of television were used to challenge the war, Clarence R. Wyatt demonstrates that, more often than not, the press reported official information, statements, and views. Examining the relationship between the press and the government, Wyatt looks at how difficult it was to obtain information outside official briefings, what sort of professional constraints the press worked under, and what happened when reporters chose not to "get on the team." "Wyatt makes the Diem period in Saigon come to life—the primitive communications, the police crackdowns, the quarrels within the news organizations between the pessimists in Saigon and the optimists in Washington and New York."—Peter Braestrup, Washington Times "An important, readable study of the Vietnam press corps—the most maligned group of journalists in modern American history. Clarence Wyatt's insights and assessments are particularly valuable now that the media is rapidly growing in its influence on domestic and international affairs."—Peter Arnett, CNN foreign correspondent

Beware of Limbo Dancers

A Correspondent’s Adventures with the New York Times
Author: Roy Reed
Publisher: University of Arkansas Press
ISBN: 1610755022
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 261
View: 4668

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This witty, wide-ranging memoir from Roy Reed--a native Arkansan who became a reporter for the New York Times--begins with tales of the writer's formative years growing up in Arkansas and the start of his career at the legendary Arkansas Gazette. Reed joined the New York Times in 1965 and was quickly thrust into the chaos of the Selma, Alabama, protest movement and the historical interracial march to Montgomery. His story then moves from days of racial violence to the political combat of Washington. Reed covered the Johnson White House and the early days of the Nixon administration as it wrestled with the competing demands of black voters and southern resistance to a new world. The memoir concludes with engaging postings from New Orleans and London and other travels of a reporter always on the lookout for new people, old ways, good company, and fresh outrages.

Alone Atop the Hill

The Autobiography of Alice Dunnigan, Pioneer of the National Black Press
Author: Alice Dunnigan
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820348600
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 240
View: 755

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In 1942 Alice Allison Dunnigan, a sharecropper's daughter from Kentucky, made her way to the nation's capitol and a career in journalism that eventually led her to the White House. With Alone atop the Hill, Carol McCabe Booker has condensed Dunnigan's 1974 self-published autobiography to appeal to a general audience and has added scholarly annotations that provide historical context. Dunnigan's dynamic story reveals her importance to the fields of journalism, women's history, and the civil rights movement and creates a compelling portrait of a groundbreaking American. Dunnigan recounts her formative years in rural Kentucky as she struggled for a living, telling bluntly and simply what life was like in a Border State in the first half of the twentieth century. Later she takes readers to Washington, D.C., where we see her rise from a typist during World War II to a reporter. Ultimately she would become the first black female reporter accredited to the White House; to travel with a U.S. president; credentialed by the House and Senate Press Galleries; accredited to the Department of State and the Supreme Court; voted into the White House Newswomen's Association and the Women's National Press Club; and recognized as a Washington sports reporter. A contemporary of Helen Thomas and a forerunner of Ethel Payne, Dunnigan traveled with President Truman on his coast-to-coast, whistle-stop tour; was the first reporter to query President Eisenhower about civil rights; and provided front-page coverage for more than one hundred black newspapers of virtually every race issue before the Congress, the federal courts, and the presidential administration. Here she provides an uninhibited, unembellished, and unvarnished look at the terrain, the players, and the politics in a rough-and-tumble national capital struggling to make its way through a nascent, postwar racial revolution.

Heartbeat of Struggle

The Revolutionary Life of Yuri Kochiyama
Author: Diane Carol Fujino
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 9780816645930
Category: Social Science
Page: 396
View: 2227

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Presents the biography of the courageous Asian American activist who, on February 12, 1965, cradled Malcolm X in her arms as he died, although her role as a public servant and activist began much earlier than this pivotal public moment. Simultaneous.

Lenin's Tomb

The Last Days of the Soviet Empire
Author: David Remnick
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0804173583
Category: History
Page: 624
View: 820

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Winner of the Pulitzer Prize One of the Best Books of the Year: The New York Times From the editor of The New Yorker: a riveting account of the collapse of the Soviet Union, which has become the standard book on the subject. Lenin’s Tomb combines the global vision of the best historical scholarship with the immediacy of eyewitness journalism. Remnick takes us through the tumultuous 75-year period of Communist rule leading up to the collapse and gives us the voices of those who lived through it, from democratic activists to Party members, from anti-Semites to Holocaust survivors, from Gorbachev to Yeltsin to Sakharov. An extraordinary history of an empire undone, Lenin’s Tomb stands as essential reading for our times.

A Spirit of Charity

Restoring the Bond Between America and Its Public Hospitals
Author: Mike King
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781944962067
Category: Medical
Page: 345
View: 2687

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Most Americans have historically viewed the nation's great public hospitals as refuges of last resort for poor and uninsured people. But these iconic institutions some recently closed, some renamed, others rebuilt -- have also served as a safety valve for the nation's highly profitable medical industrial complex. They are a key to understanding the evolution of America's $3 trillion health care system, not just for the poor, but the affluent as well, argues veteran journalist Mike King. Through an examination of their unique history and an incisive analysis of policy successes and failures, A Spirit of Charity reveals the remarkable story of why public hospitals matter and why they should play a more prominent role in our public policy discussions.

Mapping the Heavens

The Radical Scientific Ideas That Reveal the Cosmos
Author: Priyamvada Natarajan
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300204418
Category: Science
Page: 267
View: 2082

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For all curious readers, a lively introduction to radical ideas and discoveries that are transforming our knowledge of the universe This book provides a tour of the "greatest hits" of cosmological discoveries--the ideas that reshaped our universe over the past century. The cosmos, once understood as a stagnant place, filled with the ordinary, is now a universe that is expanding at an accelerating pace, propelled by dark energy and structured by dark matter. Priyamvada Natarajan, our guide to these ideas, is someone at the forefront of the research--an astrophysicist who literally creates maps of invisible matter in the universe. She not only explains for a wide audience the science behind these essential ideas but also provides an understanding of how radical scientific theories gain acceptance. The formation and growth of black holes, dark matter halos, the accelerating expansion of the universe, the echo of the big bang, the discovery of exoplanets, and the possibility of other universes--these are some of the puzzling cosmological topics of the early twenty-first century. Natarajan discusses why the acceptance of new ideas about the universe and our place in it has never been linear and always contested even within the scientific community. And she affirms that, shifting and incomplete as science always must be, it offers the best path we have toward making sense of our wondrous, mysterious universe.

The Unsteady March

The Rise and Decline of Racial Equality in America
Author: Philip A. Klinkner,Rogers M. Smith
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226443416
Category: Political Science
Page: 426
View: 2352

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With its insights into contemporary racial politics, "The Unsteady March" offers a penetrating and controversial analysis of American race relations across two centuries.

The Bill of the Century

The Epic Battle for the Civil Rights Act
Author: Clay Risen
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA
ISBN: 1608198243
Category: History
Page: 308
View: 4038

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A 50th anniversary tribute chronicles the historical struggle to bring the Civil Rights Act into law, profiling a wide range of contributing figures in religious, public and political arenas. 60,000 first printing.

Creative Interviewing

The Writer's Guide to Gathering Information by Asking Questions
Author: Ken Metzler
Publisher: Pearson College Division
ISBN: 9780205262588
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 238
View: 2759

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Filled with anecdotal examples from actual professional experiences, Creative Interviewing shows how to turn interviews into writing that make scenes and incidents come alive in the reader's mind. Metzler offers step-by-step instructions on how to prepare for and conduct a good interview, how to obtain dramatic anecdotes from sources, how to cope with dynamics of a series of interviews with certain topics.

The Selling of Civil Rights

The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and the Use of Public Relations
Author: Vanessa Murphree
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135523231
Category: History
Page: 206
View: 5087

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The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee formed in April 1960 to advance civil rights. With a tremendous human rights mission facing them, the founding SNCC members included communication and publicity as part of their initial purpose. This book provides a broad overview of these efforts from SNCC's birth in 1960 until the beginning of its demise in the late 1960s and examines the communication tools that SNCC leaders and members used to organize, launch, and carry out their campaign to promote civil rights throughout the 1960s. It specifically explores how SNCC workers used public relations to support and promote their platforms and to build a grassroots community movement; and how the organization later rejected these strategies for a radical and isolated approach.

Burial for a King

Martin Luther King Jr.'s Funeral and the Week that Transformed Atlanta and Rocked the Nation
Author: Rebecca Burns
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781439143094
Category: History
Page: 256
View: 5237

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In the aftermath of Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination, riots broke out in 110 cities across the country. For five days, Atlanta braced for chaos while preparing to host King’s funeral. An unlikely alliance of former student radicals, the middle-aged patrician mayor, the no-nonsense police chief, black ministers, white churchgoers, Atlanta’s business leaders, King’s grieving family members, and his stunned SCLC colleagues worked to keep Atlanta safe, honor a murdered hero, and host the tens of thousands who came to pay tribute. On April 9, 1968, 150,000 mourners took part in a daylong series of rituals honoring King—the largest funeral staged for a private U.S. citizen. King’s funeral was a dramatic event that took place against a national backdrop of war protests and presidential politics in a still-segregationist South, where Georgia’s governor surrounded the state capitol with troops and refused to lower the flag in acknowledgment of King’s death. Award-winning journalist Rebecca Burns delivers a riveting account of this landmark week and chronicles the convergence of politicians, celebrities, militants, and ordinary people who mourned in a peaceful Atlanta while other cities burned. Drawing upon copious research and dozens of interviews— from staffers at the White House who dealt with the threat of violence to members of King’s family and inner circle—Burns brings this dramatic story to life in vivid scenes that sweep readers from the mayor’s office to the White House to Coretta Scott King’s bedroom. Compelling and original, Burial for a King captures a defining moment in America’s history. It encapsulates King’s legacy, America’s shifting attitude toward race, and the emergence of Atlanta as a new kind of Southern city.

Resurrection

The Struggle for a New Russia
Author: David Remnick
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0375750231
Category: History
Page: 412
View: 895

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Offers a study of the Soviet Union in the aftermath of communism, tracing Russia's search for stability following the chaotic elections of 1996

Devils Walking

Klan Murders along the Mississippi in the 1960s
Author: Stanley Nelson
Publisher: LSU Press
ISBN: 0807164097
Category: True Crime
Page: 320
View: 5206

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After midnight on December 10, 1964, in Ferriday, Louisiana, African American Frank Morris awoke to the sound of breaking glass. Outside his home and shoe shop, standing behind the shattered window, Klansmen tossed a lit match inside the store, now doused in gasoline, and instantly set the building ablaze. A shotgun pointed to Morris’s head blocked his escape from the flames. Four days later Morris died, though he managed in his last hours to describe his attackers to the FBI. Frank Morris’s death was one of several Klan murders that terrorized residents of northeast Louisiana and Mississippi, as the perpetrators continued to elude prosecution during this brutal era in American history. In Devils Walking: Klan Murders along the Mississippi in the 1960s, Pulitzer Prize finalist and journalist Stanley Nelson details his investigation—alongside renewed FBI attention—into these cold cases, as he uncovers the names of the Klan’s key members as well as systemized corruption and coordinated deception by those charged with protecting all citizens. Devils Walking recounts the little-known facts and haunting stories that came to light from Nelson’s hundreds of interviews with both witnesses and suspects. His research points to the development of a particularly virulent local faction of the Klan who used terror and violence to stop integration and end the advancement of civil rights. Secretly led by the savage and cunning factory worker Red Glover, these Klansmen—a handpicked group that included local police officers and sheriff’s deputies—discarded Klan robes for civilian clothes and formed the underground Silver Dollar Group, carrying a silver dollar as a sign of unity. Their eight known victims, mostly African American men, ranged in age from nineteen to sixty-seven and included one Klansman seeking redemption for his past actions. Following the 2007 FBI reopening of unsolved civil rights–era cases, Nelson’s articles in the Concordia Sentinel prompted the first grand jury hearing for these crimes. By unmasking those responsible for these atrocities and giving a voice to the victims’ families, Devils Walking demonstrates the importance of confronting and addressing the traumatic legacy of racism.