The Public and Its Problems

An Essay in Political Inquiry
Author: John Dewey
Publisher: Ohio University Press
ISBN: 0804040737
Category: Political Science
Page: 304
View: 5501

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More than six decades after John Dewey’s death, his political philosophy is undergoing a revival. With renewed interest in pragmatism and its implications for democracy in an age of mass communication, bureaucracy, and ever-increasing social complexities, Dewey’s The Public and Its Problems, first published in 1927, remains vital to any discussion of today’s political issues. This edition of The Public and Its Problems, meticulously annotated and interpreted with fresh insight by Melvin L. Rogers, radically updates the previous version published by Swallow Press. Rogers’s introduction locates Dewey’s work within its philosophical and historical context and explains its key ideas for a contemporary readership. Biographical information and a detailed bibliography round out this definitive edition, which will be essential to students and scholars both.

The Public and Its Problems

An Essay in Political Inquiry
Author: John Dewey,Melvin L. Rogers
Publisher: Penn State Press
ISBN: 0271055693
Category: Philosophy
Page: 190
View: 9559

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"An annotated edition of John Dewey's work of democratic theory, first published in 1927. Includes a substantive introduction and bibliographical essay"--Provided by publisher.

Inclusion and Democracy


Author: Iris Marion Young
Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 9780198297550
Category: Political Science
Page: 304
View: 2038

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'Young advances a nuanced way of thinking about the problem of political exclusion, and its potential remedies... Young's book is a timely intervention urging an enlargement of political vision. Inclusion and Democracy is an important text, which will rightly generate a deal of provocative debate.' -Radical PhilosophyIn the long awaited follow-up to Justice and the Politics of Difference, Iris Marion Young- one of the world's leading political philosophers- makes major and controversial contribution to the debates about democracy in a multicultural society. The book considers the ideals of political inclusion and exclusion and recommends ways of engaging in democratic politics in a more inclusive way. It includes a discussion of class, race and gender bias in democratic processes, and asks whether in an era of greater global interaction, democratic institutions should become more global

Publics and Counterpublics


Author: Michael Warner
Publisher: Zone Books (NY)
ISBN: 9781890951290
Category: Social Science
Page: 334
View: 5909

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An investigation of how the idea of a public as a central fiction of modern life informs our literature, politics, and culture.

Exploitation

What it is and why It's Wrong
Author: Ruth J. Sample
Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 9780742513679
Category: Philosophy
Page: 197
View: 8352

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Exploitation locates what it is we recognize as bad when we judge a situation to be exploitative. Ideal for courses in social and political philosophy, public policy, or political science.

Public Modalities


Author: Daniel C. Brouwer,Robert Asen
Publisher: University of Alabama Press
ISBN: 0817355855
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 279
View: 1314

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Bringing together scholars in rhetorical, cultural, and media studies, this collection of new case studies illustrates a modalities approach to the study of publics. These case studies explore the implications of different ways of forming publics, including alternative means of expression, the intersection of politics and consumerism, and online engagement. In doing so, they raise important questions of access, community, and political efficacy.--[book cover].

The Political Writings


Author: John Dewey,Debra Morris,Ian Shapiro
Publisher: Hackett Publishing
ISBN: 9780872201903
Category: Political Science
Page: 248
View: 1161

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This welcome anthology presents for the first time in one volume John Dewey's major political writings. Ranging throughout his career, the selections display Dewey's philosophical method, his controversial views on war and education, his essential contributions to democratic theory, and his distinctive brand of progressive political ideology. A substantial introductory essay sets the selections in historical context, explains their continuing relevance to American politics, and explores the revivial of interest in Dewey in recent years.

The Priority of Democracy

Political Consequences of Pragmatism
Author: Jack Knight,James Johnson
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400840335
Category: Political Science
Page: 348
View: 7574

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Pragmatism and its consequences are central issues in American politics today, yet scholars rarely examine in detail the relationship between pragmatism and politics. In The Priority of Democracy, Jack Knight and James Johnson systematically explore the subject and make a strong case for adopting a pragmatist approach to democratic politics--and for giving priority to democracy in the process of selecting and reforming political institutions. What is the primary value of democracy? When should we make decisions democratically and when should we rely on markets? And when should we accept the decisions of unelected officials, such as judges or bureaucrats? Knight and Johnson explore how a commitment to pragmatism should affect our answers to such important questions. They conclude that democracy is a good way of determining how these kinds of decisions should be made--even if what the democratic process determines is that not all decisions should be made democratically. So, for example, the democratically elected U.S. Congress may legitimately remove monetary policy from democratic decision-making by putting it under the control of the Federal Reserve. Knight and Johnson argue that pragmatism offers an original and compelling justification of democracy in terms of the unique contributions democratic institutions can make to processes of institutional choice. This focus highlights the important role that democracy plays, not in achieving consensus or commonality, but rather in addressing conflicts. Indeed, Knight and Johnson suggest that democratic politics is perhaps best seen less as a way of reaching consensus or agreement than as a way of structuring the terms of persistent disagreement.

The Vocation Lectures


Author: Max Weber,David S. Owen,Tracy B. Strong
Publisher: Hackett Publishing
ISBN: 1624660045
Category:
Page: 176
View: 5220

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Originally published separately, Weber's 'Science as a Vocation' and 'Politics as a Vocation' stand as the classic formulations of his positions on two related subjects that go to the heart of his thought: the nature and status of science and its claims to authority; and the nature and status of political claims and the ultimate justification for such claims. Together in this volume, these newly translated lectures offer an ideal point of entry into Weber's central project: understanding how, as Weber put it, "in the West alone there have appeared cultural manifestations [that seem to] go in the direction of universal significance and validity."

The Power of Religion in the Public Sphere


Author: Judith Butler,Jurgen Habermas,Charles Taylor,Cornel West
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231527255
Category: Philosophy
Page: 128
View: 7955

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The Power of Religion in the Public Sphere represents a rare opportunity to experience a diverse group of preeminent philosophers confronting one pervasive contemporary concern: what role does or should religion play in our public lives? Reflecting on her recent work concerning state violence in Israel-Palestine, Judith Butler explores the potential of religious perspectives for renewing cultural and political criticism, while Jürgen Habermas, best known for his seminal conception of the public sphere, thinks through the ambiguous legacy of the concept of "the political" in contemporary theory. Charles Taylor argues for a radical redefinition of secularism, and Cornel West defends civil disobedience and emancipatory theology. Eduardo Mendieta and Jonathan VanAntwerpen detail the immense contribution of these philosophers to contemporary social and political theory, and an afterword by Craig Calhoun places these attempts to reconceive the significance of both religion and the secular in the context of contemporary national and international politics.

The Undiscovered Dewey

Religion, Morality, and the Ethos of Democracy
Author: Melvin L. Rogers
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231144873
Category: Philosophy
Page: 328
View: 3224

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Examines how Charles Darwin's theories on evolution profoundly impacted John Dewey's beliefs on inquiry, contingency, and uncertainty, and analyses how the resulting arguments have created philosophical shortcomings regarding the human experience.

Art and the Public Sphere


Author: W. J. Thomas Mitchell
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Art
Page: 268
View: 577

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This anthology of wide-ranging essays by leading critics and artists addresses recent controversies in American public art. Prevailing issues focus on historical, symbolic, political, legal, and cultural concerns.

Politics of Nature


Author: Bruno Latour
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674039964
Category: Philosophy
Page: 307
View: 4939

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A major work by one of the more innovative thinkers of our time, Politics of Nature does nothing less than establish the conceptual context for political ecology--transplanting the terms of ecology into more fertile philosophical soil than its proponents have thus far envisioned. Bruno Latour announces his project dramatically: "Political ecology has nothing whatsoever to do with nature, this jumble of Greek philosophy, French Cartesianism and American parks." Nature, he asserts, far from being an obvious domain of reality, is a way of assembling political order without due process. Thus, his book proposes an end to the old dichotomy between nature and society--and the constitution, in its place, of a collective, a community incorporating humans and nonhumans and building on the experiences of the sciences as they are actually practiced. In a critique of the distinction between fact and value, Latour suggests a redescription of the type of political philosophy implicated in such a "commonsense" division--which here reveals itself as distinctly uncommonsensical and in fact fatal to democracy and to a healthy development of the sciences. Moving beyond the modernist institutions of "mononaturalism" and "multiculturalism," Latour develops the idea of "multinaturalism," a complex collectivity determined not by outside experts claiming absolute reason but by "diplomats" who are flexible and open to experimentation. Table of Contents: Introduction: What Is to Be Done with Political Ecology? 1. Why Political Ecology Has to Let Go of Nature First, Get Out of the Cave Ecological Crisis or Crisis of Objectivity? The End of Nature The Pitfall of "Social Representations" of Nature The Fragile Aid of Comparative Anthropology What Successor for the Bicameral Collective? 2. How to Bring the Collective Together Difficulties in Convoking the Collective First Division: Learning to Be Circumspect with Spokespersons Second Division: Associations of Humans and Nonhumans Third Division between Humans and Nonhumans: Reality and Recalcitrance A More or Less Articulated Collective The Return to Civil Peace 3. A New Separation of Powers Some Disadvantages of the Concepts of Fact and Value The Power to Take into Account and the Power to Put in Order The Collective's Two Powers of Representation Verifying That the Essential Guarantees Have Been Maintained A New Exteriority 4. Skills for the Collective The Third Nature and the Quarrel between the Two "Eco" Sciences Contribution of the Professions to the Procedures of the Houses The Work of the Houses The Common Dwelling, the Oikos 5. Exploring Common Worlds Time's Two Arrows The Learning Curve The Third Power and the Question of the State The Exercise of Diplomacy War and Peace for the Sciences Conclusion: What Is to Be Done? Political Ecology! Summary of the Argument (for Readers in a Hurry...) Glossary Notes Bibliography Index From the book: What is to be done with political ecology? Nothing. What is to be done? Political ecology! All those who have hoped that the politics of nature would bring about a renewal of public life have asked the first question, while noting the stagnation of the so-called "green" movements. They would like very much to know why so promising an endeavor has so often come to naught. Appearances notwithstanding, everyone is bound to answer the second question the same way. We have no choice: politics does not fall neatly on one side of a divide and nature on the other. From the time the term "politics" was invented, every type of politics has been defined by its relation to nature, whose every feature, property, and function depends on the polemical will to limit, reform, establish, short-circuit, or enlighten public life. As a result, we cannot choose whether to engage in it surreptitiously, by distinguishing between questions of nature and questions of politics, or explicitly, by treating those two sets of questions as a single issue that arises for all collectives. While the ecology movements tell us that nature is rapidly invading politics, we shall have to imagine - most often aligning ourselves with these movements but sometimes against them - what a politics finally freed from the sword of Damocles we call nature might be like.

The Phantom Public


Author: Walter Lippmann
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351477455
Category: Social Science
Page: 195
View: 5556

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In an era disgusted with politicians and the various instruments of "direct democracy," Walter Lippmann's The Phantom Public remains as relevant as ever. It reveals Lippmann at a time when he was most critical of the ills of American democracy. Antipopulist in sentiment, this volume defends elitism as a serious and distinctive intellectual option, one with considerable precursors in the American past. Lippmann's demythologized view of the American system of government resonates today.The Phantom Public discusses the "disenchanted man" who has become disillusioned not only with democracy, but also with reform. According to Lippmann, the average voter is incapable of governance; what is called the public is merely a "phantom." In terms of policy-making, the distinction should not be experts versus amateurs, but insiders versus outsiders. Lippmann challenges the core assumption of Progressive politics as well as any theory that pretends to leave political decision making in the hands of the people as a whole.In his biography Walter Lippmann and the American Century, Ronald Steel praised The Phantom Public as "one of Lippmann's most powerfully argued and revealing books. In it he came fully to terms with the inadequacy of traditional democratic theory." This volume is part of a continuing series on the major works of Walter Lippmann. As more and more Americans are inclined to become apathetic to the political system, this classic will be essential reading for students, teachers, and researchers of political science and history.

The Roots of Radicalism

Tradition, the Public Sphere, and Early Nineteenth-Century Social Movements
Author: Craig Calhoun
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 0226090841
Category: History
Page: 425
View: 6032

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This text reveals the importance of radicalism's links to pre-industrial culture and attachments to place and local communities, as well the ways in which journalists who had been pushed out of 'respectable' politics connected to artisans and other workers.

John Dewey and American Democracy


Author: Robert B. Westbrook
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 1501702033
Category: Philosophy
Page: 592
View: 5453

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Over a career spanning American history from the 1880s to the 1950s, John Dewey sought not only to forge a persuasive argument for his conviction that "democracy is freedom" but also to realize his democratic ideals through political activism. Widely considered modern America's most important philosopher, Dewey made his views known both through his writings and through such controversial episodes as his leadership of educational reform at the turn of the century; his support of American intervention in World War I and his leading role in the Outlawry of War movement after the war; and his participation in both radical and anti-communist politics in the 1930s and 40s. Robert B. Westbrook reconstructs the evolution of Dewey's thought and practice in this masterful intellectual biography, combining readings of his major works with an engaging account of key chapters in his activism. Westbrook pays particular attention to the impact upon Dewey of conversations and debates with contemporaries from William James and Reinhold Niebuhr to Jane Addams and Leon Trotsky. Countering prevailing interpretations of Dewey's contribution to the ideology of American liberalism, he discovers a more unorthodox Dewey—a deviant within the liberal community who was steadily radicalized by his profound faith in participatory democracy. Anyone concerned with the nature of democracy and the future of liberalism in America—including educators, moral and social philosophers, social scientists, political theorists, and intellectual and cultural historians—will find John Dewey and American Democracy indispensable reading.