The Political Economy of Sustainable Energy


Author: Catherine Mitchell
Publisher: Palgrave MacMillan
ISBN: N.A
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 236
View: 3010

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Mitchell analyses the extent to which the current political paradigm is capable of meeting the challenges of climate change. She argues that unless there are fundamental changes to policy-making, it is unlikely that energy policies will be able to deliver sufficient change to enable a move to a sustainable energy economy.

The Political Economy of Renewable Energy and Energy Security

Common Challenges and National Responses in Japan, China and Northern Europe
Author: E. Moe,P. Midford
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137338873
Category: Science
Page: 333
View: 6935

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Bringing together renewable energy and energy security, this book covers both the politics and political economy of renewables and energy security and analyzes renewable technologies in diverse and highly topical countries: Japan, China and Northern Europe.

The Political Economy of Clean Energy Transitions


Author: Douglas Arent,Channing Arndt,Mackay Miller,Owen Zinaman,Finn Tarp
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0198802242
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 640
View: 4369

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This is an open access title available under the terms of a CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 IGO licence. It is free to read at Oxford Scholarship Online and offered as a free PDF download from OUP and selected open access locations. A successful clean energy transition requires navigation of a variety of political and economic factors; in many respects, these factors are more formidable than the technical challenge of replacing fossil fuel infrastructure with lower carbontechnologies. The factors of political economy are present in all countries - developing and developed countries alike - all with a unique set of national circumstances, including entrenched political actorsand interests, established policies and goals, regulatory and market paradigms, and other aspects. As far as a clean energy transition is concerned, these factors are not to be taken lightly. As governments around the world pursue their greenhouse gas reduction goals, it is critical that they learn from one another both in terms of successes and failures. Advancing this process of knowledge-sharing, to the benefit of all, but especially the most vulnerable of present and future generations, isthe raison d'�tre of this book.

The Governance of Energy in China

Transition to a Low-Carbon Economy
Author: P. Andrews-Speed
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 113728403X
Category: Social Science
Page: 259
View: 7018

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The way in which energy is governed in China is driving its rising level of carbon dioxide emissions. This book analyses the nature of energy governance in China by combining ideas relating to transition management with institutionalist theories, which helps to identify factors which assist or constrain the country's path to a low-carbon economy.

Coastal Zone Management

A Study of the Political Economy of Sustainable Development
Author: Ramakrishnan Korakandy
Publisher: Gyan Publishing House
ISBN: 9788178353036
Category: Coastal zone management
Page: 303
View: 1055

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1. Introduction 2. Review of Literature 3. Coastal Zone Management-A ConceptualFramework 4. Rationale of Coastal Zone Management 5. Coastal Zone Management in Kerala-TheResource Base 6. Coastal Zone Management in Kerala-CoastalActivities

Living in a Low-Carbon Society in 2050


Author: H. Herring
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137264896
Category: Political Science
Page: 231
View: 2904

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Combining theory, case studies and speculative fiction, a range of contributors, from leading UK academics to pioneering renewable activists, create a compelling picture of the potential perks and pitfalls of a low carbon future.

Learning from Wind Power

Governance, Societal and Policy Perspectives on Sustainable Energy
Author: Joseph Szarka,Richard Cowell,Geraint Ellis,Peter A. Strachan,Charles Warren
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137265272
Category: Science
Page: 259
View: 9410

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Bringing together contributions from leading researchers, this volume reflects on the political, institutional and social factors that have shaped the recent expansion of wind energy, and to consider what lessons this experience may provide for the future expansion of other renewable technologies.

Energy, Policy, and the Environment

Modeling Sustainable Development for the North
Author: Marja Järvelä,Sirkku Juhola
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9781461403500
Category: Social Science
Page: 226
View: 3458

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This book sets the questions of energy and the environment in the North in the global context and further addresses historical developments, views on energy taxation and tariffs, and effects of EU energy policy. Climate change appears more frequently than ever on the top of global and national policy agendas. In the current situation traditional environmental concern and environmental policy may not suffice in the face of the global challenge as manifested by climate change and the depletion of fossil energy resources. But as new data comes to light, new energy policies and changes in economic structures are crucial for putting into action global climate policy. Crucial tasks in environmental policy are the sustainable utilisation of natural resources and the conservation of natural and human-made habitats. One of the areas of the world where this comes into play the most is in the Nordic countries. Northern societies are predominantly high tech, high consumption and high energy supply societies. And with the transition from older energy sources (wood for heating and stream water for power production) to newer ones (oil and nuclear energy) discussions on the environmental impact have led to public and corporate action. The Northern countries have been at the forefront in finding sustainable alternatives to solve conflicts arising from the rise in energy needs. However, these countries have taken different pathways with different policies in attempting to achieve this. As the needs and concerns from climate change arise, a Northern dimension, involving policies that contrast to European and global trends, emerges. Energy, Policy, and the Environment: Modeling Sustainable Development for the North explores that dimension.

The Energy Security-Climate Nexus

Institutional Change in the UK and Beyond
Author: C. Kuzemko
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137307838
Category: Political Science
Page: 243
View: 6410

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In the advent of important crises of both climate change and energy supply (in)security, questions are being asked about changes in energy governance. Caroline Kuzemko explains how and why change takes place and discusses the convoluted UK energy governance system that has emerged between 2000 and the present day. She applies a complex theoretical approach based on new institutional concepts of policy paradigm change, but which also utilises concepts of (de)politicisation and securitization. UK energy governance, like energy policy elsewhere, is moving from one heavily influenced by neoliberal economic ideas to one where state intervention is more commonplace. Moreover, the new governance system is informed not by one but by multiple perspectives on energy and governance geopolitical, climate change and pro-market.

Dynamics of Energy Governance in Europe and Russia


Author: C. Kuzemko,A. Belyi,A. Goldthau,M. Keating
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 0230370942
Category: Political Science
Page: 292
View: 1580

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Energy in Europe and Russia is in flux. This book presents a rich set of case studies for analyzing the complex and intertwined regional dynamics of multiple actors, levels, and policy fields in energy throughout Europe and Russia, with the aim of offering an alternative view to the prevalent geopolitical or neoliberal approaches.

The Political Economy of the Low-Carbon Transition

Pathways Beyond Techno-Optimism
Author: Peadar Kirby,Tadhg O’Mahony
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319625543
Category: Political Science
Page: 303
View: 880

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This book addresses the global need to transition to a low-carbon society and economy by 2050. The authors interrogate the dominant frames used for understanding this challenge and the predominant policy approaches for achieving it. Highlighting the techno-optimism that informs our current understanding and policy options, Kirby and O’Mahony draw on the lessons of international development to situate the transition within a political economy framework. Assisted by thinking on future scenarios, they critically examine the range of pathways being implemented by both developed and developing countries, identifying the prevailing forms of climate capitalism led by technology. Based on evidence that this is inadequate to achieve a low-carbon and sustainable society, the authors identify an alternative approach. This advance emerges from community initiatives, discussions on postcapitalism and debates about wellbeing and degrowth. The re-positioning of society and environment at the core of development can be labelled “ecosocialism” – a concept which must be tempered against the conditions created by Trumpism and Brexit.

Trade Unions in the Green Economy

Working for the Environment
Author: Nora Räthzel,David Uzzell
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1849714649
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 266
View: 2836

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Combating climate change will increasingly impact on production industries and the workers they employ as production changes and consumption is targeted. Yet research has largely ignored labour and its responses. This book brings together sociologists, psychologists, political scientists, historians, economists, and representatives from international and local unions based in Australia, Brazil, South Africa, Taiwan, Spain, Sweden, the UK and the USA. Together they open up a new area of research: Environmental Labour Studies. The authors ask what kind of environmental policies are unions in different countries and sectors developing. How do they aim to reconcile the protection of jobs with the protection of the environment? What are the forms of cooperation developing between trade unions and environmental movements, especially the so-called Red-Green alliances? Under what conditions are unions striving to create climate change policies that transcend the economic system? Where are they trying to find solutions that they see as possible within the present socio-economic conditions? What are the theoretical and practical implications of trade unions' "Just Transition", and the problems and perspectives of "Green Jobs"? The authors also explore how food workers' rights would contribute to low carbon agriculture, the role workers' identities play in union climate change policies, and the difficulties of creating solidarity between unions across the global North and South. Trade Unions in the Green Economy opens the climate change debate to academics and trade unionists from a range of disciplines in the fields of labour studies, environmental politics, environmental management, and climate change policy. It will also be useful for environmental organisations, trade unions, business, and politicians.

The Political Economy of Climate Change Adaptation


Author: Benjamin Sovacool,Björn-Ola Linnér
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137496738
Category: Political Science
Page: 226
View: 9907

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Drawing on concepts in political economy, political ecology, justice theory, and critical development studies, the authors offer the first comprehensive, systematic exploration of the ways in which adaptation projects can produce unintended, undesirable results.

The Growth of Biofuels in the 21st Century

Policy Drivers and Market Challenges
Author: R. Ackrill,A. Kay
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137307897
Category: Science
Page: 250
View: 4773

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This book provides a timely and insightful analysis of the expansion of biofuels production and use in recent years. Drawing on interviews with key policy insiders, Ackrill and Kay show how biofuels policies have been motivated by concerns over climate change, energy security and rural development.

Renewable Energy Transformation or Fossil Fuel Backlash

Vested Interests in the Political Economy
Author: Espen Moe
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137298790
Category: Political Science
Page: 291
View: 1053

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Renewable energy is rising within an energy system dominated by powerful vested energy interests in fossil fuels, nuclear and electric utilities. Analyzing renewables in six very different countries, the author argues that it is the extent to which states have controlled these vested interests that determines the success or failure of renewables.

Keeping Cool in Southeast Asia

Energy Consumption and Urban Air-Conditioning
Author: M. Sahakian
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137308834
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 237
View: 5917

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Against the backdrop of the environmental impact of household electricity consumption and the history of cooling practices, Marlyne Sahakian considers how people keep cool, from Metro Manila to other mega-cities in Southeast Asia.

The Oxford Handbook of the Macroeconomics of Global Warming


Author: Lucas Bernard,Willi Semmler
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190204192
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 560
View: 9490

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The first World Climate Conference, which was sponsored by the World Meteorological Organization in Genève in 1979, triggered an international dialogue on global warming. From the 1997 United Nations-sponsored conference-during which the Kyoto Protocol was signed-through meetings in Copenhagen, Cancún, Durban, and most recently Doha (2012) and Warsaw (2013), worldwide attention to the issue of global warming and its impact on the world's economy has rapidly increased in intensity. The consensus of these debates and discussions, however, is less than clear. Optimistically, many geoscience researchers and members of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) have supported CO2 emission reduction pledges while maintaining that a 2°C limit in increased temperature by the year 2100 is achievable through international coordination. Other observers postulate that established CO2 reduction commitments such as those agreed to at the Copenhagen United Nations Climate Change Conference (2009) are insufficient and cannot hold the global warming increase below 2°C. As experts theorize on precisely what impact global warming will have, developing nations have become particularly alarmed. The developed world will use energy to mitigate global warming effects, but developing countries are more exposed by geography and poverty to the most dangerous consequences of a global temperature rise and lack the economic means to adapt. The complex dynamics that result from this confluence of science and geopolitics gives rise to even more complicated issues for economists, financial planners, business leaders, and policy-makers. The Oxford Handbook of the Macroeconomics of Global Warming analyzes the economic impact of issues related to and resulting from global warming, specifically the implications of possible preventative measures, various policy changes, and adaptation efforts as well as the different consequences climate change will have on both developing and developed nations. This multi-disciplinary approach, which touches on issues of growth, employment, and development, elucidates for readers state-of-the-art research on the complex and far-reaching problem of global warming.

The Politics of the Environment

Ideas, Activism, Policy
Author: Neil Carter
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1108472303
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 455
View: 4218

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Revised to include new discussions on climate justice, green political parties, climate legislation and recent environmental struggles.

The Political Economy of Low Carbon Transformation

Breaking the habits of capitalism
Author: Harold Wilhite
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317596374
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 136
View: 2026

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Deep reductions in energy use and carbon emissions will not be possible within political economies that are driven by the capitalist imperatives of growth, commodification and individualization. As such, it has now become necessary to understand the relationship between capitalism and the emergence of high energy habits. Using the examples of home energy, transport and food, The Political Economy of Low Carbon Transformation articulates the relationship between the politics of economic expansion and the formation of high-energy habits at the level of family and household. The book elaborates a theory of habit and how it can contribute to this relationship. It critiques mainstream green economy and green energy prescriptions for low carbon transformation that take economic growth for granted and ignore habits formed in a material world designed and built for high energy use. The book explores the growing number of communities around the world that are engaged in collaborative efforts to reform their community and household habits in ways that are less environmentally intrusive. It assesses their potential to make an impact on national and urban low carbon political agendas. The book is aimed at a large and growing interdisciplinary audience interested in the relationship between political economy, consumption and sustainability.

The Global Energy Challenge

Environment, Development and Security
Author: Caroline Kuzemko,Michael F. Keating,Andreas Goldthau
Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education
ISBN: 1137410086
Category: Political Science
Page: 264
View: 5325

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The supply and demand of energy, its security and environmental sustainability are increasingly central issues in the contemporary world. This broad-ranging new text provides an international and interdisciplinary introduction to today's political, economic, security, policy and technological challenges set in a clear historical context.