The People's Tycoon

Henry Ford and the American Century
Author: Steven Watts
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 9780307558978
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 656
View: 9570

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How a Michigan farm boy became the richest man in America is a classic, almost mythic tale, but never before has Henry Ford’s outsized genius been brought to life so vividly as it is in this engaging and superbly researched biography. The real Henry Ford was a tangle of contradictions. He set off the consumer revolution by producing a car affordable to the masses, all the while lamenting the moral toll exacted by consumerism. He believed in giving his workers a living wage, though he was entirely opposed to union labor. He had a warm and loving relationship with his wife, but sired a son with another woman. A rabid anti-Semite, he nonetheless embraced African American workers in the era of Jim Crow. Uncovering the man behind the myth, situating his achievements and their attendant controversies firmly within the context of early twentieth-century America, Watts has given us a comprehensive, illuminating, and fascinating biography of one of America’s first mass-culture celebrities. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The People's Tycoon

Henry Ford And the American Century
Author: Steven Watts
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0375707255
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 614
View: 3071

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A biography of the controversial entrepreneur who transformed the world of American business explores the contradictions of Henry Ford's life and assesses his accomplishments within the context of early tewntieth-century America.

The People's Tycoon

Henry Ford and the American Century
Author: Steven Watts
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0375707255
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 614
View: 8585

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A biography of the controversial entrepreneur who transformed the world of American business explores the contradictions of Henry Ford's life and assesses his accomplishments within the context of early tewntieth-century America.

I Invented the Modern Age

The Rise of Henry Ford
Author: Richard Snow
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1451645570
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 364
View: 4871

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A lively account of Henry Ford's invention of the Model-T places his innovations against a backdrop of a steam-powered world and offers insight into his innate mechanical talents and pioneering work in internal combustion, describing his indelible impact on American culture and the perplexing subsequent changes in his personality.

Henry Ford


Author: Vincent Curcio
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0195316924
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 306
View: 7632

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A compact, lively biography of Henry Ford, the brilliant businessman and icon of American modernity whose towering ego and anti-Semitism complicate his legacy.

Henry Ford

An Interpretation
Author: Samuel S. Marquis
Publisher: Wayne State University Press
ISBN: 9780814335376
Category: History
Page: 248
View: 9269

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A reprint of the rare and controversial biography of Henry Ford, first published in 1923, written by Ford’s close associate.

Self-help Messiah

Dale Carnegie and Success in Modern America
Author: Steven Watts
Publisher: Other Press, LLC
ISBN: 159051503X
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 544
View: 1263

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An illuminating biography of the man who taught Americans “how to win friends and influence people” Before Stephen Covey, Oprah Winfrey, and Malcolm Gladwell there was Dale Carnegie. His book, How to Win Friends and Influence People, became a best seller worldwide, and Life magazine named him one of “the most important Americans of the twentieth century.” This is the first full-scale biography of this influential figure. Dale Carnegie was born in rural Missouri, his father a poor farmer, his mother a successful preacher. To make ends meet he tried his hand at various sales jobs, and his failure to convince his customers to buy what he had to offer eventually became the fuel behind his future glory. Carnegie quickly figured out that something was amiss in American education and in the ways businesspeople related to each other. What he discovered was as simple as it was profound: Understanding people’s needs and desires is paramount in any successful enterprise. Carnegie conceived his book to help people learn to relate to one another and enrich their lives through effective communication. His success was extraordinary, so hungry was 1920s America for a little psychological insight that was easy to apply to everyday affairs. Self-help Messiah tells the story of Carnegie’s personal journey and how it gave rise to the movement of self-help and personal reinvention.

Fordlandia

The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford's Forgotten Jungle City
Author: Greg Grandin
Publisher: Metropolitan Books
ISBN: 9781429938013
Category: History
Page: 432
View: 8368

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The stunning, never before told story of the quixotic attempt to recreate small-town America in the heart of the Amazon In 1927, Henry Ford, the richest man in the world, bought a tract of land twice the size of Delaware in the Brazilian Amazon. His intention was to grow rubber, but the project rapidly evolved into a more ambitious bid to export America itself, along with its golf courses, ice-cream shops, bandstands, indoor plumbing, and Model Ts rolling down broad streets. Fordlandia, as the settlement was called, quickly became the site of an epic clash. On one side was the car magnate, lean, austere, the man who reduced industrial production to its simplest motions; on the other, the Amazon, lush, extravagant, the most complex ecological system on the planet. Ford's early success in imposing time clocks and square dances on the jungle soon collapsed, as indigenous workers, rejecting his midwestern Puritanism, turned the place into a ribald tropical boomtown. Fordlandia's eventual demise as a rubber plantation foreshadowed the practices that today are laying waste to the rain forest. More than a parable of one man's arrogant attempt to force his will on the natural world, Fordlandia depicts a desperate quest to salvage the bygone America that the Ford factory system did much to dispatch. As Greg Grandin shows in this gripping and mordantly observed history, Ford's great delusion was not that the Amazon could be tamed but that the forces of capitalism, once released, might yet be contained. Fordlandia is a 2009 National Book Award Finalist for Nonfiction.

Young Henry Ford

A Picture History of the First Forty Years
Author: Sidney Olson
Publisher: Wayne State University Press
ISBN: 0814339956
Category: Transportation
Page: 208
View: 7655

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Young Henry Ford is a visual and textual presentation of the first forty years of Henry Ford—an American farm boy who became one of the greatest manufacturers of modern times and profoundly impacted the habits of American life. In Young Henry Ford, Sidney Olson dispels some of the myths attached to this automobile legend, going beyond the Henry Ford of mass production and the five-dollar day, and offers a more intimate understanding of Henry Ford and the time he lived in. Through hundreds of restored photographs, including some of Ford's own taken with his first camera, Young Henry Ford revisits an America now gone—of long days on the farm, travel by horse and buggy, and one-room schoolhouses. Some of the rare illustrations include the first picture of Henry Ford, photos from Edsel's childhood, snapshots of the interior and exterior of the Ford homestead, Clara and Henry's wedding invitation, and photos of the early stages of the first automobile.

Henry and Edsel

the creation of the Ford Empire
Author: Richard Bak
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons Inc
ISBN: N.A
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 313
View: 3798

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A new perspective on the Ford Motor empire chronicles the story of father and founder, Henry Ford, his gifted son Edsel Ford, and the "second son," the menacing Harry Bennet, and their family conflicts, resulting in the company's ultimate rise and survival in the twentieth century.

Who Was Henry Ford? - Biography Books for Kids 9-12 | Children's Biography Books


Author: Baby Professor
Publisher: Speedy Publishing LLC
ISBN: 1541919920
Category: Young Adult Fiction
Page: 64
View: 4742

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Your family probably owns a Ford, but do you know the man who first created the Ford? He is Henry Ford and you will know about his life if you read this interesting biography book for kids 9-12. Reading about the life story of successful individuals will rekindle your passion and interests in certain subjects. Be inspired. Read this book today!

Drive!

Henry Ford, George Selden, and the Race to Invent the Auto Age
Author: Lawrence Goldstone
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 0553394185
Category: BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY
Page: 372
View: 2908

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"Ask nearly anyone what Henry Ford invented and they'll give you two answers- the automobile and the assembly line. The truth is that he invented neither. Here, acclaimed historian Lawrence Goldstone rewrites the birth of the automobile and gives credit where it's long been due. Revelatory and captivating, Drive! features the innovators, entrepreneurs, and daredevils who steered the automobile through its wild early days--from Karl Benz and Marcel Renault to Ransom Olds and the Dodge brothers to Camille du Gast and Barney Oldfield to the man, forgotten by history, who actually held the original patent on the technology at the heart of it all--and along the way teaches invaluable business lessons."

JFK and the Masculine Mystique

Sex and Power on the New Frontier
Author: Steven Watts
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 1250049989
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 432
View: 9304

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From very early on in his career, John F. Kennedy’s allure was more akin to a movie star than a presidential candidate. Why were Americans so attracted to Kennedy in the late 1950s and early 1960s—his glamorous image, good looks, cool style, tough-minded rhetoric, and sex appeal? As Steve Watts argues, JFK was tailor made for the cultural atmosphere of his time. He benefited from a crisis of manhood that had welled up in postwar America when men had become ensnared by bureaucracy, softened by suburban comfort, and emasculated by a generation of newly-aggressive women. Kennedy appeared to revive the modern American man as youthful and vigorous, masculine and athletic, and a sexual conquistador. His cultural crusade involved other prominent figures, including Frank Sinatra, Norman Mailer, Ian Fleming, Hugh Hefner, Ben Bradlee, Kirk Douglas, and Tony Curtis, who collectively symbolized masculine regeneration. JFK and the Masculine Mystique is not just another standard biography of the youthful president. By examining Kennedy in the context of certain books, movies, social critiques, music, and cultural discussions that framed his ascendancy, Watts shows us the excitement and sense of possibility, the optimism and aspirations, that accompanied the dawn of a new age in America.

American Icon

Alan Mulally and the Fight to Save Ford Motor Company
Author: Bryce G. Hoffman
Publisher: Crown Business
ISBN: 0307886069
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 422
View: 8156

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THE INSIDE STORY OF THE EPIC TURNAROUND OF FORD MOTOR COMPANY UNDER THE LEADERSHIP OF CEO ALAN MULALLY. At the end of 2008, Ford Motor Company was just months away from running out of cash. With the auto industry careening toward ruin, Congress offered all three Detroit automakers a bailout. General Motors and Chrysler grabbed the taxpayer lifeline, but Ford decided to save itself. Under the leadership of charismatic CEO Alan Mulally, Ford had already put together a bold plan to unify its divided global operations, transform its lackluster product lineup, and overcome a dys­functional culture of infighting, backstabbing, and excuses. It was an extraordinary risk, but it was the only way the Ford family—America's last great industrial dynasty—could hold on to their company. Mulally and his team pulled off one of the great­est comebacks in business history. As the rest of Detroit collapsed, Ford went from the brink of bankruptcy to being the most profitable automaker in the world. American Icon is the compelling, behind-the-scenes account of that epic turnaround. On the verge of collapse, Ford went outside the auto industry and recruited Mulally—the man who had already saved Boeing from the deathblow of 9/11—to lead a sweeping restructuring of a company that had been unable to overcome decades of mismanage­ment and denial. Mulally applied the principles he developed at Boeing to streamline Ford's inefficient operations, force its fractious executives to work together as a team, and spark a product renaissance in Dearborn. He also convinced the United Auto Workers to join his fight for the soul of American manufacturing. Bryce Hoffman reveals the untold story of the covert meetings with UAW leaders that led to a game-changing contract, Bill Ford's battle to hold the Ford family together when many were ready to cash in their stock and write off the company, and the secret alliance with Toyota and Honda that helped prop up the Amer­ican automotive supply base. In one of the great management narratives of our time, Hoffman puts the reader inside the boardroom as Mulally uses his celebrated Business Plan Review meet­ings to drive change and force Ford to deal with the painful realities of the American auto industry. Hoffman was granted unprecedented access to Ford's top executives and top-secret company documents. He spent countless hours with Alan Mulally, Bill Ford, the Ford family, former executives, labor leaders, and company directors. In the bestselling tradition of Too Big to Fail and The Big Short, American Icon is narrative nonfiction at its vivid and colorful best.

The Republic Reborn

War and the Making of Liberal America, 1790-1820
Author: Steven Watts
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 9780801839412
Category: History
Page: 406
View: 7155

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Edison As I Know Him


Author: Henry Ford,Samuel Crowther
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781258856342
Category:
Page: 140
View: 5101

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This is a new release of the original 1930 edition.

The First Tycoon


Author: T.J. Stiles
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 9780307271556
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 752
View: 514

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NATIONAL BESTSELLER WINNER OF THE NATIONAL BOOK AWARD In this groundbreaking biography, T.J. Stiles tells the dramatic story of Cornelius “Commodore” Vanderbilt, the combative man and American icon who, through his genius and force of will, did more than perhaps any other individual to create modern capitalism. Meticulously researched and elegantly written, The First Tycoon describes an improbable life, from Vanderbilt’s humble birth during the presidency of George Washington to his death as one of the richest men in American history. In between we see how the Commodore helped to launch the transportation revolution, propel the Gold Rush, reshape Manhattan, and invent the modern corporation. Epic in its scope and success, the life of Vanderbilt is also the story of the rise of America itself. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Andrew Carnegie


Author: David Nasaw
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9780143112440
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 878
View: 3064

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Chronicles the life of the iconic business titan from his modest upbringing in mid-1800s Scotland through his rise to one of the world's richest men, offering insight into his work as a peace advocate and his motivations for giving away most of his fortune.

Titan

The Life of John D. Rockefeller, Sr.
Author: Ron Chernow
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 9780307429773
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 832
View: 9797

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National Book Critics Circle Award Finalist From the acclaimed, award-winning author of Alexander Hamilton: here is the essential, endlessly engrossing biography of John D. Rockefeller, Sr.—the Jekyll-and-Hyde of American capitalism. In the course of his nearly 98 years, Rockefeller was known as both a rapacious robber baron, whose Standard Oil Company rode roughshod over an industry, and a philanthropist who donated money lavishly to universities and medical centers. He was the terror of his competitors, the bogeyman of reformers, the delight of caricaturists—and an utter enigma. Drawing on unprecedented access to Rockefeller’s private papers, Chernow reconstructs his subjects’ troubled origins (his father was a swindler and a bigamist) and his single-minded pursuit of wealth. But he also uncovers the profound religiosity that drove him “to give all I could”; his devotion to his father; and the wry sense of humor that made him the country’s most colorful codger. Titan is a magnificent biography—balanced, revelatory, elegantly written.