The Oxford History of Byzantium


Author: Cyril Mango
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191500828
Category: History
Page: 352
View: 2354

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The Oxford History of Byzantium is the only history to provide in concise form detailed coverage of Byzantium from its Roman beginnings to the fall of Constantinople and assimilation into the Turkish Empire. Lively essays and beautiful illustrations portray the emergence and development of a distinctive civilization, covering the period from the fourth century to the mid-fifteenth century. The authors - all working at the cutting edge of their particular fields - outline the political history of the Byzantine state and bring to life the evolution of a colourful culture. In AD 324, the Emperor Constantine the Great chose Byzantion, an ancient Greek colony at the mouth of the Thracian Bosphorous, as his imperial residence. He renamed the place 'Constaninopolis nova Roma', 'Constantinople, the new Rome' and the city (modern Istanbul) became the Eastern capital of the later Roman empire. The new Rome outlived the old and Constantine's successors continued to regard themselves as the legitimate emperors of Rome, just as their subjects called themselves Romaioi, or Romans long after they had forgotten the Latin language. In the sixteenth century, Western humanists gave this eastern Roman empire ruled from Constantinople the epithet 'Byzantine'. Against a backdrop of stories of emperors, intrigues, battles, and bishops, this Oxford History uncovers the hidden mechanisms - economic, social, and demographic - that underlay the history of events. The authors explore everyday life in cities and villages, manufacture and trade, machinery of government, the church as an instrument of state, minorities, education, literary activity, beliefs and superstitions, monasticism, iconoclasm, the rise of Islam, and the fusion with Western, or Latin, culture. Byzantium linked the ancient and modern worlds, shaping traditions and handing down to both Eastern and Western civilization a vibrant legacy.

The Oxford Handbook of Byzantine Studies


Author: Elizabeth Jeffreys,John F. Haldon,Robin Cormack
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780199252466
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 1021
View: 2820

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The Handbook contains eighty-nine articles by leading experts on all significant aspects of the diverse and fast-growing field of Byzantine Studies, which deals with the history and culture of the Byzantine Empire, the eastern half of the Late Roman Empire, from the fourth to the fourteenth century.

The Social History of Byzantium


Author: John Haldon
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1119344603
Category: History
Page: 328
View: 2089

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With original essays by leading scholars, this book explores the social history of the medieval eastern Roman Empire and offers illuminating new insights into our knowledge of Byzantine society. Provides interconnected essays of original scholarship relating to the social history of the Byzantine empire Offers groundbreaking theoretical and empirical research in the study of Byzantine society Includes helpful glossaries of sociological/theoretical terms and Byzantine/medieval terms

A History of Byzantium


Author: Timothy E. Gregory
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 140518471X
Category: History
Page: 455
View: 2375

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This introduction to the Byzantine civilisation provides a guide for those who know nothing or little about the history of Byzantium. Spanning a vast period from the Emperor Constantine in AD 306 to the fall of Constantinople in 1453, the book is structured around a chronological political history although social, economic and cultural issues are addressed throughout. More detailed studies of particular people, events or issues are dealt with in 53 `boxes'. The main alterations in the second edition involve giving greater space to social and economic themes, including more localised case studies and more on archaeological evidence. An excellent well-written study which will be useful and interesting to students and those who like to read about medieval history.

The Oxford History of Historical Writing

Volume 2: 400-1400
Author: Sarah Foot,Chase F. Robinson
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191636932
Category: History
Page: 672
View: 4157

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How was history written in Europe and Asia between 400-1400? How was the past understood in religious, social and political terms? And in what ways does the diversity of historical writing in this period mask underlying commonalities in narrating the past? The volume, which assembles 28 contributions from leading historians, tackles these and other questions. Part I provides comprehensive overviews of the development of historical writing in societies that range from the Korean Peninsula to north-west Europe, which together highlight regional and cultural distinctiveness. Part II complements the first part by taking a thematic and comparative approach; it includes essays on genre, warfare, and religion (amongst others) which address common concerns of historians working in this liminal period before the globalizing forces of the early modern world.

The Oxford Illustrated History of Medieval Europe


Author: George Holmes
Publisher: Oxford Illustrated History
ISBN: 9780192854353
Category: History
Page: 398
View: 5033

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'The individual chapters are scholarly and up to the minute, without loss of accessibility or pace. The illustrations are many, apposite and refreshingly unhackneyed.' -Times Literary Supplement

The Oxford History of Greece and the Hellenistic World


Author: John Boardman,Jasper Griffin,Oswyn Murray
Publisher: Oxford Paperbacks
ISBN: 0191500623
Category: History
Page: 528
View: 9334

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A comprehensive view of the ancient Greek world, its history and its achievements. The legacy of the Hellenistic world is vast--it ranges from architecture to philosophy, literature, and the visual arts to military strategy and science. This authoritative study covers the period from the eighth century BC, which witnessed the emergence of the Greek city-states, to the conquests of Alexander the Great and the establishment of the Greek monarchies some five centuries later. Chapters dealing with political and social history are interspersed with chapters on philosophy and the arts, including Homer, Greek myth, Aristotle, and Plato, Greek dramatists such as Sophocles and Aristophanes, and the flourishing of the visual and plastic arts. This volume, first published as part of The Oxford History of the Classical World, includes illustrations, maps, a Chronology of Events, and suggestions for Further Reading.

The Oxford History of the Biblical World


Author: Michael David Coogan
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0195139372
Category: Religion
Page: 487
View: 4151

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Examines the history, art, architecture, languages, literatures, society, and religion of Biblical Israel and early Judaism and Christianity

The Oxford Handbook of Late Antiquity


Author: Scott Johnson
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019027753X
Category: Byzantine Empire
Page: 1296
View: 720

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The Oxford Handbook of Late Antiquity offers an innovative overview of a period (c. 300-700 CE) that has become increasingly central to scholarly debates over the history of western and Middle Eastern civilizations. This volume covers such pivotal events as the fall of Rome, the rise of Christianity, the origins of Islam, and the early formation of Byzantium and the European Middle Ages. These events are set in the context of widespread literary, artistic, cultural, and religious change during the period. The geographical scope of this Handbook is unparalleled among comparable surveys of Late Antiquity; Arabia, Egypt, Central Asia, and the Balkans all receive dedicated treatments, while the scope extends to the western kingdoms, and North Africa in the West. Furthermore, from economic theory and slavery to Greek and Latin poetry, Syriac and Coptic literature, sites of religious devotion, and many others, this Handbook covers a wide range of topics that will appeal to scholars from a diverse array of disciplines. The Oxford Handbook of Late Antiquity engages the perennially valuable questions about the end of the ancient world and the beginning of the medieval, while providing a much-needed touchstone for the study of Late Antiquity itself.

The Byzantines


Author: Averil Cameron
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1405178248
Category: History
Page: 296
View: 8908

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Winner of the 2006 John D. Criticos Prize This book introduces the reader to the complex history, ethnicity, and identity of the Byzantines. This volume brings Byzantium – often misconstrued as a vanished successor to the classical world – to the forefront of European history Deconstructs stereotypes surrounding Byzantium Beautifully illustrated with photographs and maps

Licht aus dem Osten

Eine neue Geschichte der Welt
Author: Peter Frankopan
Publisher: Rowohlt Verlag GmbH
ISBN: 3644122814
Category: History
Page: 944
View: 3327

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«‹Eine neue Geschichte der Welt› – dieses Buch verdient den Titel voll und ganz.» Peter Frankopan lehrt uns, die Geschichte neu zu sehen – indem er nicht Europa, sondern den Nahen und Mittleren Osten zum Ausgangspunkt macht. Hier entstanden die ersten Hochkulturen und alle drei monotheistischen Weltreligionen; ein Reichtum an Gütern, Kultur und Wissen, der das Alte Europa seit jeher sehnsüchtig nach Osten blicken ließ. Frankopan erzählt von Alexander dem Großen, der Babylon zur Hauptstadt seines neuen Weltreichs machen wollte; von Seide, Porzellan und Techniken wie der Papierherstellung, die über die Handelswege der Region Verbreitung fanden; vom Sklavenhandel mit der islamischen Welt, der Venedig im Mittelalter zum Aufstieg verhalf; von islamischen Gelehrten, die das antike Kulturerbe pflegten, lange bevor Europa die Renaissance erlebte; von der Erschließung der Rohstoffe im 19. Jahrhundert bis hin zum Nahostkonflikt. Schließlich erklärt Frankopan, warum sich die Weltpolitik noch heute in Staaten wie Syrien, Afghanistan und Irak entscheidet. Peter Frankopan schlägt einen weiten Bogen, und das nicht nur zeitlich: Er rückt zwei Welten zusammen, Orient und Okzident, die historisch viel enger miteinander verbunden sind, als wir glauben. Ein so fundiertes wie packend erzähltes Geschichtswerk, das wahrhaft die Augen öffnet.

Byzantium

A Very Short Introduction
Author: Peter Sarris
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0199236119
Category: History
Page: 142
View: 9008

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Explores the fusion of Roman political culture, Greek intellectual tradition, and Christian faith that characterized Byzantium. Shows how the empire held power for eleven centuries and why it ultimately fell.

The Making of Byzantium, 600-1025


Author: Mark Whittow
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520204966
Category: History
Page: 477
View: 3121

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Mark Whittow presents a clear, up-to-date reassessment of the Byzantine empire during a crucial phase in the history of the Near East. Against a geopolitical background (superbly illustrated with fourteen maps), his book covers the last decade of the Roman empire as a superpower, the catastrophic crisis of the seventh century, and the means whereby the embattled Byzantine empire hung on in Constantinople and Asia Minor until the Abbasid Caliphate's decline opened up new perspectives for Christian power in the Near East. A special feature is Whittow's coverage of Byzantium's neighbors, allies, and enemies in Europe and Asia. He stresses the geographical context of events, often overlooked in other accounts of this period. The origins of Russia, relations with the nomad powers of the steppe world, the competition between Bulgars, Romans, and Slavs in the Balkans, and the frequently ignored region of the Transcaucasus are all given extended treatment. No such wide-ranging work has appeared in English for nearly 30 years, and Whittow's book will be invaluable for all scholars, students, and enthusiasts of medieval history. Mark Whittow presents a clear, up-to-date reassessment of the Byzantine empire during a crucial phase in the history of the Near East. Against a geopolitical background (superbly illustrated with fourteen maps), his book covers the last decade of the Roman empire as a superpower, the catastrophic crisis of the seventh century, and the means whereby the embattled Byzantine empire hung on in Constantinople and Asia Minor until the Abbasid Caliphate's decline opened up new perspectives for Christian power in the Near East. A special feature is Whittow's coverage of Byzantium's neighbors, allies, and enemies in Europe and Asia. He stresses the geographical context of events, often overlooked in other accounts of this period. The origins of Russia, relations with the nomad powers of the steppe world, the competition between Bulgars, Romans, and Slavs in the Balkans, and the frequently ignored region of the Transcaucasus are all given extended treatment. No such wide-ranging work has appeared in English for nearly 30 years, and Whittow's book will be invaluable for all scholars, students, and enthusiasts of medieval history.

The Orthodox Church in the Byzantine Empire


Author: J. M. Hussey
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191614882
Category: Religion
Page: 456
View: 6200

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This book describes the role of the medieval Orthodox Church in the Byzantine Empire (c.600-c.1453). As an integral part of its policy it was (as in western Christianity) closely linked with many aspects of everyday life both official and otherwise. It was a formative period for Orthodoxy. It had to face doctrinal problems and heresies; at the same time it experienced the continuity and deepening of its liturgical life. While holding fast to the traditions of the fathers and the councils, it saw certain developments in doctrine and liturgy as also in administration. Part I discusses the landmarks in ecclesiastical affairs within the Empire as well as the creative influence exercised on the Slavs and the increasing contacts with westerners particularly after 1204. Part II gives a brief account of the structure of the medieval Orthodox Church, its officials and organization, and the spirituality of laity, monks, and clergy.

The History of Byzantine and Eastern Canon Law to 1500


Author: Wilfried Hartmann,Kenneth Pennington
Publisher: CUA Press
ISBN: 0813216796
Category: History
Page: 356
View: 331

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Wilfried Hartmann is emeritus professor of the medieval history of canon law at the University of Tbingen. Kenneth Pennington is Kelly-Quinn Professor of Ecclesiastical and Legal History at The Catholic University of America. He is the author of numerous works including Pope and Bishops: The Papal Monarchy in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries and The Prince and the Law, 1200-1600: Sovereignty and Rights in the Western Legal Tradition. Hartmann and Pennington are coeditors of the History of Medieval Canon Law series.