The Ottoman Kitchen


Author: Sarah Woodward
Publisher: Conran Octopus
ISBN: N.A
Category: Cooking
Page: 144
View: 782

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The Ottomans elaborated and refined the culinary traditions of the entire Eastern Mediterranean region to create a cuisine that is considered one of the world's greatest and most eclectic. This book explores this tradition, offering a collection of practical recipes for up-to-date versions of classic dishes. 100+ color photos.

Ottoman Cuisine

A Rich Culinary Tradition
Author: Omur Akkor
Publisher: Blue Dome Press
ISBN: 1935295667
Category: Cooking
Page: 97
View: 1021

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Going all the way back to earliest Ottoman cookbooks, chef M. Omur Akkor has collected a rich sampling of Ottoman meals. These recipes, taken from great chefs of the Ottoman's great palaces and from the ordinary kitchens of Ottoman homes, provide a delicious introduction to the kind of cuisines that united one of the greatest empires in history. Part history lesson, part cookbook, Ottoman Cuisine brings history alive—in your kitchen!

Bountiful Empire

A History of Ottoman Cuisine
Author: Priscilla Mary Isin
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781780239040
Category: Cooking, Turkish
Page: 280
View: 3228

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The Ottoman Empire was one of the largest and longest-lasting empires in history--and one of the most culinarily inclined. In this powerful and complex concoction of politics, culture, and cuisine, the production and consumption of food reflected the lives of the empire's citizens from sultans to soldiers. Food bound people of different classes and backgrounds together, defining identity and serving symbolic functions in the social, religious, political, and military spheres. In Bountiful Empire, Priscilla Mary Işın examines the changing meanings of the Ottoman Empire's foodways as they evolved over more than five centuries. Işın begins with the essential ingredients of this fascinating history, examining the earlier culinary traditions in which Ottoman cuisine was rooted, such as those of the Central Asian Turks, Abbasids, Seljuks, and Byzantines. She goes on to explore the diverse aspects of this rich culinary culture, including etiquette, cooks, restaurants, military food, food laws, and food trade. Drawing on everything from archival documents to poetry and featuring more than one hundred delectable illustrations, this meticulously researched, beautiful volume offers fresh and lively insight into an empire and cuisine that until recent decades have been too narrowly viewed through orientalist spectacles.

Yashim Cooks Istanbul: Culinary Adventures in the Ottoman Ki


Author: Jason Goodwin
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780957254015
Category:
Page: 224
View: 8895

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"Inspired by Jason Goodwin's bestselling mystery novels, Yashim Cooks Istanbul evokes the colors and flavours of the Ottoman world, with recipes from simple meze and vegetable dishes to meat, fish, and puddings."--Back cover.

Lords of the Horizons

A History of the Ottoman Empire
Author: Jason Goodwin
Publisher: Henry Holt and Company
ISBN: 1466874872
Category: History
Page: 368
View: 6214

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Since the Turks first shattered the glory of the French crusaders in 1396, the Ottoman Empire has exerted a long, strong pull on Western minds. For six hundred years, the Empire swelled and declined. Islamic, martial, civilized, and tolerant, in three centuries it advanced from the dusty foothills of Anatolia to rule on the Danube and the Nile; at the Empire's height, Indian rajahs and the kings of France beseeched its aid. For the next three hundred years the Empire seemed ready to collapse, a prodigy of survival and decay. Early in the twentieth century it fell. In this dazzling evocation of its power, Jason Goodwin explores how the Ottomans rose and how, against all odds, they lingered on. In the process he unfolds a sequence of mysteries, triumphs, treasures, and terrors unknown to most American readers. This was a place where pillows spoke and birds were fed in the snow; where time itself unfolded at a different rate and clocks were banned; where sounds were different, and even the hyacinths too strong to sniff. Dramatic and passionate, comic and gruesome, Lords of the Horizons is a history, a travel book, and a vision of a lost world all in one.

Daily Life in the Ottoman Empire


Author: Mehrdad Kia
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 031333692X
Category: History
Page: 294
View: 9629

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• The extensive bibliography provides rich and diverse sources of further reading • An index provides quick reference to the individuals and places mentioned in the text

The Ottoman Empire: A Historical Encyclopedia [2 volumes]


Author: Mehrdad Kia
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 1610693892
Category: History
Page: 662
View: 3464

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This two-volume reference provides university and high school students—and the general public—with a wealth of information on one of the most important empires the world has ever known. • Features approximately 180 entries that cover a wide variety of topics related to political, social, and culture aspects of Ottoman society • Features numerous primary documents that add to the vividness of the portrayal of individuals and events • Explores the many countries and numerous ethnic, linguistic, and cultural groups encompassed by the Ottoman Empire • Shows how, for much of its history, Jews, Christians, and Muslims lived side by side in this vast realm • Provides the only work of its kind written for university undergraduates, high school students, and the general public

Christians and Jews in the Ottoman Arab World

The Roots of Sectarianism
Author: Bruce Masters
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521005821
Category: History
Page: 240
View: 8502

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Masters explores the history of Christians and Jews in the Arab provinces of the Ottoman empire and how their identities as non-Muslims evolved over four hundred years. At the start of this period, in the sixteenth century, social community was circumscribed by religious identity and non-Muslims lived within the hierarchy established by Muslim law. In the nineteenth century, however, in response to Western influences, a radical change took place. Conflict erupted between Muslims and Christians in different parts of the empire in a challenge to that hierarchy. This marked the beginning, as the author illustrates, of the tensions which have to a large extent inspired the nationalist and religious rhetoric in the empire's successor states throughout the twentieth century. In this way, Masters negotiates the present through the past. His book will make a major contribution to an understanding of the political and religious conflicts of the modern Middle East.

The Pasha of Cuisine

A Novel
Author: Saygin Ersin
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing Inc.
ISBN: 1628729627
Category: Fiction
Page: 300
View: 2930

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For readers of Ken Follett's Kingsbridge series and Richard C. Morais's The Hundred-Foot Journey, a sweeping tale of love and the magic of food set during the Ottoman Empire. A Pasha of Cuisine is a rare talent in Ottoman lore. Only two, maybe three are born with such a gift every few centuries. A natural master of gastronomy, he is the sovereign genius who reigns over aromas and flavors and can use them to influence the hearts and minds, even the health, of those who taste his creations. In this fabulous novel, one such chef devises a plot bring down the Ottoman Empire—should he need to—in order to rescue the love of his life from the sultan’s harem. Himself a survivor of the bloodiest massacre ever recorded within the Imperial Palace after the passing of the last sultan, he is spirited away through the palace kitchens, where his potential was recognized. Across the empire, he is apprenticed one by one to the best chefs in all culinary disciplines and trained in related arts, such as the magic of spices, medicine, and the influence of the stars. It is during his journeys that he finds happiness with the beautiful, fiery dancing girl Kamer, and the two make plans to marry. Before they can elope, Kamer is sold into the Imperial Harem, and the young chef must find his way back into the Imperial Kitchens and transform his gift into an unbeatable weapon.

A Military History of the Ottomans: From Osman to Ataturk

From Osman to Ataturk
Author: Mesut Uyar Ph.D.,Edward J. Erickson
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 031305603X
Category: History
Page: 379
View: 3340

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The Ottoman Army had a significant effect on the history of the modern world and particularly on that of the Middle East and Europe. This study, written by a Turkish and an American scholar, is a revision and corrective to western accounts because it is based on Turkish interpretations, rather than European interpretations, of events. As the world's dominant military machine from 1300 to the mid-1700's, the Ottoman Army led the way in military institutions, organizational structures, technology, and tactics. In decline thereafter, it nevertheless remained a considerable force to be counted in the balance of power through 1918. From its nomadic origins, it underwent revolutions in military affairs as well as several transformations which enabled it to compete on favorable terms with the best of armies of the day. This study tracks the growth of the Ottoman Army as a professional institution from the perspective of the Ottomans themselves, by using previously untapped Ottoman source materials. Additionally, the impact of important commanders and the role of politics, as these affected the army, are examined. The study concludes with the Ottoman legacy and its effect on the Republic and modern Turkish Army. This is a study survey that combines an introductory view of this subject with fresh and original reference-level information. Divided into distinct periods, Uyar and Erickson open with a brief overview of the establishment of the Ottoman Empire and the military systems that shaped the early military patterns. The Ottoman army emerged forcefully in 1453 during the siege of Constantinople and became a dominant social and political force for nearly two hundred years following Mehmed's capture of the city. When the army began to show signs of decay during the mid-seventeenth century, successive Sultans actively sought to transform the institution that protected their power. The reforms and transformations that began frist in 1606successfully preserved the army until the outbreak of the Ottoman-Russian War in 1876. Though the war was brief, its impact was enormous as nationalistic and republican strains placed increasing pressure on the Sultan and his army until, finally, in 1918, those strains proved too great to overcome. By 1923, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk emerged as the leader of a unified national state ruled by a new National Parliament. As Uyar and Erickson demonstrate, the old army of the Sultan had become the army of the Republic, symbolizing the transformation of a dying empire to the new Turkish state make clear that throughout much of its existence, the Ottoman Army was an effective fighting force with professional military institutions and organizational structures.

The Ottoman Empire, 1700–1922


Author: Donald Quataert
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 113944591X
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 4862

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The Ottoman Empire was one of the most important non-Western states to survive from medieval to modern times, and played a vital role in European and global history. It continues to affect the peoples of the Middle East, the Balkans and central and western Europe to the present day. This new survey examines the major trends during the latter years of the empire; it pays attention to gender issues and to hotly-debated topics such as the treatment of minorities. In this second edition, Donald Quataert has updated his lively and authoritative text, revised the bibliographies, and included brief biographies of major figures on the Byzantines and the post Ottoman Middle East. This accessible narrative is supported by maps, illustrations and genealogical and chronological tables, which will be of help to students and non-specialists alike. It will appeal to anyone interested in the history of the Middle East.

The Janissary Tree


Author: Jason Goodwin
Publisher: Faber & Faber
ISBN: 0571267491
Category: Fiction
Page: 332
View: 2169

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Yashim is no ordinary detective. It's not that he's particularly brave. Or that he cooks so well, or reads French novels. Not even that his best friend is the Ambassador from Poland, whose country has vanished from the map. Yashim is a eunuch. As the Sultan plans a series of radical reforms to his empire, a concubine is strangled in the palace harem. And a young cadet is found butchered in the streets of Istanbul. Delving deep into the city's crooked alleyways, and deeper still into its tumultuous past, Yashim discovers that some people will go to any lengths to preserve the traditions of the Ottoman Empire. Brilliantly evoking Istanbul in the 1830s, The Ottoman Detective is a fast-paced literary thriller with a spectacular cast, from mystic orders and lissom archivists to soup-makers and a seductive ambassador's wife. Darker than any of these is the mysterious figure who controls the Sultan's harem.

Ottoman Centuries


Author: Lord Kinross
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0688080936
Category: History
Page: 640
View: 4542

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The Ottoman Empire began in 1300 under the almost legendary Osman I, reached its apogee in the sixteenth century under Suleiman the Magnificent, whose forces threatened the gates of Vienna, and gradually diminished thereafter until Mehmed VI was sent into exile by Mustafa Kemal (Ataturk). In this definitive history of the Ottoman Empire, Lord Kinross, painstaking historian and superb writer, never loses sight of the larger issues, economic, political, and social. At the same time he delineates his characters with obvious zest, displaying them in all their extravagance, audacity and, sometimes, ruthlessness.

The Fall of the Ottomans

The Great War in the Middle East
Author: Eugene Rogan
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465056695
Category: History
Page: 512
View: 1912

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In 1914 the Ottoman Empire was depleted of men and resources after years of war against Balkan nationalist and Italian forces. But in the aftermath of the assassination in Sarajevo, the powers of Europe were sliding inexorably toward war, and not even the Middle East could escape the vast and enduring consequences of one of the most destructive conflicts in human history. The Great War spelled the end of the Ottomans, unleashing powerful forces that would forever change the face of the Middle East. In The Fall of the Ottomans, award-winning historian Eugene Rogan brings the First World War and its immediate aftermath in the Middle East to vivid life, uncovering the often ignored story of the region's crucial role in the conflict. Bolstered by German money, arms, and military advisors, the Ottomans took on the Russian, British, and French forces, and tried to provoke Jihad against the Allies in their Muslim colonies. Unlike the static killing fields of the Western Front, the war in the Middle East was fast-moving and unpredictable, with the Turks inflicting decisive defeats on the Entente in Gallipoli, Mesopotamia, and Gaza before the tide of battle turned in the Allies' favor. The great cities of Baghdad, Jerusalem, and, finally, Damascus fell to invading armies before the Ottomans agreed to an armistice in 1918. The postwar settlement led to the partition of Ottoman lands between the victorious powers, and laid the groundwork for the ongoing conflicts that continue to plague the modern Arab world. A sweeping narrative of battles and political intrigue from Gallipoli to Arabia, The Fall of the Ottomans is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand the Great War and the making of the modern Middle East.

The Ottoman Endgame

War, Revolution, and the Making of the Modern Middle East, 1908-1923
Author: Sean McMeekin
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0143109804
Category: History
Page: 576
View: 3338

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Between 1911 and 1923, a series of wars - chief among them World War I - would engulf the Ottoman Empire and its successor states. Beginning with Italy's invasion of Ottoman Tripoli in September 1911, the opening salvo in what would soon spiral into a European conflict, the book concludes with the establishment of Turkish independence in the Treaty of Lausanne, 1923.

Earthly Delights


Author: N.A
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004367543
Category: History
Page: 562
View: 3160

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A group of 17 international experts examines continuities and discontinuities in the culinary cultures of the Ottoman Empire, East-Central Europe and the Balkans from the 17th to the 19th century.

The Ottoman Age of Exploration


Author: Giancarlo Casale
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199703388
Category: History
Page: 304
View: 9616

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In 1517, the Ottoman Sultan Selim "the Grim" conquered Egypt and brought his empire for the first time in history into direct contact with the trading world of the Indian Ocean. During the decades that followed, the Ottomans became progressively more engaged in the affairs of this vast and previously unfamiliar region, eventually to the point of launching a systematic ideological, military and commercial challenge to the Portuguese Empire, their main rival for control of the lucrative trade routes of maritime Asia. The Ottoman Age of Exploration is the first comprehensive historical account of this century-long struggle for global dominance, a struggle that raged from the shores of the Mediterranean to the Straits of Malacca, and from the interior of Africa to the steppes of Central Asia. Based on extensive research in the archives of Turkey and Portugal, as well as materials written on three continents and in a half dozen languages, it presents an unprecedented picture of the global reach of the Ottoman state during the sixteenth century. It does so through a dramatic recounting of the lives of sultans and viziers, spies, corsairs, soldiers-of-fortune, and women from the imperial harem. Challenging traditional narratives of Western dominance, it argues that the Ottomans were not only active participants in the Age of Exploration, but ultimately bested the Portuguese in the game of global politics by using sea power, dynastic prestige, and commercial savoir faire to create their own imperial dominion throughout the Indian Ocean.

Writing Food History

A Global Perspective
Author: Kyri W. Claflin,Peter Scholliers
Publisher: Berg
ISBN: 0857852175
Category: Social Science
Page: 304
View: 7331

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The vibrant interest in food studies among both academics and amateurs has made food history an exciting field of investigation. Taking stock of three decades of groundbreaking multidisciplinary research, the book examines two broad questions: What has history contributed to the development of food studies? How have other disciplines - sociology, anthropology, literary criticism, science, art history - influenced writing on food history in terms of approach, methodology, controversies, and knowledge of past foodways? Essays by twelve prominent scholars provide a compendium of global and multicultural answers to these questions. The contributors critically assess food history writing in the United States, Africa, Mexico and the Spanish Diaspora, India, the Ottoman Empire, the Far East - China, Japan and Korea - Europe, Jewish communities and the Middle East. Several historical eras are covered: the Ancient World, the Middle Ages, Early Modern Europe and the Modern day. The book is a unique addition to the growing literature on food history. It is required reading for anyone seeking a detailed discussion of food history research in diverse times and places.