The Novel of the Century

The Extraordinary Adventure of Les Misérables
Author: David Bellos
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 0374223238
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 336
View: 3475

Continue Reading →

"The story of how Victor Hugo wrote Les Misérables and why it became among the most influential and protean works of art ever created"--

The Novel of the Century

The Extraordinary Adventure of Les Misérables
Author: David Bellos
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 0374716293
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 336
View: 2643

Continue Reading →

A New York Times Book Review Editors' Choice Winner of the American Library in Paris Book Award, 2017 Les Misérables is among the most popular and enduring novels ever written. Like Inspector Javert’s dogged pursuit of Jean Valjean, its appeal has never waned, but only grown broader in its one-hundred-and-fifty-year life. Whether we encounter Victor Hugo’s story on the page, onstage, or on-screen, Les Misérables continues to captivate while also, perhaps unexpectedly, speaking to contemporary concerns. In The Novel of the Century, the acclaimed scholar and translator David Bellos tells us why. This enchanting biography of a classic of world literature is written for “Les Mis” fanatics and novices alike. Casting decades of scholarship into accessible narrative form, Bellos brings to life the extraordinary story of how Victor Hugo managed to write his novel of the downtrodden despite a revolution, a coup d’état, and political exile; how he pulled off a pathbreaking deal to get it published; and how his approach to the “social question” would define his era’s moral imagination. More than an ode to Hugo’s masterpiece, The Novel of the Century also shows that what Les Misérables has to say about poverty, history, and revolution is full of meaning today.

The Novel of the Century

The Extraordinary Adventure of Les Misérables
Author: David Bellos
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141969792
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 304
View: 8446

Continue Reading →

GUARDIAN BOOKS OF THE YEAR 2017 'Never mind those self-help manuals urging that some classic novel may change your life; in this sparkling study of the birth, growth and afterlife of Hugo's evergreen blockbuster, David Bellos argues that Les Misérables already has' Boyd Tonkin, Economist 'Any reader who hasn't yet embarked on Hugo's book might be converted to the idea by this one' Daniel Hahn, Spectator The extraordinary story of how a simple tale of love and revolution, the poor and the downtrodden - Victor Hugo's beloved classic Les Misérables - conquered the world. There has never been a book like it. It is the most widely read and frequently adapted story of all time, on stage and on film. But why is Les Misérables the novel of the century? David Bellos's remarkable new book brings to life the extraordinary story of how Hugo managed to write his epic novel despite a revolution, a coup d'état and political exile; how he pulled off the deal of the century to get it published, and set it on course to become the novel that epitomizes the grand sweep of history in the nineteenth century. Packed full of information about the background and design of Les Misérables, this biography of a masterpiece nonetheless insists that the moral and social message of Hugo's ever-popular novel is just as important for our century as it was for its own. The Novel of the Century is a book as rich, remarkable and long-lasting as the novel at its heart. Les Misérables is available as a Penguin Classic, in an acclaimed new translation by Christine Donougher, with an introduction by Robert Tombs.

The Death of a Century

A Novel of the Lost Generation
Author: Daniel Robinson
Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.
ISBN: 1628725508
Category: Fiction
Page: 280
View: 1384

Continue Reading →

Greenwich, Connecticut, 1922. Newspaper man Joe Henry finds himself the primary suspect when his friend, fellow reporter Wynton Gresham, is murdered. Both were veterans of French battles during WWI—the war that was supposed to end all wars. Unanswered questions pile up in the wake of a violent night: Gresham lies dead in his home, a manuscript he had just completed has gone missing, three Frenchmen lay dead in a car accident less than a mile from Gresham's home, and a trunk full of Gresham's clothes lay neatly packed in his bedroom. Hours after his friend's death, Henry discovers in Gresham's desk drawer a one-way ticket reserved in his friend's name aboard a steamer ship to France. The ticket is dated for the next day. Henry steals away under Gresham's identity, escaping the heated interrogation of the town sheriff, to Paris in the roaring 20s. In the City of Light he becomes a hunted man. To clear his name he must find the man responsible for his friend's murder, while evading his own, and discover the deadly secret revealed in the lost manuscript. In the process, with the help of other broken veteran expats of Hemingway's Lost Generation living in Paris, he finds hope in a world irrevocably altered by war. Skyhorse Publishing, as well as our Arcade, Yucca, and Good Books imprints, are proud to publish a broad range of books for readers interested in fiction—novels, novellas, political and medical thrillers, comedy, satire, historical fiction, romance, erotic and love stories, mystery, classic literature, folklore and mythology, literary classics including Shakespeare, Dumas, Wilde, Cather, and much more. While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home.

Turn of the Century


Author: Kurt Andersen
Publisher: Delta
ISBN: 0307785572
Category: Fiction
Page: 672
View: 6775

Continue Reading →

As big and exciting as the next century, this is a novel of real life at our giddy, feverish, topsy-turvy edge of the millennium. Turn of the Century is a good old-fashioned novel about the day after tomorrow--an uproarious, exquisitely observed panorama of our world as the twentieth century morphs into the twenty-first, transforming family, marriage, and friendship and propelled by the supercharged global businesses and new technologies that make everyone's lives shake and spin a little faster. As the year 2000 progresses, George Mactier and Lizzie Zimbalist, ten years married, are caught up in the whirl of their centrifugally accelerating lives. George is a TV producer for the upstart network MBC, launching a truly and weirdly groundbreaking new show that blurs the line between fact and fiction. Lizzie is a software entrepreneur dealing with the breakneck pleasures and pains of running her own company in an industry where the rules are rewritten daily. Rocketing between Los An-geles and Seattle, with occasional stopovers at home in Manhattan for tag-team parenting of their three children, George and Lizzie are the kind of businesspeople who, growing up in the sixties and seventies, never dreamed they would end up in business. They're too busy to spend the money that's rolling in, and too smart not to feel ambivalent about their crazed, high-gloss existences, but nothing seems to slow the roller-coaster momentum of their inter-secting lives and careers. However, after Lizzie, recovering from a Microsoft deal gone awry, becomes a confidante and adviser to George's boss, billionaire media mogul Harold Mose, the couple discovers that no amount of sophisticated spin can obscure basic instincts: envy, greed, suspicion, sexual temptation--and, maybe, love. When they and their children are finally drawn into a thrilling, high-tech corporate hoax that sends Wall Street reeling (and makes one person very, very rich), George and Lizzie can only marvel at life's oversized surprises and hold on for dear life. Like Tom Wolfe's Bonfire of the Vanities, Kurt Andersen's Turn of the Century lays bare the follies of our age with laser-beam precision, creating memorable characters and dissecting the ways we think, speak, and navigate this new era of extreme capitalism and mind-boggling technology. Entertaining, imaginative, knowing, and wise, Turn of the Century is a richly plotted comedy of manners about the way we live now. From the Hardcover edition.

The Five

A Novel of Jewish Life in Turn-of-the-Century Odessa
Author: Vladimir Jabotinsky
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801471621
Category: Fiction
Page: 224
View: 450

Continue Reading →

"The beginning of this tale of bygone days in Odessa dates to the dawn of the twentieth century. At that time we used to refer to the first years of this period as the 'springtime,' meaning a social and political awakening. For my generation, these years also coincided with our own personal springtime, in the sense that we were all in our youthful twenties. And both of these springtimes, as well as the image of our carefree Black Sea capital with acacias growing along its steep banks, are interwoven in my memory with the story of one family in which there were five children: Marusya, Marko, Lika, Serezha, and Torik."—from The Five The Five is an captivating novel of the decadent fin-de-siècle written by Vladimir Jabotinsky (1880–1940), a controversial leader in the Zionist movement whose literary talents, until now, have largely gone unrecognized by Western readers. The author deftly paints a picture of Russia's decay and decline—a world permeated with sexuality, mystery, and intrigue. Michael R. Katz has crafted the first English-language translation of this important novel, which was written in Russian in 1935 and published a year later in Paris under the title Pyatero. The book is Jabotinsky's elegaic paean to the Odessa of his youth, a place that no longer exists. It tells the story of an upper-middle-class Jewish family, the Milgroms, at the turn of the century. It follows five siblings as they change, mature, and come to accept their places in a rapidly evolving world. With flashes of humor, Jabotinsky captures the ferment of the time as reflected in political, social, artistic, and spiritual developments. He depicts with nostalgia the excitement of life in old Odessa and comments poignantly on the failure of the dream of Jewish assimilation within the Russian empire.

Little Century

A Novel
Author: Anna Keesey
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 1429945273
Category: Fiction
Page: 336
View: 2318

Continue Reading →

In the tradition of such classics as My Ántonia and There Will Be Blood, Anna Keesey's Little Century is a resonant and moving debut novel by a writer of confident gifts. Orphaned after the death of her mother, eighteen-year-old Esther Chambers heads west in search of her only living relative. In the lawless frontier town of Century, Oregon, she's met by her distant cousin, a laconic cattle rancher named Ferris Pickett. Pick leads her to a tiny cabin by a small lake called Half-a-Mind, and there she begins her new life as a homesteader. If she can hold out for five years, the land will join Pick's already impressive spread. But Esther discovers that this town on the edge of civilization is in the midst of a range war. There's plenty of land, but somehow it is not enough for the ranchers—it's cattle against sheep, with water at a premium. In this charged climate, small incidents of violence swiftly escalate, and Esther finds her sympathies divided between her cousin and a sheepherder named Ben Cruff, a sworn enemy of the cattle ranchers. As her feelings for Ben and for her land grow, she begins to see she can't be loyal to both. Little Century maps our country's cutthroat legacy of dispossession and greed, even as it celebrates the ecstatic visions of what America could become.

Traveler of the Century

A Novel
Author: Andrés Neuman
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 1466816155
Category: Fiction
Page: 576
View: 2343

Continue Reading →

Searching for an inn, the enigmatic traveler Hans stops in a small city on the border between Saxony and Prussia. The next morning, Hans meets an old organ-grinder in the market square and immediately finds himself enmeshed in an intense debate—on identity and what it is that defines us—from which he cannot break free. Indefinitely stuck in Wandernburg until his debate with the organ-grinder is concluded, he begins to meet the various characters who populate the town, including a young freethinker named Sophie. Though she is engaged to be married, Sophie and Hans begin a relationship that defies contemporary mores about female sexuality and what can and cannot be said about it. Traveler of the Century is a deeply intellectual novel, chock-full of discussions about philosophy, history, literature, love, and translation. It is a book that looks to the past in order to have us reconsider the conflicts of our present. The winner of Spain's prestigious Alfaguara Prize and the National Critics Prize, Traveler of the Century marks the English-language debut of Andrés Neuman, a writer described by Roberto Bolaño as being "touched by grace."

Fall of Giants


Author: Ken Follett
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0451232852
Category: Fiction
Page: 942
View: 4293

Continue Reading →

The first novel in The Century Trilogy follows the fates of five interrelated familiesNAmerican, German, Russian, English, and WelshNas they move through the world-shaking dramas of the First World War, the Russian Revolution, and the struggle for women's suffrage.

The Chinese Novel at the Turn of the Century


Author: Milena Dolezelova-Velingerova
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 1442638338
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 240
View: 1812

Continue Reading →

This collection of essays reveals the dynamic role of the late Qing novel in the process of modernization of Chinese fiction. Substantial changes in various aspects of the Chinese novel at the turn of the century, demonstrated by structural analyses of several representative novels, suggest that the evolution of modern Chinese fiction was a more complex process than a simple imitation of Western literatures. The results challenge the scholarly consensus that modern Chinese fiction resulted from a radical change brought about by the May Fourth Movement in 1919. It is demonstrated rather that the transformation had already begun in the first decade of the twentieth century and that the conspicuous changes in Chinese fiction of the 1920s represent a culmination rather than a beginning of the modern evolutionary process. The book consists of nine studies which analyse the late Qing novel in its general and specific aspects. The introduction and first essay explain how social changes conditioned cultural and literary changes during the period and how the resultant new theory of fiction generated new concepts of a politically engaged novel. The two following studies develop a general statement of narrative structures and devices, derived from structural analyses of seven outstanding late Qing novels. The last six articles examine particular novels in detail, focusing on the specific fictional techniques which predominate in each. This is the first volume in a new series, Modern East Asian Studies.

City of Light


Author: Lauren Belfer
Publisher: Dial Press
ISBN: 9780307764027
Category: Fiction
Page: 512
View: 4001

Continue Reading →

It is 1901 and Buffalo, New York, stands at the center of the nation's attention as a place of immense wealth and sophistication. The massive hydroelectric power development at nearby Niagara Falls and the grand Pan-American Exposition promise to bring the Great Lakes "city of light" even more repute. Against this rich historical backdrop lives Louisa Barrett, the attractive, articulate headmistress of the Macaulay School for Girls. Protected by its powerful all-male board, "Miss Barrett" is treated as an equal by the men who control the life of the city. Lulled by her unique relationship with these titans of business, Louisa feels secure in her position, until a mysterious death at the power plant triggers a sequence of events that forces her to return to a past she has struggled to conceal, and to question everything and everyone she holds dear. Both observer and participant, Louisa Barrett guides the reader through the culture and conflicts of a time and place where immigrant factory workers and nature conservationists protest violently against industrialists, where presidents broker politics, where wealthy "Negroes" fight for recognition and equality, and where women struggle to thrive in a system that allows them little freedom. Wrought with remarkable depth and intelligence, City of Light remains a work completely of its own era, and of ours as well. A stirring literary accomplishment, Lauren Belfer's first novel marks the debut of a fresh voice for the new millennium and heralds a major publishing event. From the Paperback edition.

A Century of November

A Novel
Author: W. D. Wetherell
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
ISBN: 0472021613
Category: Fiction
Page: 176
View: 4037

Continue Reading →

Winner of the 2004 Michigan Literary Fiction Award for novel A haunting story of the power of death, the pain of loss, and the possibility of hope. "Gripping, damning, and transfixing." ---Entertainment Weekly " . . . possesses a time-bending gravity. . . . [A] small classic of graceful language and earned emotion." ---San Francisco Chronicle ". . . a beautifully written novel of war and the wrenching grief and unanswerable questions it leaves in its wake. . . . A Century of November is full of precise, startling imagery and elegant, richly poetic description---Wetherell seems genuinely incapable of writing a lazy sentence---and this last section of the novel is as surreal, hypnotic and harrowing as any literature in recent memory. The whole thing, in fact, is a jewel, an unforgettable historical novel that Wetherell has carefully (and artfully) seeded with loads of contemporary resonance." ---Star-Tribune (Minneapolis) "A poignant, probing story. . . . Wetherell's prose and character writing are unflinching . . . [and his] take on a parent's anguish is deeply moving." ---Publishers Weekly "A timely reminder of the devastation of mortal combat. . . ." ---Atlanta Journal-Constitution

Voyage

A Novel of 1896
Author: Sterling Hayden
Publisher: Sheridan House, Inc.
ISBN: 9781574090857
Category: Fiction
Page: 700
View: 3245

Continue Reading →

The maiden voyage of the five-masted, iron-hulled Neptune's Car from Freeport, Maine, around the Horn to San Francisco provides the setting for a novel which portrays the diversity and color of American society at the turn of the century

The Inexplicables

A Novel of the Clockwork Century
Author: Cherie Priest
Publisher: Tor Books
ISBN: 1429944927
Category: Fiction
Page: 368
View: 4222

Continue Reading →

Rector "Wreck ‘em" Sherman was orphaned as a toddler in the Blight of 1863, but that was years ago. Wreck has grown up, and on his eighteenth birthday, he'll be cast out out of the orphanage. And Wreck's problems aren't merelyabout finding a home. He's been quietly breaking the cardinal rule of any good drug dealer and dipping into his own supply of the sap he sells. He's also pretty sure he's being haunted by the ghost of a kid he used to know—Zeke Wilkes, who almost certainly died six months ago. Zeke would have every reason to pester Wreck, since Wreck got him inside the walled city of Seattle in the first place, and that was probably what killed him.Maybe it's only a guilty conscience, but Wreck can't take it anymore, so he sneaks over the wall. The walled-off wasteland of Seattle is every bit as bad as he'd heard, chock-full of the hungry undead and utterly choked by the poisonous, inescapable yellow gas. And then there's the monster. Rector's pretty certain that whatever attacked him was not at all human—and not a rotter, either. Arms far too long. Posture all strange. Eyes all wild and faintly glowing gold and known to the locals as simpley "The Inexplicables." In the process of tracking down these creatures, Rector comes across another incursion through the wall—just as bizarre but entirely attributable to human greed. It seems some outsiders have decided there's gold to be found in the city and they're willing to do whatever it takes to get a piece of the pie unless Rector and his posse have anything to do with it. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

Pale Fire


Author: Vladimir Nabokov
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307787656
Category: Fiction
Page: 320
View: 8228

Continue Reading →

In Pale Fire Nabokov offers a cornucopia of deceptive pleasures: a 999-line poem by the reclusive genius John Shade; an adoring foreword and commentary by Shade's self-styled Boswell, Dr. Charles Kinbote; a darkly comic novel of suspense, literary idolatry and one-upmanship, and political intrigue.

The Novel

A Survival Skill
Author: Tim Parks
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0198739591
Category: Books and reading
Page: 185
View: 9811

Continue Reading →

In this book the distinguished novelist Tim Parks presents reading a novel as an exciting and dangerous meeting with another person. For the novelist, writing the book is part of life, a card played in the long psychological game of dealing with the world. For readers, their reaction to a work of fiction is likewise part of life as we seek a structure or strategy of understanding for ourselves. Engaged with numerous great novels and with focused discussion ofJames Joyce, Thomas Hardy, Charles Dickens. D. H. Lawrence, and J.M. Coetzee, The Novel: A Survival Skill gets much closer to the real experience of reading and writing, the mysteries of our positiveand negative responses, than traditional literary criticism. Parks also devotes some time to exploring his own writing in the light of the arguments he is putting forward. The result is a compelling, risk-taking account of what is at stake in the lived experience of writing and of reading. The book also suggests why so much literary criticism seems entirely arcane and irrelevant to the 'ordinary' reader.

Les Miserables, Volume I

Fantine: Unabridged Bilingual Edition: English-French
Author: Victor Hugo
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780986400667
Category:
Page: 594
View: 6358

Continue Reading →

Volume one of five The unabridged form of this story runs to over 1,900 pages in either French or English, necessitating multiple volumes of this bilingual edition, which is designed to assist those learning French. The original French text appears on the right-hand pages of the book, with the corresponding English translation on the left-hand pages. Other bilingual books available from Sleeping Cat Books: "The Picture of Dorian Gray Selected Works of Edgar Allan Poe Fables of Jean de La Fontaine Candide Shakespeare's Sonnets New Fairy Tales for Small Children The Tales of Mother Goose The Count of Monte Cristo The Last of the Mohicans Madame Bovary"

The Novel of Purpose

Literature and Social Reform in the Anglo-American World
Author: Amanda Claybaugh
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 150172701X
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 264
View: 863

Continue Reading →

In the nineteenth century, Great Britain and the United States shared a single literary marketplace that linked the reform movements, as well as the literatures, of the two nations. The writings of transatlantic reformers—antislavery, temperance, and suffrage activists—gave novelists a new sense of purpose and prompted them to invent new literary forms. The result was a distinctively Anglo-American realism, in which novelists, conceiving of themselves as reformers, sought to act upon their readers—and, through their readers, the world. Indeed, reform became so predominant that many novelists borrowed from reformist writings even though they were skeptical of reform itself. Among them are some of the century's most important authors: Anne Brontë, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Thomas Hardy, Henry James, Elizabeth Stoddard, and Mark Twain. The Novel of Purpose proposes a new way of understanding social reform in Great Britain and the United States. Amanda Claybaugh offers readings that connect reformist agitation to the formal features of literary works and argues for a method of transatlantic study that attends not only to nations, but also to the many groups that collaborate across national boundaries.

Winter of the World

Book Two of the Century Trilogy
Author: Ken Follett
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101591439
Category: Fiction
Page: 928
View: 4124

Continue Reading →

"This book is truly epic. . . . The reader will probably wish there was a thousand more pages." —The Huffington Post Picking up where Fall of Giants, the first novel in the extraordinary Century Trilogy, left off, Winter of the World follows its five interrelated families—American, German, Russian, English, and Welsh—through a time of enormous social, political, and economic turmoil, beginning with the rise of the Third Reich, through the great dramas of World War II, and into the beginning of the long Cold War. Carla von Ulrich, born of German and English parents, finds her life engulfed by the Nazi tide until daring to commit a deed of great courage and heartbreak . . . . American brothers Woody and Chuck Dewar, each with a secret, take separate paths to momentous events, one in Washington, the other in the bloody jungles of the Pacific . . . . English student Lloyd Williams discovers in the crucible of the Spanish Civil War that he must fight Communism just as hard as Fascism . . . . Daisy Peshkov, a driven social climber, cares only for popularity and the fast set until war transforms her life, while her cousin Volodya carves out a position in Soviet intelligence that will affect not only this war but also the war to come.

The Executioner's Heir

A Novel of Eighteenth-Century France
Author: Susanne Alleyn
Publisher: CreateSpace
ISBN: 9781492306795
Category: Fiction
Page: 348
View: 8512

Continue Reading →

Charles-Henri Sanson is young, handsome, sophisticated, and rich. He is also the eldest son of Paris's most dreaded public official—and in the 1760s, after centuries of superstition, the executioner and all his family are outcasts. Charles knows far too well, despite the loathing he feels for the job, that the hangman's son must become one himself or starve, for society's doors are closed to him. For years Charles reluctantly administers the monarchy's merciless justice, while trying to put out of his mind the horrors of public whipping, hanging, breaking, and burning that he witnesses daily. But at last the day comes when—faced with stark injustice—he cannot reconcile the law's brutal demands with his conscience. Sure to appeal to fans of the “Hangman's Daughter” tales, The Executioner's Heir, the true story of a pair of tragic, converging lives, is a darkly atmospheric novel of prerevolutionary France in all its elegance, decadence, and cruelty. "Charles's personal crisis and clashing loyalties evoke Greek tragedy, and speak to the issues that will resonate with readers." (Starred Review) --Publishers Weekly"Alleyn's exhaustive research pays off handsomely in well-drawn characters and colorful historical context. In particular, her female characters are refreshing in their range and willingness to defy stereotypes. A sequel would be welcome to this deftly imagined tale of the years before the French Revolution. A well-researched, robust tale featuring an endearing executioner." --Kirkus Reviews