The Willie Lynch Letter and the Making of a Slave


Author: Willie Lynch
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781537079684
Category:
Page: 26
View: 6366

Continue Reading →

The Willie Lynch Letter and The Making of A Slave is an address purportedly delivered by a certain Willie Lynch to an audience on the bank of the James River in Virginia in the year 1712 regarding control of African American slaves within the colony. Some have considered the Willie Lynch Letter and The Making of A Slave to be a hoax that was designed to fuel discrimination & racism in the United States by touching on a very sensitive and negative part of history in America. The letter is said to be a verbatim account of a short speech given by a slave owner, in which he tells other slave masters that he has discovered the secret to controlling African American slaves by setting them against one another.

The Willie Lynch Letter


Author: William Lynch
Publisher: CreateSpace
ISBN: 9781463570538
Category: History
Page: 38
View: 3663

Continue Reading →

The Willie Lynch letter purports to be a verbatim account of a short speech given by a slave owner, in which he tells other slave masters that he has discovered the "secret" to controlling black slaves by setting them against one another. The document has been in print since at least 1970, but first gained widespread notice in the 1990s, when it appeared on the Internet. Since then, it has often been promoted as an authentic account of slavery during the 18th century, though its inaccuracies and anachronisms have led historians to conclude that it is a hoax.

The Willie Lynch Letter

The Making of a Slave
Author: N.A
Publisher: Frontline Distribution International
ISBN: 9780948390531
Category: Social Science
Page: 30
View: 8981

Continue Reading →

Describes the African slave trade from the viewpoint of the Southern plantation owners.

The Half Has Never Been Told

Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism
Author: Edward E. Baptist
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465097685
Category: History
Page: 560
View: 9974

Continue Reading →

Americans tend to cast slavery as a pre-modern institution—the nation's original sin, perhaps, but isolated in time and divorced from America's later success. But to do so robs the millions who suffered in bondage of their full legacy. As historian Edward Baptist reveals in The Half Has Never Been Told, the expansion of slavery in the first eight decades after American independence drove the evolution and modernization of the United States. In the span of a single lifetime, the South grew from a narrow coastal strip of worn-out tobacco plantations to a continental cotton empire, and the United States grew into a modern, industrial, and capitalist economy. Until the Civil War, Baptist explains, the most important American economic innovations were ways to make slavery ever more profitable. Through forced migration and torture, slave owners extracted continual increases in efficiency from enslaved African Americans. Thus the United States seized control of the world market for cotton, the key raw material of the Industrial Revolution, and became a wealthy nation with global influence. Told through intimate slave narratives, plantation records, newspapers, and the words of politicians, entrepreneurs, and escaped slaves, The Half Has Never Been Told offers a radical new interpretation of American history. It forces readers to reckon with the violence at the root of American supremacy, but also with the survival and resistance that brought about slavery's end—and created a culture that sustains America's deepest dreams of freedom.

The Making of New World Slavery

From the Baroque to the Modern, 1492-1800
Author: Robin Blackburn
Publisher: Verso
ISBN: 9781859841952
Category: History
Page: 602
View: 1682

Continue Reading →

In this companion volume to the acclaimed classic The Overthrow of Colonial Slavery, Robin Blackburn traces European doctrines of race and slavery from medieval times to the early modern epoch. At the time when European powers colonized the Americas, the institution of slavery had almost disappeared from Europe itself. Having overcome an institution widely regarded as oppressive, why did they sponsor the construction of racial slavery in their new colonies? The Making of New World Slavery finds in the emergent West both a stigmatization of the ethno-religious Other and a new culture of consumption, freed from earlier moral restrictions. Robin Blackburn argues that independent commerce, geared to burgeoning consumer markets, was the driving force behind the rise of plantation slavery. The Baroque state fed greedily off this commerce whilst unsuccessfully seeking to regulate slavery. Successive chapters of the book consider the deployment of slaves in the colonial possessions of the Portuguese, the Spanish, the Dutch, the English and the French. Robin Blackburn argues that the organization of slave plantations placed the West on a destructive path to modernity and that greatly preferable alternatives were both proposed and rejected. Finally he shows that the surge of Atlantic trade, premised on the killing toil of the plantations, made a decisive contribution to both the Industrial Revolution and the rise of the West. The Making of New World Slavery is a masterly study of this momentous and baleful epoch in the making of the modern world.

The Making of a Racist

A Southerner Reflects on Family, History, and the Slave Trade
Author: Charles B. Dew
Publisher: University of Virginia Press
ISBN: 0813938880
Category: History
Page: 200
View: 855

Continue Reading →

In this powerful memoir, Charles Dew, one of America’s most respected historians of the South--and particularly its history of slavery--turns the focus on his own life, which began not in the halls of enlightenment but in a society unequivocally committed to segregation. Dew re-creates the midcentury American South of his childhood--in many respects a boy’s paradise, but one stained by Lost Cause revisionism and, worse, by the full brunt of Jim Crow. Through entertainments and "educational" books that belittled African Americans, as well as the living examples of his own family, Dew was indoctrinated in a white supremacy that, at best, was condescendingly paternalistic and, at worst, brutally intolerant. The fear that southern culture, and the "hallowed white male brotherhood," could come undone through the slightest flexibility in the color line gave the Jim Crow mindset its distinctly unyielding quality. Dew recalls his father, in most regards a decent man, becoming livid over a black tradesman daring to use the front, and not the back, door. The second half of the book shows how this former Confederate youth and descendant of Thomas Roderick Dew, one of slavery’s most passionate apologists, went on to reject his racist upbringing and become a scholar of the South and its deeply conflicted history. The centerpiece of Dew’s story is his sobering discovery of a price circular from 1860--an itemized list of humans up for sale. Contemplating this document becomes Dew’s first step in an exploration of antebellum Richmond’s slave trade that investigates the terrible--but, to its white participants, unremarkable--inhumanity inherent in the institution. Dew’s wish with this book is to show how the South of his childhood came into being, poisoning the minds even of honorable people, and to answer the question put to him by Illinois Browning Culver, the African American woman who devoted decades of her life to serving his family: "Charles, why do the grown-ups put so much hate in the children?"

Capitalism and Slavery


Author: Eric Williams
Publisher: Lulu Press, Inc
ISBN: 1329560086
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 3392

Continue Reading →

The present study is an attempt to place in historical perspective the relationship between early capitalism as exemplified by Great Britain, and the Negro slave trade, Negro slavery and the general colonial trade of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. It is strictly an economic study of the role of Negro slavery and the slave trade in providing the capital which financed the Industrial Revolution in England and of mature industrial capitalism in destroying the slave system.

The Making of a Slave


Author: Willie Lynch
Publisher: Lulu Press, Inc
ISBN: 1312075724
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 8238

Continue Reading →

A required reading for various courses and curriculums on the plight of the African American

The Slave Ship Clotilda and the Making of AfricaTown, USA

Spirit of Our Ancestors
Author: Natalie S. Robertson
Publisher: Praeger Publishers
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 256
View: 6641

Continue Reading →

Shows how African captives endured capture, imprisonment, the middle passage, and slavery in America only to persevere and found a free and still-vibrant community in America.

Slavery by Another Name

The re-enslavement of black americans from the civil war to World War Two
Author: Douglas A. Blackmon
Publisher: Icon Books
ISBN: 1848314132
Category: Social Science
Page: 496
View: 6865

Continue Reading →

A Pulitzer Prize-winning history of the mistreatment of black Americans. In this 'precise and eloquent work' - as described in its Pulitzer Prize citation - Douglas A. Blackmon brings to light one of the most shameful chapters in American history - an 'Age of Neoslavery' that thrived in the aftermath of the Civil War through the dawn of World War II. Using a vast record of original documents and personal narratives, Blackmon unearths the lost stories of slaves and their descendants who journeyed into freedom after the Emancipation Proclamation and then back into the shadow of involuntary servitude thereafter. By turns moving, sobering and shocking, this unprecedented account reveals these stories, the companies that profited the most from neoslavery, and the insidious legacy of racism that reverberates today.

Twelve Years A Slave (Illustrated)


Author: Solomon Northup
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 2765903190
Category: History
Page: 300
View: 773

Continue Reading →

Twelve Years a Slave (1853) is a memoir and slave narrative by Solomon Northup, as told to and edited by David Wilson. Northup, a black man who was born free in New York, details his kidnapping in Washington, D.C. and subsequent sale into slavery. After having been kept in bondage for 12 years in Louisiana by various masters, Northup was able to write to friends and family in New York, who were in turn able to secure his release. Northup's account provides extensive details on the slave markets in Washington, D.C. and New Orleans and describes at length cotton and sugar cultivation on major plantations in Louisiana.

Breaking the Curse of Willie Lynch

The Science of Slave Psychology
Author: Alvin Morrow
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780972035217
Category: Psychology
Page: 113
View: 2698

Continue Reading →

Top Shelf, Essence Magazine, African American Bestseller!

Tobacco and Slaves

The Development of Southern Cultures in the Chesapeake, 1680-1800
Author: Allan Kulikoff
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 0807839221
Category: History
Page: 467
View: 6796

Continue Reading →

Tobacco and Slaves is a major reinterpretation of the economic and political transformation of Chesapeake society from 1680 to 1800. Building upon massive archival research in Maryland and Virginia, Allan Kulikoff provides the most comprehensive study to date of changing social relations--among both blacks and whites--in the eighteenth-century South. He links his arguments about class, gender, and race to the later social history of the South and to larger patterns of American development. Allan Kulikoff is professor of history at Northern Illinois University and author of The Agrarian Origins of American Capitalism.

The Willie Lynch Letter and the Making of a Slave


Author: Willie Lynch
Publisher: Ravenio Books
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 8843

Continue Reading →

This speech was said to have been delivered by Willie Lynch on the bank of the James River in the colony of Virginia in 1712. Lynch was a British slave owner in the West Indies. He was invited to the colony of Virginia in 1712 to teach his methods to slave owners there.