The Madrid Codex

New Approaches to Understanding an Ancient Maya Manuscript
Author: Gabrielle Vail,Anthony Aveni
Publisher: Univ Pr of Colorado
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 426
View: 8207

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This volume offers new calendrical models and methodologies for reading, dating, and interpreting the general significance of the Madrid Codex. The longest of the surviving Maya codices, the Madrid Codex includes texts and images painted by scribes conversant in Maya hieroglyphic writing, a written means of communication practiced by Maya elites from the second to the fifteenth centuries A.D. Some scholars have recently argued that the Madrid Codex originated in the Petén region of Guatemala and post-dates European contact. The contributors to this volume challenge that view by demonstrating convincingly that it originated in northern Yucatán and was painted in the Pre-Columbian era. In addition, several contributors reveal provocative connections among the Madrid and Borgia group of codices from Central Mexico.

Astronomers, Scribes, and Priests

Intellectual Interchange Between the Northern Maya Lowlands and Highland Mexico in the Late Postclassic Period
Author: Gabrielle Vail,Christine L. Hernández
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780884023463
Category: History
Page: 431
View: 8614

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Astronomers, Scribes, and Priests examines evidence for cultural interchange among the intellectual powerbrokers in Postclassic Mesoamerica, specifically those centered in the northern Maya lowlands and the central Mexican highlands. Contributors to the volume’s thirteen chapters bring an interdisciplinary perspective to understanding the interactions that led to shared content in hieroglyphic codices and mural art. The authors address similarities in artifacts, architectural styles, and building alignments—often produced in regions separated by hundreds of miles—based on their analyses of iconographic, archaeological, linguistic, and epigraphic material. The volume includes a wealth of new data and interpretive frameworks in this comprehensive discussion of a critical time period in the Mesoamerican past.

New Perspectives on Human Sacrifice and Ritual Body Treatments in Ancient Maya Society


Author: Vera Tiesler,Andrea Cucina
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9780387488714
Category: Social Science
Page: 319
View: 825

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This book examines Maya sacrifice and related posthumous body manipulation. The editors bring together an international group of contributors from the area studied: archaeologists as well as anthropologists, forensic anthropologists, art historians and bioarchaeologists. This interdisciplinary approach provides a comprehensive perspective on these sites as well as the material culture and biological evidence found there

Re-Creating Primordial Time

Foundation Rituals and Mythology in the Postclassic Maya Codices
Author: Gabrielle Vail,Christine Hernández
Publisher: University Press of Colorado
ISBN: 1607322218
Category: Social Science
Page: 503
View: 5843

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Re-Creating Primordial Time offers a new perspective on the Maya codices, documenting the extensive use of creation mythology and foundational rituals in the hieroglyphic texts and iconography of these important manuscripts. Focusing on both pre-Columbian codices and early colonial creation accounts, Vail and Hernández show that in spite of significant cultural change during the Postclassic and Colonial periods, the mythological traditions reveal significant continuity, beginning as far back as the Classic period. Remarkable similarities exist within the Maya tradition, even as new mythologies were introduced through contact with the Gulf Coast region and highland central Mexico. Vail and Hernández analyze the extant Maya codices within the context of later literary sources such as the Books of Chilam Balam, the Popol Vuh, and the Códice Chimalpopoca to present numerous examples highlighting the relationship among creation mythology, rituals, and lore. Compiling and comparing Maya creation mythology with that of the Borgia codices from highland central Mexico, Re-Creating Primordial Time is a significant contribution to the field of Mesoamerican studies and will be of interest to scholars of archaeology, linguistics, epigraphy, and comparative religions alike.

Archaeoastronomy and the Maya


Author: Gerardo Aldana y V.,Edwin L. Barnhart
Publisher: Oxbow Books
ISBN: 1782976469
Category: Social Science
Page: 176
View: 7878

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Archaeoastronomy and the Maya illustrates archaeoastronomical approaches to ancient Mayan cultural production. The book is contextualized through a history of archaeoastronomical investigations into Mayan sites, originating in the 19th century discovery of astronomical tables within hieroglyphic books. Early 20th century archaeological excavations revealed inscriptions carved into stone that also preserved astronomical records, along with architecture that was built to reflect astronomical orientations. These materials provided the basis of a growing professionalized archaeoastronomy, blossoming in the 1970s and expanding into recent years. The chapters here exemplify the advances made in the field during the early 21st century as well as the on-going diversity of approaches, presenting new perspectives and discoveries in ancient Mayan astronomy that result from recent studies of architectural alignments, codices, epigraphy, iconography, ethnography, and calendrics. More than just investigations of esoteric ancient sciences, studies of ancient Mayan astronomy have profoundly aided our understanding of Mayan worldviews. Concepts of time and space, meanings encoded in religious art, intentions underlying architectural alignments, and even methods of political legitimization are all illuminated through the study of Mayan astronomy.

Dancing Into Dreams

Maya Vase Painting of the Ik' Kingdom
Author: Bryan R. Just
Publisher: Princeton Univ Art Mus
ISBN: 9780300174380
Category: Art
Page: 252
View: 2079

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Dancing into Dreams explores 8th-century Maya vase painting of the Ik' kingdom, located in the tropical lowlands of present day Guatemala. Ik' vases are acclaimed for their naturalistic color, veristic portraiture, and calligraphic line. Their painted surfaces depict historical subject matter and often include the names of the artists and patrons, as well as hieroglyphic explanations of the portrayed events and vessel production. Collectively, such self-consciously historical works offer a precision and nuance, unparalleled in the ancient Americas, to the study of the role of art in elite society. Authoritative and accessible, this handsomely illustrated volume presents a history of Ik' vase painting and describes the dramatic scenes represented on the vases with compelling and historically accurate vignettes.

The Codex Borgia

A Full-Color Restoration of the Ancient Mexican Manuscript
Author: Gisele Díaz,Alan Rodgers
Publisher: Courier Corporation
ISBN: 0486155218
Category: Art
Page: 112
View: 7677

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First republication of remarkable repainting of great Mexican codex, dated to ca. AD 1400. 76 large full-color plates show gods, kings, warriors, mythical creatures, and abstract designs. Introduction.

Commoner Ritual and Ideology in Ancient Mesoamerica


Author: Nancy Gonlin,Jon C. Lohse
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Social Science
Page: 304
View: 7145

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Were most commoners in ancient Mesoamerica poor? In a material sense, yes, probably so. Were they poor in their beliefs and culture? Certainly not, as Commoner Ritual and Ideology in Ancient Mesoamerica demonstrates. This volume explores the ritual life of Mesoamerica's common citizens, inside and outside of the domestic sphere, from Formative through Postclassic periods. Building from the premise that ritual and ideological expression inhered at all levels of society in Mesoamerica, the contributors demonstrate that ideology did not emanate solely from exalted individuals and that commoner ritual expression was not limited to household contexts. Taking an empirical approach to this under-studied and under-theorized area, contributors use material evidence to discover how commoner status conditioned the expression of ideas and values. Revealing complex social hierarchies that varied across time and region, this volume offers theoretical approaches to commoner ideology, religious practice, and sociopolitical organization and builds a framework for future study of the correlation of ritual and ideological expression with social position for Mesoamericanists and archaeologists worldwide.

The Social Experience of Childhood in Ancient Mesoamerica


Author: Traci Ardren
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Social Science
Page: 309
View: 3405

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The first book to focus on children in ancient Mesoamerica, this vital reference for Mesoamericanists offers a methodological guide for archaeologists studying children and their roles in ancient societies worldwide.

Handbook to Life in the Ancient Maya World


Author: Lynn V. Foster
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195183634
Category: History
Page: 402
View: 5522

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This comprehensive and accessible reference explores the greatest and most mysterious of civilizations, hailed for its contributions to science, mathematics, and technology. Each chapter is supplemented by an extensive bibliography as well as photos, original line drawings, and maps.

Mesoamerican Ritual Economy

Archaeological and Ethnological Perspectives
Author: E. Christian Wells,Karla L. Davis-Salazar
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 336
View: 4255

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"Exploring the intersection of spirituality and materiality, Mesoamerican Ritual Economy will be of interest to all scholars studying how worldview and belief motivate economic behavior."--BOOK JACKET.

Ruins of the Past

The Use and Perception of Abandoned Structures in the Maya Lowlands
Author: Travis W. Stanton,Aline Magnoni
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 364
View: 4661

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From the Preclassic to the present, Maya peoples have continuously built, altered, abandoned, and re-used structures, imbuing them with new meanings at each transformation. RUINS OF THE PAST is the first volume to focus on how later Maya peoples perceived, used, and sometimes ritually destroyed ruins of structures built by ancestors.

After Monte Albán

Transformation and Negotiation in Oaxaca, Mexico
Author: Jeffrey Paul Blomster
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 438
View: 5021

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After Monte Albn reveals the richness and interregional relevance of Postclassic transformations in the area now known as Oaxaca. Large nucleated states throughout Oaxaca collapsed after C.E. 700, including the great Zapotec state centered in the Valley of Oaxaca, Monte Albn. Dramatic sociopolitical reconfigurations ensued. Oaxaca lies between central Mexico and the Maya area; contributors to After Monte Albn demonstrate Oaxacas cultural centrality in pan-Mesoamerican networks. Contributors synthesize regional transformations and continuities in the lower Rio Verde valley, the Valley of Oaxaca, and the Mixteca Alta. They provide data from material culture, architecture, codices, ethnohistoric documents, and ceramics, including a revised ceramic chronology from the Late Classic to the end of the Postclassic that will be crucial to future investigations. After Monte Albn establishes Postclassic Oaxacas central place in the study of Mesoamerican antiquity.

The Apotheosis of Janaab' Pakal

Science, History, and Religion at Classic Maya Palenque
Author: Gerardo Aldana y Villalobos
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 230
View: 1419

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Takes up anew the riddles within a number of Maya hieroglyphic inscriptions first recognised by Floyd Lounsbury. Gerardo Aldana unpacks these mathematical riddles using an approach grounded in a reading of the texts made possible by recent advances in decipherment. Using a history of science methodology, he expands upon (and sometimes questions) the foundational work of archaeoastronomers. Aldana follows three lines of investigation: a reading of the hieroglyphic inscriptions of the Classic period (ad250-900), mathematical analysis to recover Classic Maya astronomical practice, and a historiography of Maya astronomy. During troubled times in Palenque, Aldana contends, Kan Balam II devised a means to preserve the legitimacy of his ruling dynasty. He celebrated a re-creation of the city as a contemporary analogue of a mythical Creation on three levels: monumental construction for a public audience, artistic patronage for an elite audience, and a secret mathematical astronomical language only for rulers-elect. Discussing all of these efforts, Aldana focuses on the recovery of the secret language and its historical context.

Encounter with the Plumed Serpent

Drama and Power in the Heart of Mesoamerica
Author: Maarten Evert Reinoud Gerard Nicolaas Jansen,Gabina Aurora Pérez Jiménez
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 395
View: 9860

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In "Encounter with the Plumed Serpent, " two leading scholars present and interpret the sacred histories narrated in the Mixtec codices, the largest surviving collection of pre-Columbian manuscripts in existence. In these screenfold books, ancient painter-historians chronicled the politics of the Mixtec from approximately a.d. 900 to 1521, portraying the royal families, rituals, wars, alliances, and ideology of the times.

Painted Books and Indigenous Knowledge in Mesoamerica

Manuscript Studies in Honor of Mary Elizabeth Smith
Author: Elizabeth Hill Boone
Publisher: Tulane Univ Middle
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 446
View: 7695

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The volume, an homage to Mary Elizabeth Smith, contains twenty-five essays that focus on the art and intellectual culture of ancient Mesoamerica as that culture is revealed primarily in painted books or "codices" of the native tradition. The authors explore aspects of indigenous knowledge, such as religion and ritual, calendrical systems, rulership, and spatial and historical reckoning. Cultures treated include the Toltecs, as well as the Aztecs, Miktecs, Zapotecs, and Maya in the precolumbian and colonial periods.

Thunder doesn't live here anymore

the culture of marginality among the Teeneks of Tantoyuca
Author: Anath Ariel de Vidas
Publisher: Univ Pr of Colorado
ISBN: N.A
Category: Social Science
Page: 436
View: 9768

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Now available in English, Thunder Doesn't Live Here Anymore explores the highly unusual worldview of the Teenek people of Tantoyuca, Veracruz, whose self-deprecating cosmology diverges quite radically from patterns of positive cultural identity among other indigenous groups in Mexico. The Teeneks speak of themselves as dirty, dumb, ignorant, and fearful, a vocabulary that serves to justify the Teeneks' condition of social and spatial marginality in relation to their mestizo neighbors. However, as Anath Ariel de Vidas argues in this ethnography, this self-denigration - added to the absence among the Teeneks of emblematic Indian features such as traditional costumes, agricultural rituals, specific ceremonies, or systems of religious cargos or offices - are not synonymous with collective anomie. Rather, as Ariel de Vidas demonstrates, their seeming ontological acceptance of a marginal social and economic condition is - in its own peculiar way - a language of indigenous resistance.

Rabinal achi

a fifteenth-century Maya dynastic drama
Author: Alain Breton
Publisher: Univ Pr of Colorado
ISBN: N.A
Category: Drama
Page: 396
View: 9631

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The Rabinal Achi, one of the most remarkable works of Mayan literature, dates back to the 1400s. The drama is set in the Guatemalan highlands in the second half of the fifteenth century. In an exemplary trial that takes place in Kajyub, the capital of the Rabinaleb at that time, a captured enemy warrior (Quiché Achi) appears before the royal court. A series of combative dialogues pits the offending warrior against the local warrior (Rabinal Achi) and the king (Job Toj), reconstructing the deeds of those involved and retracing the antagonistic history of these two Mayan groups, the Quiché and the Rabinaleb. Alain Breton approaches the text from an anthropological and ethnographical perspective, demonstrating that this indigenous text reenacts pre-Columbian historic paradigms. Breton translated into French an entirely new transcription of the original text, and Teresa Lavender Fagan and Robert Schneider translated the text into English. Both the transcription and the translation are accompanied by detailed commentary and a glossary.

Invasion and Transformation

Interdisciplinary Perspectives on the Conquest of Mexico
Author: Rebecca Parker Brienen,Margaret Ann Jackson
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Art
Page: 231
View: 3420

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Invasion and Transformation examines the Spanish conquest of the Aztec Empire and transformations in political, social, cultural, and religious life in Mexico during the Conquest and the ensuing colonial period. In particular, contributors consider the ways in which the Conquest itself was remembered, both in its immediate aftermath and in later centuries. Was Moteuczoma really as weak as history portrayed him? As Susan D. Gillespie instead suggests in "Blaming Moteuczoma," the representation of Moteuczoma as a scapegoat for the Aztec defeat can be understood as a product of indigenous resistance and accommodation following the imposition of Spanish colonialism. Chapters address the various roles (real and imagined) of Moteuczoma, Cortés, and Malinche in the fall of the Aztecs; the representation of history in colonial art; and the complex cultural transformations that actually took place. Including full-color reproductions of seventeenth-century paintings of the Conquest, Invasion and Transformation will appeal to scholars and students of Latin American history and anthropology, art history, colonial literature, and transatlantic studies. Contributors include Rebecca P. Brienen, Louise M. Burkhart, Ximena Chávez Balderas, Constance Cortez, Viviana Diáz Balsera, Martha Few, Susan D. Gillespie, Margaret A. Jackson, Diana Magaloni Kerpel, Matthew Restall, Michael Schreffler.

The world below

body and cosmos in Otomí Indian ritual
Author: Jacques Galinier
Publisher: Univ Pr of Colorado
ISBN: N.A
Category: Social Science
Page: 271
View: 5388

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Jacques Galinier surveys both traditional Otomí cosmology and colonial and contemporary Catholic rituals to illustrate the complexity of continuity and change in Mesoamerican religious ideology and practice. Galinier explores the problems of historical and family memory, models of space and time, the role of the human habitation in cosmology, shamanism and healing, and much more. He elucidates the way these realities are represented in a series of arresting oppositions -- both Otomí oppositions and the duality of indigenous and Catholic ritual life -- between the upper and lower human body. As Galinier details, in Otomí cosmology, psychological forces are stored at the very bottom of the body -- 'the World Below' -- in what translates roughly as an 'Old Bag'. This spiritual sack is saturated with 'rottenness and sex' and invades the collective unconscious of the Otomí cosmos. Drawing upon both Freud and theories of the carnivalesque, Galinier argues that this world below provides the foundation for an indigenous metapsychology that is at once very close and very far away from the Freudian conceptual apparatus.