The Long Weekend

Life in the English Country House, 1918-1939
Author: Adrian Tinniswood
Publisher: Basic Books
ISBN: 0465098657
Category: History
Page: 344
View: 9847

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From an acclaimed social and architectural historian, the tumultuous, scandalous, glitzy, and glamourous history of English country houses and high society during the interwar period

The Long Weekend

Life in the English Country House Between the Wars
Author: Adrian Tinniswood
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 1448191246
Category: History
Page: 416
View: 5584

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'A masterpiece of social history' Daily Mail There is nothing quite as beautiful as an English country house in summer. And there has never been a summer quite like that Indian summer between the two world wars, a period of gentle decline in which the sun set slowly on the British Empire and the shadows lengthened on the lawns of a thousand stately homes. Real life in the country house during the 1920s and 1930s was not always so sunny. By turns opulent and ordinary, noble and vicious, its shadows were darker. In The Long Weekend, Adrian Tinniswood uncovers the truth about a world half-forgotten, draped in myth and hidden behind stiff upper lips and film-star smiles. Drawing on hundreds of memoirs, on unpublished letters and diaries, on the eye-witness testimonies of belted earls and unhappy heiresses and bullying butlers, The Long Weekend gives a voice to the people who inhabited this world and shows how the image of the country house was carefully protected by its occupants above and below stairs, and how the reality was so much more interesting than the dream.

Life in the English Country House

A Social and Architectural History
Author: Mark Girouard
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300058703
Category: History
Page: 344
View: 6712

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Based on the author's Slade lectures given at Oxford University in 1975-76.

The Long Week-end

A Social History of Great Britain, 1918-1939
Author: Robert Graves,Alan Hodge
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393311365
Category: History
Page: 472
View: 5653

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A classic social history by two distinguished writers who lived through the time. "The long week-end" is the authors' evocative phrase for the period in Great Britain's social history between the twin devastations of the Great War and World War II. From a postwar period of prosperity and frivolity through the ever-darkening decade of the thirties, The Long Week-End deftly and movingly preserves the details and captures the spirit of the time.

The Mistresses of Cliveden

Three Centuries of Scandal, Power, and Intrigue in an English Stately Home
Author: Natalie Livingstone
Publisher: Ballantine Books
ISBN: 0553392085
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 512
View: 6502

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For fans of Downton Abbey comes an immersive historical epic about a lavish English manor and a dynasty of rich and powerful women who ruled the estate over three centuries of misbehavior, scandal, intrigue, and passion. Five miles from Windsor Castle, home of the royal family, sits the Cliveden estate. Overlooking the Thames, the mansion is flanked by two wings and surrounded by lavish gardens. Throughout its storied history, Cliveden has been a setting for misbehavior, intrigue, and passion—from its salacious, deadly beginnings in the seventeenth century to the 1960s Profumo Affair, the sex scandal that toppled the British government. Now, in this immersive chronicle, the manor’s current mistress, Natalie Livingstone, opens the doors to this prominent house and lets the walls do the talking. Built during the reign of Charles II by the Duke of Buckingham, Cliveden attracted notoriety as a luxurious retreat in which the duke could conduct his scandalous affair with the ambitious courtesan Anna Maria, Countess of Shrewsbury. In 1668, Anna Maria’s cuckolded husband, the Earl of Shrewsbury, challenged Buckingham to a duel. Buckingham killed Shrewsbury and claimed Anna Maria as his prize, making her the first mistress of Cliveden. Through the centuries, other enigmatic and indomitable women would assume stewardship over the estate, including Elizabeth, Countess of Orkney and illicit lover of William III, who became one of England’s wealthiest women; Augusta of Saxe-Gotha, the queen that Britain was promised and then denied; Harriet, Duchess of Sutherland, confidante of Queen Victoria and a glittering society hostess turned political activist; and the American-born Nancy Astor, the first female member of Parliament, who described herself as an “ardent feminist” and welcomed controversy. Though their privileges were extraordinary, in Livingstone’s hands, their struggles and sacrifices are universal. Cliveden weathered renovation and restoration, world conflicts and cold wars, societal shifts and technological advances. Rich in historical and architectural detail, The Mistresses of Cliveden is a tale of sex and power, and of the exceptional women who evaded, exploited, and confronted the expectations of their times. Praise for The Mistresses of Cliveden “Theatrical festivities, political jockeying and court intrigues are deftly described with a verve and attention to domestic comforts that show the author at her best. . . . [Livingstone’s] portraits of strenuous and assertive women who resisted subjection, sometimes deploying their sexual allure to succeed, on other occasions drawing on their husband’s wealth, are astute, spirited, and empathetic.”—The Wall Street Journal “Missing Downton Abbey already? This tome promises ‘three centuries of scandal, power, and intrigue’ and Natalie Livingstone definitely delivers.”—Good Housekeeping “Lively . . . The current chatelaine—the author herself—deserves no small credit for keeping the house’s legend alive. . . . Any of her action-filled chapters would merit a mini-series.”—The New York Times Book Review “Though the personal tales and tidbits are fascinating, and the sensational details of these women’s lives will intrigue Downton Abbey devotees, the real star of the story is Cliveden.”—Booklist “Lovers of modern English history and the scandals that infiltrated upper-crust society will find much to enjoy in this work.”—Library Journal From the Hardcover edition.

Life in the Country House in Georgian Ireland


Author: Patricia McCarthy
Publisher: Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art
ISBN: 9780300218862
Category: Country homes
Page: 272
View: 9590

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"For aristocrats and gentry in 18th-century Ireland, the townhouses and country estates they resided in were carefully constructed to accommodate their cultivated lifestyles. Based on new research from Irish national collections and correspondence culled from papers in private keeping, this publication provides a vivid and engaging look at the various ways in which families tailored their homes to their personal needs and preferences. Halls were designed in order to simultaneously support a variety of activities, including dining, music, and games, while closed porches allowed visitors to arrive fully protected from the country's harsh weather. These grand houses were arranged in accordance with their residents' daily procedures, demonstrating a distinction between public and private spaces, and even keeping in mind the roles and arrangements of the servants in their purposeful layouts. With careful consideration given to both the practicality of everyday routine and the occasional special event, this book illustrates how the lives and residential structures of these aristocrats were inextricably woven together. "--

The Great Silence

Britain from the Shadow of the First World War to the Dawn of the Jazz Age
Author: Juliet Nicolson
Publisher: Open Road + Grove/Atlantic
ISBN: 0802197043
Category: History
Page: 304
View: 5130

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This account of British life in the wake of World War I is “social history at its very best . . . insightful and utterly absorbing” (Minneapolis Star-Tribune). As the euphoria of Armistice Day in 1918 quickly subsided, there was no denying the carnage that the Great War had left in its wake. Grief and shock overwhelmed the psyche of the British people—but from their despair, new life would slowly emerge. For veterans with faces demolished in the trenches, surgeon Harold Gillies brings hope with his miraculous skin-grafting procedure. Women win the vote, skirt hems leap, and Brits forget their troubles at packed dance halls. And two years later, the remains of a nameless combatant would be laid to rest in the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier at Westminster Abbey, as “The Great Silence,” observed in memory of the countless dead, halted citizens in silent reverence. This history of two transformative years in the life of a nation features countless characters, from an aging butler to a pair of newlyweds, from the Prince of Wales to T.E. Lawrence, the real-life Lawrence of Arabia. The Great Silence depicts a nation fighting the forces that threaten to tear it apart and discovering the common bonds that hold it together. “A pearl of anecdotal history, The Great Silence is a satisfying companion to major studies of World War I and its aftermath . . . as Nicolson proceeds through the familiar stages of grief—denial, anger and acceptance—she gives you a deeper understanding of not only this brief period, but also how war’s sacrifices don’t end after the fighting stops.” —The Seattle Times “It may make you cry.” —The Boston Globe

Modern Aristocrats

Ancestral Houses and Their Stories
Author: James Reginato
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780847848980
Category: Architecture
Page: 256
View: 6013

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This stunning book presents the intriguing stories and celebrated histories of some of the leading families of Great Britain and Ireland and the opulent residences that have defined their heritages. The history of England is inextricably linked with the stories of its leading aristocratic dynasties and the great seats they have occupied for centuries. As the current owners speak of the critical roles their ancestors have played in the nation, they bring history alive. All of these houses have survived great wars, economic upheavals, and, at times, scandal. Filled with stunning photography, this book is a remarkably intimate and lively look inside some of Britain’s stateliest houses, with the modern-day aristocrats who live in them and keep them going in high style.This book presents a tour of some of England’s finest residences, with many of the interiors shown here for the first time. It includes Blenheim Palace—seven acres under one roof, eclipsing the splendor of any of the British royal family’s residences—property of the Dukes of Marlborough; the exquisite Old Vicarage in Derbyshire, last residence of the late Dowager Duchess of Devonshire (née Deborah Mitford); Haddon Hall, a vast crenellated 900-year-old manor house belonging to the Dukes of Rutland that has been called the most romantic house in England; and the island paradises on Mustique and St. Lucia of the 3rd Baron Glenconner. This book is perfect for history buffs and lovers of traditional interior design and English country life."

Carlton House

The Past Glories of George IV's Palace
Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Art
Page: 240
View: 2181

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Children of the Sun

A Narrative of "decadence" in England After 1918
Author: Martin Green
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781604190014
Category: History
Page: 518
View: 5946

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Children of the Sun is a story of brilliant and later famous young people who deliberately chose decadence as an alternative lifestyle. The setting is England between World War I and World War II. The cast of characters includes Evelyn Waugh, Randolph Churchill, W. H. Auden, Christopher Isherwood, and Cecil Beaton among others.

Under Live Oaks

The Last Great Houses of the Old South
Author: Caroline Seebohm
Publisher: Clarkson Potter Publishers
ISBN: N.A
Category: Architecture
Page: 304
View: 1633

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More than two hundred full-color photographs capture the rich beauty of the old homes and plantations of the American South, accompanied by a vivid look at the history of the families who have owned these antebellum treasures for generations, providing a poignant, elegant look at a vanishing way of life. 15,000 first printing.

Great Houses of England & Wales


Author: Hugh Montgomery-Massingberd,Christopher Simon Sykes
Publisher: Laurence King Publishing
ISBN: 1856690539
Category: Country Houses
Page: 424
View: 3214

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Records thirty-two of the most important estates in words and photographs

Requisitioned

The British Country House in the Second World War
Author: John Martin Robinson
Publisher: Aurum Press Limited
ISBN: 9781781310953
Category: Architecture
Page: 192
View: 439

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This book profiles 20 country houses and their fate during WW2, from schools (Chatsworth) to hospitals to barracks (Eaton Hall) to storing the National Art Collection (Penrhyn Castle). Wide geographical spread, including Scotland (where the SOE trained in West Coast castles like Rosneath) and Wales. Some houses have since been restored to former glory, like Arundel, some are famous only as a result of their wartime role - Bletchley Park - and others have been destroyed for ever.

The Optimist's Daughter


Author: Eudora Welty
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 067972883X
Category: Fiction
Page: 180
View: 7298

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Laurel Hand is forced to face her Southern past when she returns to Mississippi for her father's funeral

Victorians Undone

Tales of the Flesh in the Age of Decorum
Author: Kathryn Hughes
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 142142570X
Category: History
Page: 432
View: 539

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In lively, accessible prose, Victorians Undone fills the space where the body ought to be, proposing new ways of thinking and writing about flesh in the nineteenth century.

Golden

Sweet & Savory Baked Delights from the Ovens of London¿s Honey & Co.
Author: Itamar Srulovich,Sarit Packer
Publisher: Little, Brown
ISBN: 031654485X
Category: Cooking
Page: 304
View: 5382

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"I want to make every recipe in this book. . . . And you should, too!"--David Lebovitz, author of My Paris Kitchen and Ready for Dessert Comforting breads, buns, pastries, cakes, cookies, and other baked delights from the Middle East There's always something sweet in the oven at Honey & Co., the tiny restaurant in London where the day is marked by what comes out of the pastry section. In the morning, sticky buns are stuffed full of cherries and pistachios; loaves of rich dough are rolled with chocolate, hazelnuts, and cinnamon. Lunch is a crisp, crumbly shell of pastry filled with spiced lamb or burnt eggplant, and at teatime there are cheesecakes and fruitcakes, small cakes, and massive cookies-so many treats that it's hard to choose one. And after dinner? Poached peaches with roses, something sweet and salty drenched in orange blossom syrup, or maybe even a piece of fresh marzipan. This is the magic of Middle Eastern soul food. This is Golden. Previously published in the United Kingdom as Honey and Co: The Baking Book

Oppenheimer

The Tragic Intellect
Author: Charles Thorpe
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226798486
Category: Science
Page: 384
View: 7874

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At a time when the Manhattan Project was synonymous with large-scale science, physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer (1904–67) represented the new sociocultural power of the American intellectual. Catapulted to fame as director of the Los Alamos atomic weapons laboratory, Oppenheimer occupied a key position in the compact between science and the state that developed out of World War II. By tracing the making—and unmaking—of Oppenheimer’s wartime and postwar scientific identity, Charles Thorpe illustrates the struggles over the role of the scientist in relation to nuclear weapons, the state, and culture. A stylish intellectual biography, Oppenheimer maps out changes in the roles of scientists and intellectuals in twentieth-century America, ultimately revealing transformations in Oppenheimer’s persona that coincided with changing attitudes toward science in society. “This is an outstandingly well-researched book, a pleasure to read and distinguished by the high quality of its observations and judgments. It will be of special interest to scholars of modern history, but non-specialist readers will enjoy the clarity that Thorpe brings to common misunderstandings about his subject.”—Graham Farmelo, Times Higher Education Supplement “A fascinating new perspective. . . . Thorpe’s book provides the best perspective yet for understanding Oppenheimer’s Los Alamos years, which were critical, after all, not only to his life but, for better or worse, the history of mankind.”—Catherine Westfall, Nature

Making Monte Carlo

A History of Speculation and Spectacle
Author: Mark Braude
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 147670970X
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 304
View: 4803

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"A rollicking narrative history of Jazz Age Monte Carlo, chronicling the city's rise from WWI's ashes to become one of the world's most storied, infamous playgrounds of the rich, only to be crushed under it's own weight ten years later"--Provided by publisher.