The Landscape Archaeology of Anglo-Saxon England


Author: N. J. Higham,Martin J. Ryan
Publisher: Boydell & Brewer
ISBN: 1843835827
Category: History
Page: 231
View: 1783

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The Anglo-Saxon period was crucial to the development of the English landscape, but is rarely studied. The essays here provide radical new interpretations of its development.

The Material Culture of the Built Environment in the Anglo-Saxon World


Author: Gale Owen-Crocker,Maren Clegg Hyer
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 1781384460
Category: History
Page: 398
View: 8071

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The Material Culture of the Built Environment in the Anglo-Saxon World, second volume of Daily Living in the Anglo-Saxon World, continues to introduce students of Anglo-Saxon culture to aspects of the realities of the built environment that surrounded Anglo-Saxon peoples through reference to archaeological and textual sources. It considers what structures intruded on the natural landscape the Anglo-Saxons inhabited - roads and tracks, ancient barrows and Roman buildings, the villages and towns, churches, beacons, boundary ditches and walls, grave-markers and standing sculptures - and explores the interrelationships between them and their part in Anglo-Saxon life.

The Early Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms of Southern Britain AD 450-650

Beneath the Tribal Hidage
Author: Sue Harrington,Martin Welch
Publisher: Oxbow Books
ISBN: 1782976159
Category: History
Page: 240
View: 1097

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The Tribal Hidage, attributed to the 7th century, records the named groups and polities of early Anglo-Saxon England and the taxation tribute due from their lands and surpluses. Whilst providing some indication of relative wealth and its distribution, rather little can be deduced from the Hidage concerning the underlying economic and social realities of the communities documented. Sue Harrington and the late Martin Welch have adopted a new approach to these issues, based on archaeological information from 12,000 burials and 28,000 objects of the period AD 450_650. The nature, distribution and spatial relationships of settlement and burial evidence are examined over time against a background of the productive capabilities of the environment in which they are set, the availability of raw materials, evidence for metalworking and other industrial/craft activities, and communication and trade routes. This has enabled the identification of central areas of wealth that influenced places around them. Key within this period was the influence of the Franks who may have driven economic exploitation by building on the pre-existing Roman infrastructure of the south-east. Frankish material culture was as widespread as that of the Kentish people, whose wealth is evident in many well-furnished graves, but more nuanced approaches to wealth distribution are apparent further to the West, perhaps due to ongoing interaction with communities who maintained an essentially ïRomano-BritishÍ way of life.

King Harold II and the Bayeux Tapestry


Author: Gale R. Owen-Crocker
Publisher: Boydell Press
ISBN: 1843836157
Category: History
Page: 202
View: 9191

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Essays on the brief but tumultuous reign of Harold II, and one of our most important sources of knowledge of the time - the Bayeux Tapestry.

Altertumskunde – Altertumswissenschaft – Kulturwissenschaft

Erträge und Perspektiven nach 40 Jahren Reallexikon der Germanischen Altertumskunde
Author: Heinrich Beck,Dieter Geuenich,Heiko Steuer
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter
ISBN: 3110273616
Category: History
Page: 800
View: 8130

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2007 saw the completion of the Reallexikon der Germanischen Altertumskunde. This volume takes stock of developments and brings together the fields of archeology, history, philology and numerous natural sciences. The themes in the book address current topics, methods and new sources.

Place-names, Language and the Anglo-Saxon Landscape


Author: N. J. Higham,Martin J. Ryan
Publisher: Boydell Press
ISBN: 1843836033
Category: History
Page: 245
View: 1809

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An exploration of the landscape of Anglo-Saxon England, particularly through the prism of place-names and what they can reveal.

Landscape History

Journal of the Society for Landscape Studies
Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Land settlement patterns
Page: N.A
View: 6828

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Village, Hamlet and Field

Changing Medieval Settlements in Central England
Author: Carenza Lewis
Publisher: Windgather Press
ISBN: N.A
Category: Social Science
Page: 255
View: 7480

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Why is the countryside in some parts of England and Continental Europe dominated by large villages, while in many regions looser groupings of houses in hamlets, or isolated farms, provide the main forms of settlement? The answer lies in the period c.850-1200, when the settlement pattern which still survives was created.

Early Medieval Mortuary Practices


Author: Sarah Semple,Howard Williams
Publisher: Oxbow Books
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 350
View: 6474

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Volume 14 of the Anglo-Saxon Studies in Archaeology and History series is dedicated to the archaeology of early medieval death, burial and commemoration. Incorporating studies focusing upon Anglo-Saxon England as well as research encompassing western Britain, Continental Europe and Scandinavia, this volume originated as the proceedings of a two-day conference held at the University of Exeter in February 2004. It comprises of an Introduction that outlines the key debates and new approaches in early medieval mortuary archaeology followed by eighteen innovative research papers offering new interpretations of the material culture, monuments and landscape context of early medieval mortuary practices. Papers contribute to a variety of ongoing debates including the study of ethnicity, religion, ideology and social memory from burial evidence. The volume also contains two cemetery reports of early Anglo-Saxon cemeteries from Cambridgeshire.

A Neolithic and Bronze Age Landscape in Northhamptonshire


Author: Jan Harding,Frances Healy,Aidan Allen
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Bronze age
Page: 324
View: 3619

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The Raunds Area Project investigated more than 20 Neolithic and Bronze Age monuments in the Nene Valley. From c 5000 BC to the early 1st millennium cal BC a succession of ritual mounds and burial mounds were built as settlement along the valley sides increased and woodland was cleared.Starting as a regular stopping-place for flint knapping and domestic tasks, first the Long Mound, and then Long Barrow, the north part of the Turf Mound and the Avenue were built in the 5th millennium BC. With the addition of the Long Enclosure, the Causewayed Ring Ditch, and the Southern Enclosure, there was a chain of five or six diverse monuments stretched along the river bank by c 3000 cal BC. Later, a timber platform, the Riverside Structure, was built and the focus of ceremonial activity shifted to the Cotton 'Henge', two concentric ditches on the occupied valley side.From c 2200 cal BC monument building accelerated and included the Segmented Ditch Circle and at least 20 round barrows, almost all containing burials, at first inhumations, then cremations down to c 1000 cal BC, by which time two overlapping systems of paddocks and droveways had been laid out. Finally, the terrace began to be settled when these had gone out of use, in the early 1st millennium cal BC.

Mapping Ancient Landscapes in Northamptonshire


Author: Alison Deegan,Glenn Foard
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Cultural geography
Page: 171
View: 7350

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Aerial reconnaissance and the National Mapping Programme project in Northamptonshire have recovered and mapped evidence of archaeological activity of widely varying character, from field systems through settlement remains to funerary monuments, and ranging in period from the Neolithic to the 20th century.This volume presents research and analyses the project’s results. The introduction is followed by two chapters that consider the reasons for the biases in the distribution of aerial photographic evidence. The first of these chapters reviews the history of aerial reconnaissance and mapping in Northamptonshire. The second considers the impact of soils, geology and past and present land use on the survival and visibility of earthworks, crop marks and soil marks.The subsequent analyses of the project’s results are presented primarily by period. First there is a discussion of the monuments and landscapes of the Neolithic and Bronze Age in the context of results from archaeological excavations, and in particular from the Raunds Area Project. This is followed by a review of the wider evidence for these periods in Northamptonshire and the Midlands by Alex Gibson.Reflecting the wealth of information revealed by aerial archaeology for these periods, a large proportion of this volume in concentrated on the Iron Age and Roman periods, in an attempt to characterise the settlements, boundaries and communications across different landscape zones. The three chapters on the Anglo-Saxon, medieval and post-medieval landscapes, and on 20th-century military remains review the contribution of the aerial archaeological evidence and consider whether this was maximised by the project.The final chapter assesses the methodology that evolved during the course of the project and its impact on data creation and subsequent data manipulation, interrogation and dissemination.The Northamptonshire National Mapping Programme data is archived by and disseminated through the National Monuments Record, Northamptonshire Sites and Monuments Record and also the Archaeology Data Service, York.

Elves in Anglo-Saxon England

Matters of Belief, Health, Gender and Identity
Author: Alaric Hall
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 226
View: 6734

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Elves and elf-belief during the Anglo-Saxon period are reassessed in this lively and provocative study.

A Frontier Landscape

The North West in the Middle Ages
Author: N. J. Higham
Publisher: Windgather Press
ISBN: 9780954557560
Category: History
Page: 273
View: 6534

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North west England has largely been neglected in studies of medieval landscapes in favour of the Midlands and East Anglia although it has much to offer. Described here as a `frontier landscape' encompassing the modern regions of Lancashire, Cheshire, Merseyside and Greater Manchester, the author discusses changes to the medieval landscape and why these occurred. He outlines and characterises the major period of expansion and economic boom that took place in the north west from 1086 to 1349 and asks why political and military matters seen to have had such an important role in landscape change. Issues of perceived marginality are also discussed as Higham looks in turn at the local population and their environment, land use and agrarian practices, woodland, forest and pasture, buildings, farms and estates, markets and fairs and the Church and the landscape. A great addition to the series.

Current Research in Britain

CRB.. Social sciences
Author: Cartermill International Limited,LONGMAN CARTERMILL (FIRM)
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780582209213
Category: Social sciences
Page: 768
View: 6726

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Excavations at Barrow Hills, Radley, Oxfordshire: The Neolithic and Bronze Age monument complex


Author: Alistair Barclay
Publisher: Oxford Univ School of Archaeology
ISBN: 9780947816889
Category: Social Science
Page: 268
View: 6937

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The Anglo-Saxon cemetery comprised a maximum of 219 individuals in 199 graves and 29 cremation deposits. In addition these were three probable charnel deposits and an empty grave. The cemetery is probably the wealthiest ever excavated in the upper Thames Valley. The assemblage comprised literally thousands of objects, some of which were rare or indeed unique within England. The associated grave goods suggest that the cemetery was in use from the mid or late 5th century until the late 7th century. The prehistoric remains comprised an early Bronze Age ring ditch, several cremations, a series of linear boundaries of late Bronze Age/early Iron Age date, a roundhouse, one 4-post structure amd a scatter of pits and post-holes. Roman activity was represented by several quarry pits, a large ditch orientated north-east to south-west, and several smaller ditches.