The International Criminal Court in an Effective Global Justice System


Author: Linda E. Carter,Mark S. Ellis,Charles Chernor Jalloh
Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing
ISBN: 178471982X
Category:
Page: 384
View: 3593

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International tribunals need to interface effectively with national jurisdictions, which includes coordination with domestic judicial prosecutions as well as an appreciation for other non-judicial types of transitional justice. In this book, the authors analyze the earlier international tribunals established since the 1990s and the parallel national proceedings for each. In examining the ways in which the ICC can best coordinate with national processes this book considers the ICC’s present interactions with national jurisdictions and the statutory framework of the Rome Statute for interface with national jurisdictions.

New Zealand Yearbook of International Law


Author: N.A
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004345914
Category: Law
Page: 386
View: 6254

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The New Zealand Yearbook of International Law provides legal materials and critical commentary on issues of international law, addressing trends, state practice and policies in the development of international law in New Zealand, the South Pacific, Antarctica and globally. This Yearbook covers the period 1 January 2016 to 31 December 2016.

Towards Global Justice: Sovereignty in an Interdependent World


Author: Simona Ţuţuianu
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9067048917
Category: Law
Page: 278
View: 2672

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With Forewords by Geoffrey Robertson QC, Doughty Street Chambers, London, UK and Professor Mihail E. Ionescu, Bucharest, Romania Simona Ţuţuianu describes a new model of sovereignty which is fast replacing the traditional Westphalian model embodied in Article 2 of the UN Charter and rigorously followed throughout the Cold War. The scholarly basis for this new model draws upon developments in international criminal law which first emerged from the Nuremberg trials and upon more recent interstate economic cooperation which has turned sovereign independence into interdependence across a range of state functions. Does this mean that traditional Westphalian concepts of sovereignty should be abandoned in constructing a new theory of world governance for the twenty-first century? Not at all. A new model, which can be called the pattern of interdependence-based sovereignty, serves to explain contemporary events that puzzle traditional theorists, such as the war over Kosovo, the invasions of Iraq and Libya, the emergence of a “Responsibility to protect” doctrine and its recent validation in Security Council Resolutions 1970 and 1973. We are witnessing the emergence of a new philosophy of action, which is in the process of producing a 21st century system of international relations. The Book will appeal to academics, students and postgraduates studying international affairs, politics, international law, diplomatic history, or war and/or peace studies. It is particularly of interest for NATO establishments and national military schools, while experts and scholars will value its theory of what sovereignty means today. The Book offers a multidisciplinary approach which underpins a new theory of how human rights can be better protected in a better world. There is a unique case study of cooperative security in the Greater Black Sea Area, by one of the few experts on the politics of this region. It will be read and appreciated by those who need to understand how modern international law and diplomacy really work. Journalists, media commentators, human rights NGOs, aid agencies, diplomats and government officials need the information in this Book.

International Prosecution of Human Rights Crimes


Author: Wolfgang Kaleck,Michael Ratner,Tobias Singelnstein,Peter Weiss
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 3540462783
Category: Law
Page: 224
View: 1314

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The book explores recent developments in the international and national prosecution of persons accused of committing war crimes and crimes against humanity. It considers the relationship between national and international law, science and practice, with emphasis on the emerging principle of universial jurisdiction and the effect of "the war on terror" on legal norms.

Shifting Global Powers and International Law

Challenges and Opportunities
Author: Rowena Maguire,Bridget Lewis,Charles Sampford
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135017492
Category: Political Science
Page: 272
View: 5059

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This book explores the impacts of global economic, political and cultural shifts on various international legal frameworks and legal norms. The economic growth of states throughout Asia, South and Central America and Africa is having a profound effect on the dynamics of international relations, with a resulting impact on the operation and development of international law. This book examines the influence of emerging economies on international legal rules, institutions and processes. It describes recent and predicted changes in economic, political and cultural powers, flowing from the growth of emerging economies such as China, India, Brazil, South Africa and Russia, and analyses the influence of these changes on various legal frameworks and norms. Expert contributors drawn from a variety of fields, including international law, politics, environmental law, human rights, economics and finance, provide a broad analysis of the nature of the shifting global dynamic in its historical and contemporary contexts, and a range of perspectives on the impact of these changes as they relate to specific regimes and issues, including climate change regulation, collective security, indigenous rights, the rights of women and girls, environmental protection and foreign aid and development. The book provides a fresh and comprehensive analysis of an issue with extensive implications for international law and politics. Shifting Global Powers and International Law will be of interest to students and scholars of international relations; international law; international political economy, human rights; and development.

Pluralism in International Criminal Law


Author: Elies van Sliedregt,Sergey Vasiliev
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 019100829X
Category: Law
Page: 410
View: 1565

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Despite the growth in international criminal courts and tribunals, the majority of cases concerning international criminal law are prosecuted at the domestic level. This means that both international and domestic courts have to contend with a plethora of relevant, but often contradictory, judgments by international institutions and by other domestic courts. This book provides a detailed investigation into the impact this pluralism has had on international criminal law and procedure, and examines the key problems which arise from it. The work identifies the various interpretations of the concept of pluralism and discusses how it manifests in a broad range of aspects of international criminal law and practice. These include substantive jurisdiction, the definition of crimes, modes of individual criminal responsibility for international crimes, sentencing, fair trial rights, law of evidence, truth-finding, and challenges faced by both international and domestic courts in gathering, testing and evaluating evidence. Authored by leading practitioners and academics in the field, the book employs pluralism as a methodological tool to advance the debate beyond the classic view of 'legal pluralism' leading to a problematic fragmentation of the international legal order. It argues instead that pluralism is a fundamental and indispensable feature of international criminal law which permeates it on several levels: through multiple legal regimes and enforcement fora, diversified sources and interpretations of concepts, and numerous identities underpinning the law and practice. The book addresses the virtues and dangers of pluralism, reflecting on the need for, and prospects of, harmonization of international criminal law around a common grammar. It ultimately brings together the theories of legal pluralism, the comparative law discourse on legal transplants, harmonization, and convergence, and the international legal debate on fragmentation to show where pluralism and divergence will need to be accepted as regular, and even beneficial, features of international criminal justice.

Global Justice

A Cosmopolitan Account
Author: Gillian Brock
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191552313
Category: Philosophy
Page: 384
View: 4858

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Gillian Brock develops a viable cosmopolitan model of global justice that takes seriously the equal moral worth of persons, yet leaves scope for defensible forms of nationalism and for other legitimate identifications and affiliations people have. Brock addresses two prominent kinds of skeptic about global justice: those who doubt its feasibility and those who believe that cosmopolitanism interferes illegitimately with the defensible scope of nationalism by undermining goods of national importance, such as authentic democracy or national self-determination. The model addresses concerns about implementation in the world, showing how we can move from theory to public policy that makes progress toward global justice. It also makes clear how legitimate forms of nationalism are compatible with commitments to global justice. Global Justice is divided into three central parts. In the first, Brock defends a cosmopolitan model of global justice. In the second, which is largely concerned with public policy issues, she argues that there is much we can and should do toward achieving global justice. She addresses several pressing problems, discussing both theoretical and public policy issues involved with each. These include tackling global poverty, taxation reform, protection of basic liberties, humanitarian intervention, immigration, and problems associated with global economic arrangements. In the third part, she shows how the discussion of public policy issues can usefully inform our theorizing; in particular, it assists our thinking about the place of nationalism and equality in an account of global justice.

Power and Justice in International Relations

Interdisciplinary Approaches to Global Challenges
Author: Dr Andreas Oberprantacher,Ms Marie-Luisa Frick
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 1409499383
Category: Political Science
Page: 284
View: 6362

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Outstanding and thought-provoking, this book provides up-to-date and in-depth analyses of current developments in international politics. It highlights the (unilateral) use of force in international relations and its implication for international law, the chances and risks of international criminal justice, and the question of epistemic violence with regard to dominant discourses in the theory of international relations, such as nation-building and intercultural dialogue. Furthermore, the book focuses on conditions for global social and ecological justice in international economics against the background of financial crisis. It contributes in particular to a better understanding of the relation between power and justice in view of current global tensions while reflecting the work of the internationally acclaimed philosopher Hans Köchler.

International and Comparative Criminal Justice

A critical introduction
Author: Mark J. Findlay
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136184155
Category: Social Science
Page: 352
View: 1419

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International criminal justice is in transition. This book explores the growing internationalisation of criminal justice as a phenomenon of global governance. It provides students with a critical understanding of the international institutions for regulating transnational crime, the development of alternative justice processes across the globe, and international and supra-national co-operation criminal justice policies and practices. Key topics covered include: The historical development of International Criminal Justice institutions and traditions International Restorative Justice Victim communities and collaborative justice The relationship between crime and war International Human Rights The ‘War on Terror’ The globalisation of crime and control Developments in global governance, communitarian justice and accountability This text will familiarize students with the literature and debates surrounding international criminal justice and enable them to critically appreciate their theoretical and policy context. In doing so, it encourages students to assess the strengths and weaknesses of different approaches to the study of global justice and the analysis of comparative policy convergence and research. It will also help students to reflect on, and communicate in an informed and critical way theoretical accounts and empirical studies within the field of international criminal justice. This book will be essential reading for upper level undergraduates taking courses in criminal law, international relations and governance and postgraduates engaged in international criminal justice, international law, regulation and governance and human rights.

The Effectiveness of International Criminal Justice


Author: Cedric Ryngaert
Publisher: Intersentia Uitgevers N V
ISBN: N.A
Category: Law
Page: 278
View: 2388

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"This volume is an offshoot of the research activities of working group II ('international criminal tribunals') of the European Science Foundation's COST A28 Action on Human Rights, Peace and Security in EU Foreign Policy"--P. v.

The International Criminal Court and National Courts

A Contentious Relationship
Author: Nidal Nabil Jurdi
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 140949747X
Category: Law
Page: 332
View: 405

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This book analyzes the position of the ICC in relation to national court systems. The research illustrates that what seemed to be a straight forward relationship between the ICC and national courts under the complementarity mechanism, proves to be much more complex in practice. Using the referrals of Uganda and Darfur, the book demonstrates ways in which it might be possible to prosecute for crimes currently not prosecuted by the ICC and brings to light possible solutions to overcome the gaps in law and practice in the jurisdictional relation between the ICC and national systems. It will be of value to academics, students and policy-makers working in the area of international law, international organizations, and human rights.

Domestic Law Goes Global

Legal Traditions and International Courts
Author: Sara McLaughlin Mitchell,Emilia Justyna Powell
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139501194
Category: Political Science
Page: N.A
View: 6642

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International courts have proliferated in the international system, with over one hundred judicial or quasi-judicial bodies in existence today. This book develops a rational legal design theory of international adjudication in order to explain the variation in state support for international courts. Initial negotiators of new courts, 'originators', design international courts in ways that are politically and legally optimal. States joining existing international courts, 'joiners', look to the legal rules and procedures to assess the courts' ability to be capable, fair and unbiased. The authors demonstrate that the characteristics of civil law, common law and Islamic law influence states' acceptance of the jurisdiction of international courts, the durability of states' commitments to international courts, and the design of states' commitments to the courts. Furthermore, states strike cooperative agreements most effectively in the shadow of an international court that operates according to familiar legal principles and rules.

The International Criminal Court and the End of Impunity in Kenya


Author: Lionel Nichols
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319107291
Category: Political Science
Page: 267
View: 6070

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The period immediately following Kenya's 2007 presidential election left a shocking trail of atrocities, with over 1,000 people dead and countless thousands left victimised and displaced. In response, the International Criminal Court began a series of investigations and trials, promising no impunity for even the highest ranking perpetrators. When the country's president and vice-president were implicated in the crimes, the case took on worldwide significance. The International Criminal Court and the End of Impunity in Kenya is a five-year study addressing critical human rights issues with a global reach and is the first detailed account of the ICC's intervention in Kenya. It probes the relationship between the ICC and state institutions, known as positive complementarity, and asks whether the ICC's intervention led to an end to impunity. The author provides comprehensive analysis of the Waki Commission's sealed envelope, the government's attempts to establish a special tribunal and the trials in The Hague. He also provides in depth consideration of any influence the ICC's intervention may have had on the passing of a new constitution, the establishment of a truth commission and important reforms to the judiciary, police and witness protection programme. Documenting the effects of these interventions on the Kenyan people, and on the country's legal and judicial systems, the book provides vital lessons in global justice as it: •Details the ICC's involvement in Kenya in the aftermath of extreme violence and instability •Evaluates the ICC prosecutor's strategy of positive complementarity •Identifies optimal conditions for positive complementarity to be effective •Links cultures of impunity to state-sponsored corruption •Explores the possible impact of the ICC on national and global policy •Discusses implications in responding to future crimes against humanity Replete with official government sources, The International Criminal Court and the End of Impunity in Kenya is necessary reading for researchers and practitioners working in public international law, particularly those specialising in conflict and post-conflict states.

Learning in Modern International Society

On the Cognitive Problem Solving Abilities of Political Actors
Author: Claudia Hofmann
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 9783531907895
Category: Political Science
Page: 159
View: 9861

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Claudia Hofmann engages in a theoretical modelling of international learning processes and the substantiation of this model through three cases from international politics. She answers two questions: How may international actors learn as a collective? And how may the lessons learned influence actor behaviour and problem solving processes? As a foundation for answering these questions she examines the nature of actor behaviour within a social international system and integrates the diffusion of norms and values among macro-level actors.

Peace and Justice at the International Criminal Court

A Court of Last Resort
Author: Errol Mendes
Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing
ISBN: 1849807027
Category: Law
Page: 215
View: 2083

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Errol Mendes spent nearly a year as a Visiting Professional with the Prosecutor of the International Criminal Court. This has given him a unique perspective and some special insight into the big situations confronting the Court, including Darfur, Palestine and Uganda. William A. Schabas, National University of Ireland, Galway This authoritative book addresses the greatest challenge facing the International Criminal Court since its historic establishment in 1998: reconciling the demand for justice for the most serious crimes known to humanity with the promotion of sustainable peace in conflict areas around the world. In describing and analyzing this challenge, Errol Mendes demonstrates that the Court is a product of centuries of global efforts to integrate peace with justice. Focusing on two important prosecutions involving indictments of the president and other senior officials of Sudan and a savage rebel group in Northern Uganda, the author argues that the choice between peace and justice is not a zero sum game. Based on knowledge and experience obtained during his time as a visiting professional at the Court, the author combines insights from Court leaders with his own analysis in his call for greater international cooperation with the Court in fulfilling its mandate and overcoming other obstacles that threaten its work into the future. Scholars and students of criminal justice, international studies, political science and human rights, as well as civil society groups, government officials and those working with international justice organizations, will find in this book a unique and sophisticated perspective on this complex dilemma.

Transnational Environmental Crime

Toward an Eco-global Criminology
Author: Rob White
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136637583
Category: Social Science
Page: 192
View: 3349

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This book provides a comprehensive introduction to and overview of eco-global criminology. Eco-global criminology refers to a criminological approach that is informed by ecological considerations and by a critical analysis that is global in scale and perspective. Based upon eco-justice conceptions of harm, it focuses on transgressions against environments, non-human species and humans. At the centre of eco-global criminology is analysis of transnational environmental crime. This includes crimes related to pollution (of air, water and land) and crimes against wildlife (including illegal trade in ivory as well as live animals). It also includes those harms that pose threats to the environment more generally (such as global warming). In addressing these issues, the book deals with topics such as the conceptualization of environmental crime or harm, the researching of transnational environmental harm, climate change and social conflict, threats to biodiversity, toxic waste and the transference of harm, prosecution and sentencing of environmental crimes, and environmental victimization and transnational activism. This book argues that analysis of transnational environmental crime needs to incorporate different notions of harm, and that the overarching perspective of eco-global criminology provides the framework for this. Transnational Environmental Crime will be an essential resource for students, academics, policy-makers, environmental managers, police, magistrates and others with a general interest in environmental issues.

Assessing the Effectiveness of International Courts


Author: Yuval Shany
Publisher: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191640212
Category: Law
Page: 360
View: 3139

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Are international courts effective tools for international governance? Do they fulfill the expectations that led to their creation and empowerment? Why do some courts appear to be more effective than others, and do so such appearances reflect reality? Could their results have been produced by other mechanisms? This book evaluates the effectiveness of international courts and tribunals by comparing their stated goals to the actual outcomes they achieve. Using a theoretical model borrowed from social science, the book assesses their effectiveness by analysing key empirical data. Its first part is dedicated to theory and methodology, laying out the effectiveness model, explaining its different components, its promise and limits, and discussing the measurement challenges it faces. The second part analyses the role that indicators such as jurisdiction, judicial independence, legitimacy, and compliance play in achieving effectiveness. Part three applies the effectiveness model to the International Court of Justice, the WTO dispute settlement mechanisms (panels and Appellate Body), the International Criminal Court, the European Court of Human Rights, and the European Court of Justice, reflecting the diversity of the field of international adjudication. Given the recent proliferation of international courts and tribunals, this book makes an important contribution towards understanding and measuring the value that these institutions provide.

The Globalization Reader


Author: Frank J. Lechner,John Boli
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118737024
Category: Political Science
Page: 624
View: 1554

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Completely revised and updated, the fifth edition of thiswell-regarded textbook charts key topics and recent research inglobalization along with the latest complexities and controversiesin the field. Includes a new section on globalization and identity and newreadings on global inequality, mental illness, structural violence,microfinance, blood diamonds, world citizenship, the global justicemovement, and sumo wrestling Contains essential, thought-provoking readings by prominentscholars, activists, and organizations on the many dimensions ofglobalization, from political and economic issues to cultural andexperiential ones Examines foundational topics, such as the experience ofglobalization, economic and political globalization, the role ofmedia and religion in cultural globalization, women’s rights,environmentalism, global civil society, and the alternativeglobalization movement Retains the helpful student features from prior editions,including an accessible format, concise introductions to majortopics, stimulating examples, and discussion questions for eachselection and section