The Human Species: An Introduction to Biological Anthropology


Author: John Relethford
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Education
ISBN: 9780078034985
Category: Social Science
Page: 544
View: 6819

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In its ninth edition, The Human Species continues to provide a comprehensive approach to biological anthropology, especially the relationship between biology and culture, behavior in an evolutionary context, and humans as a species within the primate order. With its lively narrative and emphasis on the most current topics and findings in the field, The Human Species explores the major questions that concern biological anthropologists about our species.

The Human Species

An Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Author: John Relethford
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Humanities, Social Sciences & World Languages
ISBN: 9780073405261
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 494
View: 4289

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This text introduces physical anthropology, the science of human biological evolution and variation. It addresses the major questions that concern biological anthropologists: "What are humans?" "How are we similar to and different from other animals?" "Where are our origins?" "How did we evolve?" "Are we still evolving?" "How are we different from one another?" and "What does the future hold for the human species?"

The human species

an introduction to biological anthropology
Author: John Relethford
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Social Science
Page: 531
View: 5304

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This general introduction to contemporary physical anthropology presents balanced coverage of the major components of the field: genetics and evolutionary theory, human variation, human evolution, and the biology, behavior, and evolution of primates.

What It Means to Be 98% Chimpanzee

Apes, People, and Their Genes
Author: Jonathan Marks
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520240642
Category: Science
Page: 312
View: 9146

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Focusing on the remarkable similarity between chimp and human DNA, the author explores the role of molecular genetics, anthropology, biology, and psychology in the human-ape relationship.

Introduction to Physical Anthropology


Author: Robert Jurmain,Lynn Kilgore,Wenda Trevathan,Russell L. Ciochon,Eric Bartelink
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1337515914
Category: Social Science
Page: 592
View: 9230

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INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY, presents the most up-to-date, balanced, and comprehensive introduction to the field, combining an engaging writing style and compelling visual content to bring the study of physical anthropology to life for today's students. With a focus on the big picture of human evolution, the 15th Edition helps students master the basic principles of the subject and arrive at an understanding of the human species and its place in the biological world. It continues to keep pace with changes in the field, with new material on genetic technology and other topics reflecting recent scientific findings, including recent fossil discoveries as well as ancient DNA research on Neanderthals, Denisovans, and modern humans. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

50 Great Myths of Human Evolution

Understanding Misconceptions about Our Origins
Author: John H. Relethford
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 0470673923
Category: Science
Page: 304
View: 3926

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50 Great Myths of Human Evolution uses common misconceptions to explore basic theory and research in human evolution and strengthen critical thinking skills for lay readers and students. Examines intriguing—yet widely misunderstood—topics, from general ideas about evolution and human origins to the evolution of modern humans and recent trends in the field Describes what fossils, archaeology, and genetics can tell us about human origins Demonstrates the ways in which science adapts and changes over time to incorporate new evidence and better explanations Includes myths such as “Humans lived at the same time as dinosaurs;” “Lucy was so small because she was a child;” “Our ancestors have always made fire;” and “There is a strong relationship between brain size and intelligence” Comprised of stand-alone essays that are perfect for casual reading, as well as footnotes and references that allow readers to delve more deeply into topics

Human Biodiversity

Genes, Race, and History
Author: Jonathan Marks
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1351514628
Category: Social Science
Page: 321
View: 4662

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Are humans unique? This simple question, at the very heart of the hybrid field of biological anthropology, poses one of the false of dichotomies—with a stereotypical humanist answering in the affirmative and a stereotypical scientist answering in the negative. The study of human biology is different from the study of the biology of other species. In the simplest terms, people's lives and welfare may depend upon it, in a sense that they may not depend on the study of other scientific subjects. Where science is used to validate ideas—four out of five scientists preferring a brand of cigarettes or toothpaste—there is a tendency to accept the judgment as authoritative without asking the kinds of questions we might ask of other citizens' pronouncements. In Human Biodiversity, Marks has attempted to distill from a centuries-long debate what has been learned and remains to be learned about the biological differences within and among human groups. His is the first such attempt by an anthropologist in years, for genetics has undermined the fundamental assumptions of racial taxonomy. The history of those assumptions from Linnaeus to the recent past—the history of other, more useful assumptions that derive from Buffon and have reemerged to account for genetic variation—are the poles of Marks's exploration.

An Introduction to Molecular Anthropology


Author: Mark Stoneking
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1119050871
Category: Science
Page: 400
View: 4563

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Molecular anthropology uses molecular genetic methods to address questions and issues of anthropological interest. More specifically, molecular anthropology is concerned with genetic evidence concerning human origins, migrations, and population relationships, including related topics such as the role of recent natural selection in human population differentiation, or the impact of particular social systems on patterns of human genetic variation. Organized into three major sections, An Introduction to Molecular Anthropology first covers the basics of genetics – what genes are, what they do, and how they do it – as well as how genes behave in populations and how evolution influences them. The following section provides an overview of the different kinds of genetic variation in humans, and how this variation is analyzed and used to make evolutionary inferences. The third section concludes with a presentation of the current state of genetic evidence for human origins, the spread of humans around the world, the role of selection and adaptation in human evolution, and the impact of culture on human genetic variation. A final, concluding chapter discusses various aspects of molecular anthropology in the genomics era, including personal ancestry testing and personal genomics. An Introduction to Molecular Anthropology is an invaluable resource for students studying human evolution, biological anthropology, or molecular anthropology, as well as a reference for anthropologists and anyone else interested in the genetic history of humans.

Introduction to Physical Anthropology, 2013-2014 Edition


Author: Robert Jurmain,Lynn Kilgore,Wenda Trevathan,Russell L. Ciochon
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 1285061977
Category: Social Science
Page: 576
View: 5630

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INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY 2013-2014 Edition continues to present the most up-to-date, balanced, and comprehensive introduction to the field, combining an engaging writing style and compelling visual content to bring the study of physical anthropology to life for today's students. With a focus on the big picture of human evolution, the book helps readers master the basic principles of the subject and arrive at an understanding of the human species and its place in the biological world. This book continues to keep pace with changes in the field, with new material on genetic technology and other topics reflecting recent scientific findings. In this edition, the unifying concept of our connection to all life has been integrated as a framework for presenting the material throughout the text. Available with InfoTrac Student Collections http://gocengage.com/infotrac. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Linking to the Past

A Brief Introduction to Archaeology
Author: Kenneth L. Feder
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195331172
Category: History
Page: 474
View: 4596

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Linking to the Past: A Brief Introduction to Archaeology, Second Edition, offers an engaging introduction to the methods archaeologists use to reveal the human past. Employing an accessible and conversational writing style, Feder uses his students' field study of a three-thousand-year-old North American village site as the backdrop to illustrate how archaeologists find, recover, study, and interpret the material culture left behind by earlier peoples.

Human Adaptability, Student Economy Edition

An Introduction to Ecological Anthropology
Author: Emilio Moran
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0429973330
Category: Social Science
Page: 496
View: 8421

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Designed to help students understand the multiple levels at which human populations respond to their surroundings, this essential text offers the most complete discussion of environmental, physiologic.

Lab Manual and Workbook for Physical Anthropology


Author: Diane France
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 9781305259041
Category: Social Science
Page: 424
View: 5663

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Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

How Forests Think

Toward an Anthropology Beyond the Human
Author: Eduardo Kohn
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520276108
Category: Science
Page: 267
View: 2252

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Can forests think? Do dogs dream? In this astonishing book, Eduardo Kohn challenges the very foundations of anthropology, calling into question our central assumptions about what it means to be human—and thus distinct from all other life forms. Based on four years of fieldwork among the Runa of Ecuador’s Upper Amazon, Eduardo Kohn draws on his rich ethnography to explore how Amazonians interact with the many creatures that inhabit one of the world’s most complex ecosystems. Whether or not we recognize it, our anthropological tools hinge on those capacities that make us distinctly human. However, when we turn our ethnographic attention to how we relate to other kinds of beings, these tools (which have the effect of divorcing us from the rest of the world) break down. How Forests Think seizes on this breakdown as an opportunity. Avoiding reductionistic solutions, and without losing sight of how our lives and those of others are caught up in the moral webs we humans spin, this book skillfully fashions new kinds of conceptual tools from the strange and unexpected properties of the living world itself. In this groundbreaking work, Kohn takes anthropology in a new and exciting direction–one that offers a more capacious way to think about the world we share with other kinds of beings.

The Alternative Introduction to Biological Anthropology


Author: Jonathan Marks
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780190490997
Category: Nature
Page: 320
View: 2271

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In The Alternative Introduction to Biological Anthropology, Second Edition, author Jonathan Marks presents an innovative framework for thinking about the major issues in the field with fourteen original essays designed to correlate to the core chapters in standard textbooks. Each chapter draws on and complements--but does not reconsitute (except for the sake of clarity)--the major data and ideas presented in standard texts. Marks explores such topics as how we make sense of data about our origins, where our modern ideas come from, our inability to separate natural facts from cultural facts and values as we try to understand ourselves, and the social and political aspects of science as a culturally situated mental activity.

Our Origins

Discovering Physical Anthropology, Third Edition
Author: Clark Spencer Larsen
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393921433
Category: Social Science
Page: 576
View: 3018

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The Third Edition of this best-selling text now includes an update to the evolutionary primate taxonomy and even more tools to help students grasp the major concepts in physical anthropology—including new, photorealistic art.

Human Biological Variation


Author: James H. Mielke,Lyle W. Konigsberg,John Relethford
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195387407
Category: Science
Page: 443
View: 4286

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This text explores human biological variation in its broadest sense - from the molecular to the physiological and morphological - focusing on the micro-evolutionary analysis of genetic variation among recent human populations. Authoritative yet accessible, Human Biological Variation, Second Edition, opens with an engaging introduction to basic genetics and the evolutionary forces that set the stage for understanding human diversity. It goes on to offer a clear and detailed discussion of molecular genetics, including its uses and its relationship to anthropological and evolutionary models. The text features up-to-date discussions of classic genetic markers (blood groups, enzymes, and proteins) along with extensive background on DNA analysis and coverage of satellite DNA, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), and Alu inserts. Coverage includes current issues such as the meaning and significance of "race," quantitative genetics and the "nature versus nurture" debates, biocultural interactions, population structure, and cultural and historical influences on patterns of human variation. Integrating real-world examples on interesting topics - including dyslexia, IQ, and homosexuality - this second edition of Human Biological Variation provides the most thorough and contemporary view of our biological diversity.

How Humans Evolved

Seventh Edition
Author: Robert Boyd,Joan B. Silk
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393936775
Category: Social Science
Page: 440
View: 9825

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How Humans Evolved teaches the processes that shape human evolution with a unique blend of evolutionary theory, population genetics, and behavioral ecology. The new edition continues to offer the most up-to-date research—in particular, significantly revised coverage of how recent discoveries are shaping our history of human evolution—while now giving you the best tools to engage your students in and out of the classroom.

The Evolution of Our Tribe

Hominini
Author: Barbara Welker
Publisher: Open SUNY Textbooks
ISBN: 9781942341413
Category:
Page: N.A
View: 1172

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Where did we come from? What were our ancestors like? Why do we differ from other animals? How do scientists trace and construct our evolutionary history? The Evolution of Our Tribe: Hominini provides answers to these questions and more. The book explores the field of paleoanthropology past and present. Beginning over 65 million years ago, Welker traces the evolution of our species, the environments and selective forces that shaped our ancestors, their physical and cultural adaptations, and the people and places involved with their discovery and study. It is designed as a textbook for a course on Human Evolution but can also serve as an introductory text for relevant sections of courses in Biological or General Anthropology or general interest. It is both a comprehensive technical reference for relevant terms, theories, methods, and species and an overview of the people, places, and discoveries that have imbued paleoanthropology with such fascination, romance, and mystery.

Essentials of Physical Anthropology


Author: Robert Jurmain,Lynn Kilgore,Wenda Trevathan
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 111183816X
Category: Social Science
Page: 448
View: 6365

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Concise, well-balanced, and comprehensive, ESSENTIALS OF PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY, Ninth Edition introduces you to physical anthropology with the goal of helping you understand why it is important to know about human evolution. With a new framework that emphasizes ’connections’, the reader is shown how humans are biologically connected to all other life, including our distant ancestors and our contemporary primate cousins, as well as how closely modern human populations are related to each other. Supported by new chapter-opening visual diagrams, a completely new art and map program, outstanding visual photographs and Photo Essays, as well as pedagogy such as What’s Important boxes that put key chapter concepts into perspective for students, this text continues to help students master basic biological principles of physical anthropology and so be able to better understand human origins and our place in the biological world. Altogether, ESSENTIALS OF PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY, Ninth Edition integrates coverage of the latest fossil finds with relevant technologies to be the most up-to-date text available. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

Genetics and the Search for Modern Human Origins


Author: John H. Relethford
Publisher: Wiley-Liss
ISBN: 9780471384137
Category: Science
Page: 264
View: 8952

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A major debate in anthropology concerns the relationship between anatomically modern humans and earlier "archaic" humans including the Neandertals. What was the origin of modern humans? Did we arise as a new species in Africa 200,000 years ago and then replace archaic human populations outside of Africa, or are our origins part of a single evolving lineage extending back over the past two million years? In addition to fossil and archaeological evidence, anthropologists have increasingly turned to using genetic data on living populations to address this question. Patterns of genetic variation within and between living human populations are felt to contain clues as to our species' evolutionary history, and provide a reflection of the past. This book reviews the modern human origins debate focusing on the genetic evidence relating to our origins, including genetic variation in living humans and recent discoveries of ancient DNA from fossil specimens. Following a brief introduction to the problem and a review of evolutionary genetics, the book focuses on gene trees and the search for a common ancestor, genetic diversity within populations, genetic distances between populations, the use of genetic data to reconstruct ancient demography, and Neandertal DNA. The main point of the text is that although the genetic data are often compatible with a replacement model, they are also compatible with some multiregional models. The concluding chapter makes the case that modern human origins are mostly, but not exclusively, out of Africa.