The Holy Roman Empire, 1495-1806: A European Perspective


Author: N.A
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004228721
Category: History
Page: 432
View: 8803

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The Holy Roman Empire was one of the oldest and largest states in early modern Europe. This book breaks new ground in its collective exploration of the Empire’s political and diplomatic, social and cultural relations and of transnational interactions.

The Holy Roman Empire 1495-1806


Author: Peter H. Wilson
Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education
ISBN: 0230344593
Category: History
Page: 160
View: 4280

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The Holy Roman Empire covered much of Europe and lasted for over a millennium, but has long been regarded as ineffective and largely irrelevant to broader historical issues. Drawing on a wealth of research, Peter Wilson offers an alternative interpretation of the Empire's last three centuries. The Holy Roman Empire 1495-1806, second edition: • explains key stages in the Empire's development within the context of wider European history • provides a comprehensive guide to its institutions and the central debates • incorporates the latest scholarship and has been fully revised and updated throughout, offering more in depth treatment of major issues • features a new chapter on whether the Empire can be considered the first German nation state. Clear and concise, this established book is an ideal introduction for anyone who is studying the structure and significance of the Holy Roman Empire and its impact on early modern Europe.

The Holy Roman Empire 1495-1806


Author: Peter H. Wilson
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
ISBN: 9780230239784
Category: History
Page: 160
View: 1899

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The Holy Roman Empire covered much of Europe and lasted for over a millennium, but has long been regarded as ineffective and largely irrelevant to broader historical issues. Drawing on a wealth of research, Peter Wilson offers an alternative interpretation of the Empire's last three centuries. The Holy Roman Empire 1495-1806, second edition: * Explains key stages in the Empire's development within the context of wider European history * Provides a comprehensive guide to its institutions and the central debates * Incorporates the latest scholarship and has been fully revised and updated throughout, offering more in depth treatment of major issues * Features a new chapter on whether the Empire can be considered the first German nation state. Clear and concise, this established book is an ideal introduction for anyone who is studying the structure and significance of the Holy Roman Empire and its impact on early modern Europe.

Heart of Europe

A History of the Holy Roman Empire
Author: Peter H. Wilson
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674058097
Category: History
Page: 941
View: 8701

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The Holy Roman Empire lasted a thousand years, far longer than ancient Rome. Its continuity rested on the ideal of a unified Christian civilization. As Peter Wilson shows, the Empire tells the story of Europe better than histories of individual nation-states, and its legacy can be seen today in debates over the nature of the European Union.

The Emperor's Old Clothes

Constitutional History and the Symbolic Language of the Holy Roman Empire
Author: Barbara Stollberg-Rilinger
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 1782388052
Category: History
Page: 356
View: 4896

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For many years, scholars struggled to write the history of the constitution and political structure of the Holy Roman Empire. This book argues that this was because the political and social order could not be understood without considering the rituals and symbols that held the Empire together. What determined the rules (and whether they were followed) depended on complex symbolic-ritual actions. By examining key moments in the political history of the Empire, the author shows that it was a vocabulary of symbols, not the actual written laws, that formed a political language indispensable in maintaining the common order.

The Holy Roman Empire and the Ottomans

From Global Imperial Power to Absolutist States
Author: Mehmet Sinan Birdal
Publisher: I.B.Tauris
ISBN: 1848856229
Category: History
Page: 211
View: 8588

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The Holy Roman Empire covered much of Europe and lasted for over a millennium, but has long been regarded as ineffective and largely irrelevant to broader historical issues. Drawing on a wealth of research, Peter Wilson offers an alternative interpretation of the Empire's last three centuries. The Holy Roman Empire 1495-1806, second edition: * Explains key stages in the Empire's development within the context of wider European history * Provides a comprehensive guide to its institutions and the central debates * Incorporates the latest scholarship and has been fully revised and updated throughout, offering more in depth treatment of major issues * Features a new chapter on whether the Empire can be considered the first German nation state. Clear and concise, this established book is an ideal introduction for anyone who is studying the structure and significance of the Holy Roman Empire and its impact on early modern Europe.

Germany and the Holy Roman Empire

Volume II: The Peace of Westphalia to the Dissolution of the Reich, 1648-1806
Author: Joachim Whaley
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199693072
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 747
View: 7815

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In the first single-author account of German history from the Reformation to the early nineteenth century since Hajo Holborn's study written in the 1950s, Dr Whaley provides a full account of the history of the Holy Roman Empire. Volume II extends from the Peace of Westphalia to the Dissolution of the Reich.

Austria, Hungary, and the Habsburgs

Central Europe C.1683-1867
Author: R. J. W. Evans
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199281442
Category: History
Page: 337
View: 6743

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These essays, by the leading historian of the Austro-Hungarian empire, explore the political and religious history of the Habsburg lands. They also describe key aspects of the evolution towards modern statehood and national awareness in Central Europe over more than two centuries of cultural and social transition.

The Holy Roman Empire, Reconsidered


Author: Jason Philip Coy,Benjamin Marschke,David Warren Sabean
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 1782380906
Category: History
Page: 346
View: 8593

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The Holy Roman Empire has often been anachronistically assumed to have been defunct long before it was actually dissolved at the beginning of the nineteenth century. The authors of this volume reconsider the significance of the Empire in the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries. Their research reveals the continual importance of the Empire as a stage (and audience) for symbolic performance and communication; as a well utilized problem-solving and conflict-resolving supra-governmental institution; and as an imagined political, religious, and cultural "world" for contemporaries. This volume by leading scholars offers a dramatic reappraisal of politics, religion, and culture and also represents a major revision of the history of the Holy Roman Empire in the early modern period.

Germany and the Holy Roman Empire

Volume I: Maximilian I to the Peace of Westphalia, 1493-1648
Author: Joachim Whaley
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199688826
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 752
View: 1462

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In the first single-author account of German history from the Reformation to the early nineteenth century since Hajo Holborn's study written in the 1950s, Dr Whaley provides a full account of the history of the Holy Roman Empire. Volume I extends from Maximilian I to the Peace of Westphalia.

The Holy Roman Empire


Author: Friedrich Heer
Publisher: Phoenix
ISBN: 9781857993677
Category: Austria
Page: 308
View: 7900

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The history of the Holy Roman Empire was always intertwined with that of Europe as a whole. The stamp of the institutions and politics of the old Empire is still evident in 20th-century Europe, and many of the divisions and struggles in modern Europe, as well as the political ideals, have their roots in the Holy Roman Empire. With this in mind, the book aims to demonstrate the basic unity of European history. The book shows this unity of history as an essentially European institution, starting with the coronation of Charlemagne in Rome on Christmas Day AD 800, and ending with the illegal suspension of the Empire by Francis II in 1806 under pressure from Napoleon.

Europe's Tragedy

A New History of the Thirty Years War
Author: Peter H. Wilson
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141937807
Category: History
Page: 1024
View: 6915

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The horrific series of conflicts known as the Thirty Years War (1618-48) tore the heart out of Europe, killing perhaps a quarter of all Germans and laying waste to whole areas of Central Europe to such a degree that many towns and regions never recovered. All the major European powers apart from Russia were heavily involved and, while each country started out with rational war aims, the fighting rapidly spiralled out of control, with great battles giving way to marauding bands of starving soldiers spreading plague and murder. The war was both a religious and a political one and it was this tangle of motives that made it impossible to stop. Whether motivated by idealism or cynicism, everyone drawn into the conflict was destroyed by it. At its end a recognizably modern Europe had been created but at a terrible price. Peter Wilson's book is a major work, the first new history of the war in a generation, and a fascinating, brilliantly written attempt to explain a compelling series of events. Wilson's great strength is in allowing the reader to understand the tragedy of mixed motives that allowed rulers to gamble their countries' future with such horrifying results. The principal actors in the drama (Wallenstein, Ferdinand II, Gustavus Adolphus, Richelieu) are all here, but so is the experience of the ordinary soldiers and civilians, desperately trying to stay alive under impossible circumstances. The extraordinary narrative of the war haunted Europe's leaders into the twentieth century (comparisons with 1939-45 were entirely appropriate) and modern Europe cannot be understood without reference to this dreadful conflict.

The Hanoverian Succession

Dynastic Politics and Monarchical Culture
Author: Prof Dr Andreas Gestrich,Dr Michael Schaich
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 1472437659
Category: History
Page: 278
View: 642

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Three hundred years after the succession of the first Hanoverian king, this volume provides an intriguing perspective of a dynasty, challenging assumptions of the Hanoverians as petty-minded monarchs presiding over an inconsequential court. Looking afresh at the Georgian monarchs and their role, influence and legacy within Britain, Hanover and beyond, the chapters shine new light on important topics: from rivalling concepts of monarchical legitimacy and court culture to the multi-confessional set-up of the British composite monarchy and the role of the military, the Anglican Church and the aristocracy in defining and challenging the political order.

The Familial State

Ruling Families and Merchant Capitalism in Early Modern Europe
Author: Julia Adams
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801474040
Category: History
Page: 235
View: 6360

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The seventeenth century was called the Dutch Golden Age. Over the course of eighty years, the tiny United Provinces of the Netherlands overthrew Spanish rule and became Europe's dominant power. Eventually, though, Dutch hegemony collapsed as quickly as it had risen. In The Familial State, Julia Adams explores the role that Holland's great families played in this dramatic history. She charts how family patriarchs—who were at the time both state-builders and merchant capitalists—shaped the first great wave of European colonialism, which in turn influenced European political development in innovative ways.On the basis of massive archival work, Adams arrives at a profoundly gendered reading of the family/power structure of the Dutch elite and their companies, in particular the VOC or Dutch East India Company. In the United Provinces, she finds the first example of the power structure that would dominate the transitional states of early modern Europe—the "familial state." This organizational structure is typified, in her view, by "paternal political rule and multiple arrangements among the family heads."

The Holy Roman Empire

A Thousand Years of Europe's History
Author: Peter H. Wilson
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 9780141047478
Category:
Page: 1008
View: 9218

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'Hugely impressive... Wilson is an assured guide through the millennium-long labyrinth of papal-imperial relations' Literary Review A great, sprawling, ancient and unique entity, the Holy Roman Empire, from its founding by Charlemagne to its destruction by Napoleon a millennium later, formed the heart of Europe. It was a great engine for inventions and ideas, it was the origin of many modern European states, from Germany to the Czech Republic, its relations with Italy, France and Poland dictated the course of countless wars - indeed European history as a whole makes no sense without it. In this strikingly ambitious book, Peter H. Wilson explains how the Empire worked. It is not a chronological history, but an attempt to convey to readers why it was so important and how it changed over its existence. The result is a tour de force - a book that raises countless questions about the nature of political and military power, about diplomacy and the nature of European civilization and about the legacy of the Empire, which has continued to haunt its offspring, from Imperial and Nazi Germany to the European Union.

The Politics of Survival

Artisans in Twentieth-Century France
Author: Steven M. Zdatny
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780195363104
Category: History
Page: 272
View: 2441

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The problem of the general political inclinations of the petite bourgeoisie, and especially its relationship to fascism, is one of the major questions currently facing historians dealing with European society in the past one hundred years. Independent artisans have at best been seen as an anachronism in the industrial age. Often, they are regarded as the social basis of the fascist movements of the 1920s and 30s because of their supposedly reactionary class interests. Unfortunately, such sweeping analyses--by both Marxists and non-Marxists alike--have been based largely on one case, that of Germany. It is France however, that has been considered the pre-eminent nation of the petit bourgeois, and fascism had only limited appeal there. This is the central question Zdatny addresses in this book as he examines the social and political history of the archetypical petite bourgeois, the self-employed craftsmen of France.