Mira Lloyd Dock and the Progressive Era Conservation Movement


Author: Susan Rimby
Publisher: Penn State Press
ISBN: 9780271061528
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 224
View: 5492

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For her time, Mira Lloyd Dock was an exceptional woman: a university-trained botanist, lecturer, women’s club leader, activist in the City Beautiful movement, and public official—the first woman to be appointed to Pennsylvania’s state government. In her twelve years on the Pennsylvania Forest Commission, she allied with the likes of J. T. Rothrock, Gifford Pinchot, and Dietrich Brandis to help bring about a new era in American forestry. She was also an integral force in founding and fostering the Pennsylvania State Forest Academy in Mont Alto, which produced generations of Pennsylvania foresters before becoming Penn State's Mont Alto campus. Though much has been written about her male counterparts, Mira Lloyd Dock and the Progressive Era Conservation Movement is the first book dedicated to Mira Lloyd Dock and her work. Susan Rimby weaves these layers of Dock’s story together with the greater historical context of the era to create a vivid and accessible picture of Progressive Era conservation in the eastern United States and Dock’s important role and legacy in that movement.

Women in Landscape Architecture

Essays on History and Practice
Author: Louise A. Mozingo,Linda Jewell
Publisher: McFarland
ISBN: 078648733X
Category: Social Science
Page: 240
View: 579

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While many fields struggle to specify feminine contributions, the work of women has always played a fundamental role in American landscape architecture. Women claim responsibility for many landscape types now taken for granted, including community gardens, playgrounds, and streetscapes. This collection of essays by leaders in the discipline addresses the ways that gender has influenced the history, design practice and perception of landscapes. It highlights women’s relation to landscape architecture, presents the professional efforts of women in the landscape realm, examines both the perception and experience of landscapes by women, and speculates on ways to re-imagine gender and the landscape.

Women in American Politics: History and Milestones


Author: Doris Weatherford
Publisher: SAGE
ISBN: 1608710076
Category: Political Science
Page: 524
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Women in American Politics is a new reference detailing the milestones and trends in women's political participation in the United States. This two-volume work provides much needed perspective and background on the events and situations that have surrounded women's political activities. It offers insightful analysis on women's political achievements in the United States, including such topics as the campaign to secure nation-wide suffrage; pioneer women state officeholders; women first elected to U.S. Congress, governorships, mayoralties, and other offices; and women first appointed as Cabinet officials, judges, and ambassadors. It also includes profiles of the women who have run for vice president and president. Women in American Politics is organized in a framework both logical and useful to readers and researchers. Original material offers students, scholars, teachers, and other professionals a guide to understanding the complex struggle in women's progress toward achieving political parity with men in the United States. Each chapter is structured in three parts: - part one features graphic information-tables, lists, charts, or maps-detailing the historical record with data not compiled anywhere else, on women officeholders. - part two offers insightful narrative analysis describing how women achieved what they did, examines the complex and sometimes contradictory trends behind the facts of women's political milestones, and explores how social and economic contexts affected the progress of their accomplishments. - part three presents biographical entries describing in more personal terms women's struggle for political equality. Sidebars in each chapter illuminate the drama of political life and consider the evolving female electorate, exploring how women voters have impacted particular issues, specific elections, or other key turning points, and the tradition of appointing widows to open seats. The final chapter uniquely looks at women's political history and differences in achievement from a state and regional perspective. Entries on each state (as well as on District of Columbia and Puerto Rico) highlight milestones and provide insight into the unique aspects of each state.

Domesticating History

The Political Origins of America's House Museums
Author: Patricia West
Publisher: Smithsonian Institution
ISBN: 1588344258
Category: Art
Page: 256
View: 4490

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Celebrating the lives of famous men and women, historic house museums showcase restored rooms and period furnishings, and portray in detail their former occupants' daily lives. But behind the gilded molding and curtain brocade lie the largely unknown, politically charged stories of how the homes were first established as museums. Focusing on George Washington’s Mount Vernon, Louisa May Alcott’s Orchard House, Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello, and the Booker T. Washington National Monument, Patricia West shows how historic houses reflect less the lives and times of their famous inhabitants than the political pressures of the eras during which they were transformed into museums.

Fannie Barrier Williams

Crossing the Borders of Region and Race
Author: Wanda A. Hendricks
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252095871
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 288
View: 9577

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Born shortly before the Civil War, activist and reformer Fannie Barrier Williams (1855-1944) became one of the most prominent educated African American women of her generation. Hendricks shows how Williams became "raced" for the first time in early adulthood, when she became a teacher in Missouri and Washington, D.C., and faced the injustices of racism and the stark contrast between the lives of freed slaves and her own privileged upbringing in a western New York village. She carried this new awareness to Chicago, where she joined forces with black and predominantly white women's clubs, the Unitarian church, and various other interracial social justice organizations to become a prominent spokesperson for Progressive economic, racial, and gender reforms during the transformative period of industrialization. By highlighting how Williams experienced a set of freedoms in the North that were not imaginable in the South, this clearly-written, widely accessible biography expands how we understand intellectual possibilities, economic success, and social mobility in post-Reconstruction America.

The Clubwomen's Daughters

Collectivist Impulses in Progressive-era Girl's Fiction, 1890-1940
Author: Gwen Tarbox
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 131777602X
Category: History
Page: 256
View: 3364

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First published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

In Her Place

A Guide to St. Louis Women's History
Author: Katharine T. Corbett
Publisher: Missouri History Museum
ISBN: 9781883982300
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 304
View: 3218

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This new addition to the popular guidebook series explores women's experiences and the impact of their activities on the history and landscape of St. Louis. When the city was founded, most St. Louisans believed that "a woman's place is in the home," in the house of her father, husband, or master. Over the years, women pushed out the boundaries of their lives into the public arena, and in doing so they changed the face of St. Louis. In Her Place is a guide to the changing definition of a woman's place in St. Louis, beginning with the colonial period and ending with the 1960s. Each chapter explores the experiences of women during a specific time period and identifies the sites of some of their public activities on a map of the city created from historical sources. Along the way, readers will meet such significant St. Louis women as Harriet Scott, Susan Blow, Edna Gellhorn, and Philippine Duchesne and learn about the activities of the Ladies' Union Aid Society, the Sisters of Charity, the League of Women Voters, and the Harper Married Ladies' Club. The book also includes four tours of the St. Louis region addressing the themes of the book and identifying significant buildings, homes, and other key sites. Current photographs will help readers locate the sites on detailed maps. An up-to-date bibliography and resource listing make this an invaluable guide for anyone interested in studying the history of women in the region.

The Afro-American Woman

Struggles and Images
Author: Sharon Harley,Rosalyn Terborg-Penn
Publisher: Black Classic Press
ISBN: 9781574780260
Category: Social Science
Page: 137
View: 976

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Originally published in 1978, a collection of essays includes historical and black nationalist perspectives on black women during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, highlighting their common experience of racism and sexism. Reprint. Tour. IP.

A Shining Thread of Hope


Author: Darlene Clark Hine,Kathleen Thompson
Publisher: Broadway Books
ISBN: 0307568229
Category: History
Page: 368
View: 2214

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At the greatest moments and in the cruelest times, black women have been a crucial part of America's history. Now, the inspiring history of black women in America is explored in vivid detail by two leaders in the fields of African American and women's history. A Shining Thread of Hope chronicles the lives of black women from indentured servitude in the early American colonies to the cruelty of antebellum plantations, from the reign of lynch law in the Jim Crow South to the triumphs of the Civil Rights era, and it illustrates how the story of black women in America is as much a tale of courage and hope as it is a history of struggle. On both an individual and a collective level, A Shining Thread of Hope reveals the strength and spirit of black women and brings their stories from the fringes of American history to a central position in our understanding of the forces and events that have shaped this country. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Gendered Domains

Rethinking Public and Private in Women's History : Essays from the Seventh Berkshire Conference on the History of Women
Author: Dorothy O. Helly,Susan Reverby
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801497025
Category: History
Page: 349
View: 1815

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The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture

Volume 20: Social Class
Author: Larry J. Griffin,Peggy G. Hargis,Charles Reagan Wilson
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 0807882542
Category: Reference
Page: 528
View: 410

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This volume of The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture offers a timely, authoritative, and interdisciplinary exploration of issues related to social class in the South from the colonial era to the present. With introductory essays by J. Wayne Flynt and by editors Larry J. Griffin and Peggy G. Hargis, the volume is a comprehensive, stand-alone reference to this complex subject, which underpins the history of the region and shapes its future. In 58 thematic essays and 103 topical entries, the contributors explore the effects of class on all aspects of life in the South--its role in Indian removal, the Civil War, the New Deal, and the civil rights movement, for example, and how it has been manifested in religion, sports, country and gospel music, and matters of gender. Artisans and the working class, indentured workers and steelworkers, the Freedmen's Bureau and the Knights of Labor are all examined. This volume provides a full investigation of social class in the region and situates class concerns at the center of our understanding of Southern culture.

A History of the African American People

The History, Traditions & Culture of African Americans
Author: James Oliver Horton,Lois E. Horton
Publisher: Wayne State University Press
ISBN: 9780814326978
Category: History
Page: 208
View: 4596

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Examines the social and communal history of African Americans from 1650 through 1995

Women of the Commonwealth

Work, Family, and Social Change in Nineteenth-century Massachusetts
Author: Susan L. Porter
Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press
ISBN: 9781558490055
Category: History
Page: 240
View: 7975

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A collection of ten essays which document sociological topics in women's history, covering 19th-century Massachusetts. The study covers the dynamics of gender, race, ethnicity and class in exploring relationships in the labour market and family.

Intimate Practices

Literacy and Cultural Work in U.S. Women's Clubs, 1880-1920
Author: Anne Ruggles Gere
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252066047
Category: Social Science
Page: 367
View: 1922

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Women's clubs at the turn of the century were numerous, dedicated to a number of issues, and crossed class, religious, and racial lines. Emphasizing the intimacy engendered by shared reading and writing in these groups, Anne Ruggles Gere contends that these literacy practices meant that club members took an active part in reinventing the nation during a period of major change. Gere uses archival material that documents club members' perspectives and activities around such issues as Americanization, womanhood, peace, consumerism, benevolence, taste, and literature and offers a rare depth of insight into the interests and lives of American women from the fin de sïcle through the beginning of the roaring twenties. Intimate Practices is unique in its exploration of a range of women's clubs -- Mormon, Jewish, white middle-class, African American, and working class -- and paints a vast and colorful multicultural, multifaceted canvas of these widely-divergent women's groups. - Publisher.

The Struggle for Equal Adulthood

Gender, Race, Age, and the Fight for Citizenship in Antebellum America
Author: Corinne T. Field
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 146961815X
Category: Social Science
Page: 260
View: 7120

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In the fight for equality, early feminists often cited the infantilization of women and men of color as a method used to keep them out of power. Corinne T. Field argues that attaining adulthood--and the associated political rights, economic opportunities, and sexual power that come with it--became a common goal for both white and African American feminists between the American Revolution and the Civil War. The idea that black men and all women were more like children than adult white men proved difficult to overcome, however, and continued to serve as a foundation for racial and sexual inequality for generations. In detailing the connections between the struggle for equality and concepts of adulthood, Field provides an essential historical context for understanding the dilemmas black and white women still face in America today, from "glass ceilings" and debates over welfare dependency to a culture obsessed with youth and beauty. Drawn from a fascinating past, this book tells the history of how maturity, gender, and race collided, and how those affected came together to fight against injustice.

Portraits of Women in the American West


Author: Dee Garceau-Hagen
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136076182
Category: History
Page: 286
View: 4934

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Men are usually the heroes of Western stories, but women also played a crucial role in developing the American frontier, and their stories have rarely been told. This anthology of biographical essays on women promises new insight into gender in the 19C American West. The women featured include Asian Americans, African-Americans and Native American women, as well as their white counterparts. The original essays offer observations about gender and sexual violence, the subordinate status of women of color, their perseverance and influence in changing that status, a look at the gendered religious legacy that shaped Western Catholicism, and women in the urban and rural, industrial and agricultural West.

Diminished Democracy

From Membership to Management in American Civic Life
Author: Theda Skocpol
Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press
ISBN: 0806150173
Category: Political Science
Page: 388
View: 693

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Pundits and social observers have voiced alarm each year as fewer Americans involve themselves in voluntary groups that meet regularly. Thousands of nonprofit groups have been launched in recent times, but most are run by professionals who lobby Congress or deliver social services to clients. What will happen to U.S. democracy if participatory groups and social movements wither, while civic involvement becomes one more occupation rather than every citizen’s right and duty? In Diminished Democracy, Theda Skocpol shows that this decline in public involvement has not always been the case in this country—and how, by understanding the causes of this change, we might reverse it.

Preacher Woman Sings the Blues

The Autobiographies of Nineteenth-century African American Evangelists
Author: Richard J. Douglass-Chin
Publisher: University of Missouri Press
ISBN: 9780826263018
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 240
View: 5270

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