Hip Hop's Amnesia

From Blues and the Black Women's Club Movement to Rap and the Hip Hop Movement
Author: Reiland Rabaka
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739174924
Category: Music
Page: 354
View: 4937

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What did rap music and hip hop culture inherit from the spirituals, classic blues, ragtime, classic jazz, and bebop? What did rap music and hip hop culture inherit from the Black Women's Club Movement, New Negro Movement, Harlem Renaissance, Hipster Movement, and Black Muslim Movement? In Hip Hop's Amnesia award-winning author, spoken-word artist, and multi-instrumentalist Reiland Rabaka answers these questions by rescuing and reclaiming the often-overlooked early twentieth century origins and evolution of rap music and hip hop culture.

Black Women's Christian Activism

Seeking Social Justice in a Northern Suburb
Author: Betty Livingston Adams
Publisher: NYU Press
ISBN: 1479814814
Category: Religion
Page: 240
View: 2866

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2017 Wilbur Non-Fiction Award Recipient In Black Women’s Christian Activism, Betty Livingston Adams examines the oft overlooked role of non-elite black women in the growth of northern suburbs and American Protestantism in the first half of the twentieth century. When a domestic servant named Violet Johnson moved to the affluent white suburb of Summit, New Jersey in 1897, she became one of just barely a hundred black residents in the town of six thousand. In this avowedly liberal Protestant community, the very definition of “the suburbs” depended on observance of unmarked and fluctuating race and class barriers. But Johnson did not intend to accept the status quo. Establishing a Baptist church a year later, a seemingly moderate act that would have implications far beyond weekly worship, Johnson challenged assumptions of gender and race, advocating for a politics of civic righteousness that would grant African Americans an equal place in a Christian nation. Johnson’s story is powerful, but she was just one among the many working-class activists integral to the budding days of the civil rights movement. Focusing on the strategies and organizational models church women employed in the fight for social justice, Adams tracks the intersections of politics and religion, race and gender, and place and space in a New York City suburb, a local example that offers new insights on northern racial oppression and civil rights protest. As this book makes clear, religion made a key difference in the lives and activism of ordinary black women who lived, worked, and worshiped on the margin during this tumultuous time.

African American Women in the Struggle for the Vote, 1850-1920


Author: Rosalyn Terborg-Penn
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 9780253211767
Category: History
Page: 192
View: 5635

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"Rarely has a short book accomplished so much as Terborg-Penn's seminal work. With the utmost attention to detail Terborg-Penn examines the contributions of black suffragist stalwarts... It undoubtedly will become the definitive work on African American women's involvement in the mainstream woman suffrage movement and specifically on black women's struggle for the vote." --Choice "... this is a well-written overview of a crucial aspect of African American history that would be ideal for the college classroom." --Journal of American History "... not only a major contribution to suffrage history... but also a powerful indictment of white suffrage activists who were able to see beyond the sexism but not the racism of their society." --Journal of Southern History "This groundbreaking volume provides a theoretical and practical framework for new paradigms in African American women's history.... All Black politicians should read and discuss this unique and brilliant book. Many lessons can be learned." --Philadelphia New Observer This comprehensive look at the African American women who fought for the right to vote analyzes the women's own stories and examines why they joined and how they participated in the U.S. women's suffrage movement. Terborg-Penn shows how every political and racial effort to keep African American women disfranchised met with their active resistance until black women finally achieved full citizenship.

Jesus, Jobs, and Justice

African American Women and Religion
Author: Bettye Collier-Thomas
Publisher: Knopf
ISBN: 9780307593054
Category: Social Science
Page: 736
View: 8090

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“The Negroes must have Jesus, Jobs, and Justice,” declared Nannie Helen Burroughs, a nationally known figure among black and white leaders and an architect of the Woman’s Convention of the National Baptist Convention. Burroughs made this statement about the black women’s agenda in 1958, as she anticipated the collapse of Jim Crow segregation and pondered the fate of African Americans. Following more than half a century of organizing and struggling against racism in American society, sexism in the National Baptist Convention, and the racism and paternalism of white women and the Southern Baptist Convention, Burroughs knew that black Americans would need more than religion to survive and to advance socially, economically, and politically. Jesus, jobs, and justice are the threads that weave through two hundred years of black women’s experiences in America. Bettye Collier-Thomas’s groundbreaking book gives us a remarkable account of the religious faith, social and political activism, and extraordinary resilience of black women during the centuries of American growth and change. It shows the beginnings of organized religion in slave communities and how the Bible was a source of inspiration; the enslaved saw in their condition a parallel to the suffering and persecution that Jesus had endured. The author makes clear that while religion has been a guiding force in the lives of most African Americans, for black women it has been essential. As co-creators of churches, women were a central factor in their development. Jesus, Jobs, and Justice explores the ways in which women had to cope with sexism in black churches, as well as racism in mostly white denominations, in their efforts to create missionary societies and form women’s conventions. It also reveals the hidden story of how issues of sex and sexuality have sometimes created tension and divisions within institutions. Black church women created national organizations such as the National Association of Colored Women, the National League of Colored Republican Women, and the National Council of Negro Women. They worked in the interracial movement, in white-led Christian groups such as the YWCA and Church Women United, and in male-dominated organizations such as the NAACP and National Urban League to demand civil rights, equal employment, and educational opportunities, and to protest lynching, segregation, and discrimination. And black women missionaries sacrificed their lives in service to their African sisters whose destiny they believed was tied to theirs. Jesus, Jobs, and Justice restores black women to their rightful place in American and black history and demonstrates their faith in themselves, their race, and their God. From the Hardcover edition.

Uncle Sam Wants You

World War I and the Making of the Modern American Citizen
Author: Christopher Capozzola
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199714865
Category: History
Page: 352
View: 1261

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Based on a rich array of sources that capture the voices of both political leaders and ordinary Americans, Uncle Sam Wants You offers a vivid and provocative new interpretation of American political history, revealing how the tensions of mass mobilization during World War I led to a significant increase in power for the federal government. Christopher Capozzola shows how, when the war began, Americans at first mobilized society by stressing duty, obligation, and responsibility over rights and freedoms. But the heated temper of war quickly unleashed coercion on an unprecedented scale, making wartime America the scene of some of the nation's most serious political violence, including notorious episodes of outright mob violence. To solve this problem, Americans turned over increasing amounts of power to the federal government. In the end, whether they were some of the four million men drafted under the Selective Service Act or the tens of millions of home-front volunteers, Americans of the World War I era created a new American state, and new ways of being American citizens.

Welfare Warriors

The Welfare Rights Movement in the United States
Author: Premilla Nadasen
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136743693
Category: History
Page: 344
View: 2132

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First published in 2005. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

African American Civil Rights

Early Activism and the Niagara Movement
Author: Angela Jones
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 0313393605
Category: History
Page: 281
View: 1176

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• Primary source documents including the Niagara Movement's "Declaration of Principles" • A chronology of the development of the civil rights movement • Photographs of key players in the Niagara Movement • An expansive bibliography encompassing titles from sociology, political science, and history

Lighting the Fires of Freedom

African American Women in the Civil Rights Movement
Author: Janet Dewart Bell
Publisher: The New Press
ISBN: 1620973367
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 9648

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One of Book Riot's “29 Amazing New Books Coming in 2018” A groundbreaking collection based on oral histories that brilliantly plumb the leadership of African American women in the twentieth-century fight for civil rights—many nearly lost to history—from the latest winner of the Studs and Ida Terkel Prize During the Civil Rights Movement, African American women were generally not in the headlines; they simply did the work that needed to be done. Yet despite their significant contributions at all levels of the movement, they remain mostly invisible to the larger public. Beyond Rosa Parks, Coretta Scott King, and Dorothy Height, most Americans, black and white alike, would be hard-pressed to name other leaders at the community, local, and national levels. In Lighting the Fires of Freedom Janet Dewart Bell shines a light on women’s all-too-often overlooked achievements in the Movement. Through wide-ranging conversations with nine women, several now in their nineties with decades of untold stories, we hear what ignited and fueled their activism, as Bell vividly captures their inspiring voices. Lighting the Fires of Freedom offers these deeply personal and intimate accounts of extraordinary struggles for justice that resulted in profound social change, stories that remain important and relevant today. Published to coincide with the fiftieth anniversary of the Civil Rights Act of 1968, Lighting the Fires of Freedom is a vital document for understanding the Civil Rights Movement and an enduring testament to the vitality of women’s leadership during one of the most dramatic periods of American history.

Sojourning for Freedom

Black Women, American Communism, and the Making of Black Left Feminism
Author: Erik S. McDuffie
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822350505
Category: History
Page: 311
View: 4591

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Illuminates a pathbreaking black radical feminist politics forged by black women leftists active in the U.S. Communist Party between its founding in 1919 and its demise in the 1950s.

The Afro-American Woman

Struggles and Images
Author: Sharon Harley,Rosalyn Terborg-Penn
Publisher: Black Classic Press
ISBN: 9781574780260
Category: Social Science
Page: 137
View: 7030

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Originally published in 1978, a collection of essays includes historical and black nationalist perspectives on black women during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, highlighting their common experience of racism and sexism. Reprint. Tour. IP.

Fruits of Victory

The Woman's Land Army of America in the Great War
Author: Elaine F. Weiss
Publisher: Potomac Books, Inc.
ISBN: 1612343996
Category: History
Page: 352
View: 4807

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Imagine a more controversial Rosie the Riveter--a generation older and more outlandish for her time. She was the "farmerette" of the Woman's Land Army of America (WLA), doing a man's job on the home front during World War I. From 1917 to 1920 the WLA sent more than twenty thousand urban women into rural America to take over farm work after the men went off to war and food shortages threatened the nation. These women, from all social and economic strata, lived together in communal camps and did what was considered "men's work": plowing fields, driving tractors, planting, harvesting, and hauling lumber. The Land Army was a civilian enterprise organized and financed by women. It insisted on fair labor practices and pay equal to male laborers' wages for its workers and taught women not only agricultural skills but also leadership and management techniques. Despite their initial skepticism, farmers became the WLA's loudest champions, and the farmerette was celebrated as an icon of American women's patriotism and pluck. The WLA's short but spirited life foreshadowed some of the most significant social issues of the twentieth century: women's changing roles, the problem of class distinctions in a democracy, and the physiological and psychological differences between men and women. The dramatic story of the WLA is vividly retold here using long-buried archival material, allowing a fascinating chapter of America's World War I experience to be rediscovered.

A Shining Thread of Hope


Author: Darlene Clark Hine,Kathleen Thompson
Publisher: Broadway Books
ISBN: 0307568229
Category: History
Page: 368
View: 8803

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At the greatest moments and in the cruelest times, black women have been a crucial part of America's history. Now, the inspiring history of black women in America is explored in vivid detail by two leaders in the fields of African American and women's history. A Shining Thread of Hope chronicles the lives of black women from indentured servitude in the early American colonies to the cruelty of antebellum plantations, from the reign of lynch law in the Jim Crow South to the triumphs of the Civil Rights era, and it illustrates how the story of black women in America is as much a tale of courage and hope as it is a history of struggle. On both an individual and a collective level, A Shining Thread of Hope reveals the strength and spirit of black women and brings their stories from the fringes of American history to a central position in our understanding of the forces and events that have shaped this country. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Beyond Respectability

The Intellectual Thought of Race Women
Author: Brittney C. Cooper
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252099540
Category: Social Science
Page: 208
View: 4747

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Beyond Respectability charts the development of African American women as public intellectuals and the evolution of their thought from the end of the 1800s through the Black Power era of the 1970s. Eschewing the Great Race Man paradigm so prominent in contemporary discourse, Brittney C. Cooper looks at the far-reaching intellectual achievements of female thinkers and activists like Anna Julia Cooper, Mary Church Terrell, Fannie Barrier Williams, Pauli Murray, and Toni Cade Bambara. Cooper delves into the processes that transformed these women and others into racial leadership figures, including long-overdue discussions of their theoretical output and personal experiences. As Cooper shows, their body of work critically reshaped our understandings of race and gender discourse. It also confronted entrenched ideas of how--and who--produced racial knowledge.

Women, Race, & Class


Author: Angela Y. Davis
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307798496
Category: Social Science
Page: 288
View: 5369

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A powerful study of the women's liberation movement in the U.S., from abolitionist days to the present, that demonstrates how it has always been hampered by the racist and classist biases of its leaders. From the widely revered and legendary political activist and scholar Angela Davis.

Hip Hop's Inheritance

From the Harlem Renaissance to the Hip Hop Feminist Movement
Author: Reiland Rabaka
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739164821
Category: Music
Page: 302
View: 5469

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Hip Hop's Inheritance arguably offers the first book-length treatment of what hip hop culture has, literally, 'inherited' from the Harlem Renaissance, the Black Arts movement, the Feminist Art movement, and 1980s and 1990s postmodern aesthetics. By comparing and contrasting the major motifs of the aforementioned cultural aesthetic traditions with those of hip hop culture, all the while critically exploring the origins and evolution of black popular culture from antebellum America through to 'Obama's America,' Hip Hop's Inheritance demonstrates that the Hip Hop generation is not the first generation of young black folk preoccupied with spirituality and sexuality, race and religion, entertainment and athletics, or ghetto culture and bourgeois culture.

The Struggle for Equal Adulthood

Gender, Race, Age, and the Fight for Citizenship in Antebellum America
Author: Corinne T. Field
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 146961815X
Category: Social Science
Page: 260
View: 2380

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In the fight for equality, early feminists often cited the infantilization of women and men of color as a method used to keep them out of power. Corinne T. Field argues that attaining adulthood--and the associated political rights, economic opportunities, and sexual power that come with it--became a common goal for both white and African American feminists between the American Revolution and the Civil War. The idea that black men and all women were more like children than adult white men proved difficult to overcome, however, and continued to serve as a foundation for racial and sexual inequality for generations. In detailing the connections between the struggle for equality and concepts of adulthood, Field provides an essential historical context for understanding the dilemmas black and white women still face in America today, from "glass ceilings" and debates over welfare dependency to a culture obsessed with youth and beauty. Drawn from a fascinating past, this book tells the history of how maturity, gender, and race collided, and how those affected came together to fight against injustice.

The Clubwomen's Daughters

Collectivist Impulses in Progressive-era Girl's Fiction, 1890-1940
Author: Gwen Tarbox
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 131777602X
Category: History
Page: 256
View: 5598

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First published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Toward an Intellectual History of Black Women


Author: Mia E. Bay,Farah J. Griffin,Martha S. Jones,Barbara D. Savage
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469620928
Category: Social Science
Page: 320
View: 2547

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Despite recent advances in the study of black thought, black women intellectuals remain often neglected. This collection of essays by fifteen scholars of history and literature establishes black women's places in intellectual history by engaging the work of writers, educators, activists, religious leaders, and social reformers in the United States, Africa, and the Caribbean. Dedicated to recovering the contributions of thinkers marginalized by both their race and their gender, these essays uncover the work of unconventional intellectuals, both formally educated and self-taught, and explore the broad community of ideas in which their work participated. The end result is a field-defining and innovative volume that addresses topics ranging from religion and slavery to the politicized and gendered reappraisal of the black female body in contemporary culture. Contributors are Mia E. Bay, Judith Byfield, Alexandra Cornelius, Thadious Davis, Corinne T. Field, Arlette Frund, Kaiama L. Glover, Farah J. Griffin, Martha S. Jones, Natasha Lightfoot, Sherie Randolph, Barbara D. Savage, Jon Sensbach, Maboula Soumahoro, and Cheryl Wall.