African American Civil Rights

Early Activism and the Niagara Movement
Author: Angela Jones
Publisher: ABC-CLIO
ISBN: 0313393605
Category: History
Page: 281
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• Primary source documents including the Niagara Movement's "Declaration of Principles" • A chronology of the development of the civil rights movement • Photographs of key players in the Niagara Movement • An expansive bibliography encompassing titles from sociology, political science, and history

The Afro-American Woman

Struggles and Images
Author: Sharon Harley,Rosalyn Terborg-Penn
Publisher: Black Classic Press
ISBN: 9781574780260
Category: Social Science
Page: 137
View: 2924

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Originally published in 1978, a collection of essays includes historical and black nationalist perspectives on black women during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, highlighting their common experience of racism and sexism. Reprint. Tour. IP.

The Clubwomen's Daughters

Collectivist Impulses in Progressive-era Girl's Fiction, 1890-1940
Author: Gwen Tarbox
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 131777602X
Category: History
Page: 256
View: 2549

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First published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Defining the Struggle

National Racial Justice Organizing, 1880-1915
Author: Susan D. Carle
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199945748
Category: History
Page: 404
View: 8980

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This book punctures the myth that important national civil rights organizing in the United States began with the NAACP, showing that earlier national organizations developed key ideas about law and racial justice activism that the NAACP later pursued.

Fannie Barrier Williams

Crossing the Borders of Region and Race
Author: Wanda A. Hendricks
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252095871
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 288
View: 900

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Born shortly before the Civil War, activist and reformer Fannie Barrier Williams (1855-1944) became one of the most prominent educated African American women of her generation. Hendricks shows how Williams became "raced" for the first time in early adulthood, when she became a teacher in Missouri and Washington, D.C., and faced the injustices of racism and the stark contrast between the lives of freed slaves and her own privileged upbringing in a western New York village. She carried this new awareness to Chicago, where she joined forces with black and predominantly white women's clubs, the Unitarian church, and various other interracial social justice organizations to become a prominent spokesperson for Progressive economic, racial, and gender reforms during the transformative period of industrialization. By highlighting how Williams experienced a set of freedoms in the North that were not imaginable in the South, this clearly-written, widely accessible biography expands how we understand intellectual possibilities, economic success, and social mobility in post-Reconstruction America.

Gender, Race, and Politics in the Midwest

Black Club Women in Illinois
Author: Wanda A. Hendricks
Publisher: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 9780253334473
Category: Social Science
Page: 162
View: 6070

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Examines the structures and ideologies of Illinois black club women, looks at the activities of some rural and urban clubs, and describes individual women's work in the areas of child and health care, establishing settlement houses, and suffrage efforts.

A Shining Thread of Hope


Author: Darlene Clark Hine,Kathleen Thompson
Publisher: Broadway Books
ISBN: 0307568229
Category: History
Page: 368
View: 4093

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At the greatest moments and in the cruelest times, black women have been a crucial part of America's history. Now, the inspiring history of black women in America is explored in vivid detail by two leaders in the fields of African American and women's history. A Shining Thread of Hope chronicles the lives of black women from indentured servitude in the early American colonies to the cruelty of antebellum plantations, from the reign of lynch law in the Jim Crow South to the triumphs of the Civil Rights era, and it illustrates how the story of black women in America is as much a tale of courage and hope as it is a history of struggle. On both an individual and a collective level, A Shining Thread of Hope reveals the strength and spirit of black women and brings their stories from the fringes of American history to a central position in our understanding of the forces and events that have shaped this country. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Toward an Intellectual History of Black Women


Author: Mia E. Bay,Farah J. Griffin,Martha S. Jones,Barbara D. Savage
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469620928
Category: Social Science
Page: 320
View: 2561

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Despite recent advances in the study of black thought, black women intellectuals remain often neglected. This collection of essays by fifteen scholars of history and literature establishes black women's places in intellectual history by engaging the work of writers, educators, activists, religious leaders, and social reformers in the United States, Africa, and the Caribbean. Dedicated to recovering the contributions of thinkers marginalized by both their race and their gender, these essays uncover the work of unconventional intellectuals, both formally educated and self-taught, and explore the broad community of ideas in which their work participated. The end result is a field-defining and innovative volume that addresses topics ranging from religion and slavery to the politicized and gendered reappraisal of the black female body in contemporary culture. Contributors are Mia E. Bay, Judith Byfield, Alexandra Cornelius, Thadious Davis, Corinne T. Field, Arlette Frund, Kaiama L. Glover, Farah J. Griffin, Martha S. Jones, Natasha Lightfoot, Sherie Randolph, Barbara D. Savage, Jon Sensbach, Maboula Soumahoro, and Cheryl Wall.

Gendered Domains

Rethinking Public and Private in Women's History : Essays from the Seventh Berkshire Conference on the History of Women
Author: Dorothy O. Helly,Susan Reverby
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 9780801497025
Category: History
Page: 349
View: 3079

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Women of the Commonwealth

Work, Family, and Social Change in Nineteenth-century Massachusetts
Author: Susan L. Porter
Publisher: Univ of Massachusetts Press
ISBN: 9781558490055
Category: History
Page: 240
View: 5255

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A collection of ten essays which document sociological topics in women's history, covering 19th-century Massachusetts. The study covers the dynamics of gender, race, ethnicity and class in exploring relationships in the labour market and family.

To Make Our World Anew

A History of African Americans
Author: Robin D. G. Kelley,Earl Lewis
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199839018
Category: Social Science
Page: 400
View: 5293

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Written by the most prominent of the new generation of historians, this superb volume offers the most up-to-date and authoritative account available of African-American history, ranging from the first Africans brought as slaves into the Americas, to today's black filmmakers and politicians. Here is a panoramic view of African American life, rich in gripping first-person accounts and short character sketches that invite readers to relive history as African Americans experienced it. We begin in Africa, with the growth of the slave trade, and follow the forced migration of what is estimated to be between ten and twenty million people, witnessing the terrible human cost of slavery in the colonies of England and Spain. We read of the Haitian Revolution, which ended victoriously in 1804 with the birth of the first independent black nation in the New World, and of slave rebellions and resistance in the United States in the years leading up to the Civil War. There are vivid accounts of the Civil War and Reconstruction years, the backlash of notorious "Jim Crow" laws and mob lynchings, and the founding of key black educational institutions. The contributors also trace the migration of blacks to the major cities, the birth of the Harlem Renaissance, the hardships of the Great Depression and the service of African Americans in World War II, the struggle for Civil Rights in the 1950s and '60s, and the emergence of today's black middle class. From Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass to Martin Luther King, Jr., and Louis Farrakhan, To Make Our World Anew is an unforgettable portrait of a people.

Preacher Woman Sings the Blues

The Autobiographies of Nineteenth-century African American Evangelists
Author: Richard J. Douglass-Chin
Publisher: University of Missouri Press
ISBN: 9780826263018
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 240
View: 317

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Hip Hop's Amnesia

From Blues and the Black Women's Club Movement to Rap and the Hip Hop Movement
Author: Reiland Rabaka
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 0739174924
Category: Music
Page: 354
View: 6604

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What did rap music and hip hop culture inherit from the spirituals, classic blues, ragtime, classic jazz, and bebop? What did rap music and hip hop culture inherit from the Black Women's Club Movement, New Negro Movement, Harlem Renaissance, Hipster Movement, and Black Muslim Movement? In Hip Hop's Amnesia award-winning author, spoken-word artist, and multi-instrumentalist Reiland Rabaka answers these questions by rescuing and reclaiming the often-overlooked early twentieth century origins and evolution of rap music and hip hop culture.

The Struggle for Equal Adulthood

Gender, Race, Age, and the Fight for Citizenship in Antebellum America
Author: Corinne T. Field
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 146961815X
Category: Social Science
Page: 260
View: 8930

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In the fight for equality, early feminists often cited the infantilization of women and men of color as a method used to keep them out of power. Corinne T. Field argues that attaining adulthood--and the associated political rights, economic opportunities, and sexual power that come with it--became a common goal for both white and African American feminists between the American Revolution and the Civil War. The idea that black men and all women were more like children than adult white men proved difficult to overcome, however, and continued to serve as a foundation for racial and sexual inequality for generations. In detailing the connections between the struggle for equality and concepts of adulthood, Field provides an essential historical context for understanding the dilemmas black and white women still face in America today, from "glass ceilings" and debates over welfare dependency to a culture obsessed with youth and beauty. Drawn from a fascinating past, this book tells the history of how maturity, gender, and race collided, and how those affected came together to fight against injustice.

The Challenge of American History


Author: Louis P. Masur
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 9780801862229
Category: History
Page: 331
View: 4104

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In The Challenge of American History, Louis Masur brings together a sampling of recent scholarship to determine the key issues preoccupying historians of American history and to contemplate the discipline's direction for the future. The fifteen summary essays included in this volume allow professional historians, history teachers, and students to grasp in a convenient and accessible form what historians have been writing about.

A History of the African American People

The History, Traditions & Culture of African Americans
Author: James Oliver Horton,Lois E. Horton
Publisher: Wayne State University Press
ISBN: 9780814326978
Category: History
Page: 208
View: 9226

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Examines the social and communal history of African Americans from 1650 through 1995

A People and a Nation: A History of the United States


Author: Mary Beth Norton,Carol Sheriff,David W. Blight,Howard Chudacoff
Publisher: Cengage Learning
ISBN: 0495915254
Category: History
Page: 1088
View: 1023

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A PEOPLE AND A NATION is a best-selling text offering a spirited narrative that tells the stories of all people in the United States. The authors’ attention to race and racial identity and their inclusion of everyday people and popular culture brings history to life, engaging readers and encouraging them to imagine what life was really like in the past. Available in the following split options: A PEOPLE AND A NATION, Ninth Edition (Chapters 1-33), ISBN: 978-0-495-91525-6; Volume I: To 1877 (Chapters 1-16), ISBN: 978-0-495-91589-8; Volume II: Since 1865 (Chapters 16-33), ISBN: 978-0-495-91590-4. Important Notice: Media content referenced within the product description or the product text may not be available in the ebook version.

A History of the Book in America, 5-volume Omnibus E-book

Includes all Five Volumes
Author: David D. Hall
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469628961
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 7095

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The five volumes in A History of the Book in America offer a sweeping chronicle of our country's print production and culture from colonial times to the end of the twentieth century. This interdisciplinary, collaborative work of scholarship examines the book trades as they have developed and spread throughout the United States; provides a history of U.S. literary cultures; investigates the practice of reading and, more broadly, the uses of literacy; and links literary culture with larger themes in American history. Now available for the first time, this complete Omnibus ebook contains all 5 volumes of this landmark work. Volume 1 The Colonial Book in the Atlantic World Edited by Hugh Amory and David D. Hall 664 pp., 51 illus. Volume 2 An Extensive Republic: Print, Culture, and Society in the New Nation, 1790-1840 Edited by Robert A. Gross and Mary Kelley 712 pp., 66 illus. Volume 3 The Industrial Book, 1840-1880 Edited by Scott E. Casper, Jeffrey D. Groves, Stephen W. Nissenbaum, and Michael Winship 560 pp., 43 illus. Volume 4 Print in Motion: The Expansion of Publishing and Reading in the United States, 1880-1940 Edited by Carl F. Kaestle and Janice A. Radway 688 pp., 74 illus. Volume 5 The Enduring Book: Print Culture in Postwar America Edited by David Paul Nord, Joan Shelley Rubin, and Michael Schudson 632 pp., 95 illus.

Beauty Shop Politics

African American Women's Activism in the Beauty Industry
Author: Tiffany M. Gill
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 0252076966
Category: Health & Fitness
Page: 192
View: 4890

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Looking through the lens of black business history, Beauty Shop Politics shows how black beauticians in the Jim Crow era parlayed their economic independence and access to a public community space into platforms for activism. Tiffany M. Gill argues that the beauty industry played a crucial role in the creation of the modern black female identity and that the seemingly frivolous space of a beauty salon actually has stimulated social, political, and economic change. From the founding of the National Negro Business League in 1900 and onward, African Americans have embraced the entrepreneurial spirit by starting their own businesses, but black women's forays into the business world were overshadowed by those of black men. With a broad scope that encompasses the role of gossip in salons, ethnic beauty products, and the social meanings of African American hair textures, Gill shows how African American beauty entrepreneurs built and sustained a vibrant culture of activism in beauty salons and schools. Enhanced by lucid portrayals of black beauticians and drawing on archival research and oral histories, Beauty Shop Politics conveys the everyday operations and rich culture of black beauty salons as well as their role in building community.