The Global Cold War

Third World Interventions and the Making of Our Times
Author: Odd Arne Westad
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139643827
Category: History
Page: N.A
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The Cold War shaped the world we live in today - its politics, economics, and military affairs. This book shows how the globalization of the Cold War during the last century created the foundations for most of the key conflicts we see today, including the War on Terror. It focuses on how the Third World policies of the two twentieth-century superpowers - the United States and the Soviet Union - gave rise to resentments and resistance that in the end helped topple one superpower and still seriously challenge the other. Ranging from China to Indonesia, Iran, Ethiopia, Angola, Cuba, and Nicaragua, it provides a truly global perspective on the Cold War. And by exploring both the development of interventionist ideologies and the revolutionary movements that confronted interventions, the book links the past with the present in ways that no other major work on the Cold War era has succeeded in doing.

The Global Cold War

Third World Interventions and the Making of Our Times
Author: Patrick Glenn
Publisher: CRC Press
ISBN: 1351351346
Category:
Page: N.A
View: 3572

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For those who lived through the Cold War period, and for many of the historians who study it, it seemed self-evident that the critical incidents that determined its course took place in the northern hemisphere, specifically in the face-off between NATO and the Warsaw Pact in Europe. In this view, the Berlin Wall mattered more than the Ho Chi Minh Trail, and the Soviet intervention in Hungary was vastly more significant than Soviet intervention in Korea. It was only the fine balance of power in the northern theatre that redirected the attentions of the USA and the USSR elsewhere, and resulted in outbreaks of proxy warfare elsewhere in the globe - in Korea, in Vietnam and in Africa. Odd Arne Westad's triumph is to look at the history of these times through the other end of the telescope - to reconceptualize the Cold War as something that fundamentally happened in the Third World, not the First. The thesis he presents in The Global Cold War is highly creative. It upends much conventional wisdom and points out that the determining factor in the struggle was not geopolitics, but ideology - an ideology, moreover, that was heavily flavoured by elements of colonialist thinking that ought to have been alien to the mindsets of two avowedly anti-colonial superpowers. Westad's work is a fine example of the creative thinking skill of coming up with new connections and fresh solutions; it also never shies away from generating new hypotheses or redefining issues in order to see them in new ways.

Der Kalte Krieg

1947-1991
Author: Bernd Stöver
Publisher: C.H.Beck
ISBN: 3406706126
Category: Political Science
Page: 528
View: 8485

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Der Kalte Krieg zwischen den USA und der Sowjetunion - zwischen liberaler Demokratie und Kommunismus - wurde weltweit und auf allen Ebenen geführt: militärisch, politisch, wirtschaftlich und kulturell. Bernd Stöver beschreibt in seinem viel gerühmten Standardwerk die Konfrontation der beiden Supermächte vom Ende des Zweiten Weltkriegs über den Mauerbau in Berlin, die militärisch hoch brisante Kuba-Krise, den Vietnamkrieg und zahllose Stellvertreterkriege in der Dritten Welt bis zum Zerfall der Sowjetunion 1991.

Der Kalte Krieg


Author: Bernd Stöver
Publisher: C.H.Beck
ISBN: 9783406480140
Category: Cold War
Page: 128
View: 6921

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Der Kalte Krieg zwischen den USA und der Sowjetunion - zwischen liberaler Demokratie und Kommunismus - hat für fast ein halbes Jahrhundert die Weltpolitik bestimmt. In diesem "totalen Krieg" wurden auf beiden Seiten massive Anstrengungen unternommen, um Waffenarsenale anzuhäufen, Einflußsphären zu sichern oder den Gegner auszuspionieren. Bernd Stöver schildert allgemeinverständlich die Konfrontation der Supermächte vom Zweiten Weltkrieg bis zur Auflösung der Sowjetunion 1991. (Quelle: www.weltbild.ch).

Der Kalte Krieg

eine neue Geschichte
Author: John Lewis Gaddis
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9783570550571
Category:
Page: 384
View: 7055

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Decolonization and the Cold War

Negotiating Independence
Author: Leslie James,Elisabeth Leake
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1472571215
Category: History
Page: 336
View: 2998

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The Cold War and decolonization transformed the twentieth century world. This volume brings together an international line-up of experts to explore how these transformations took place and expand on some of the latest threads of analysis to help inform our understanding of the links between the two phenomena. The book begins by exploring ideas of modernity, development, and economics as Cold War and postcolonial projects and goes on to look at the era's intellectual history and investigate how emerging forms of identity fought for supremacy. Finally, the contributors question ideas of sovereignty and state control that move beyond traditional Cold War narratives. Decolonization and the Cold War emphasizes new approaches by drawing on various methodologies, regions, themes, and interdisciplinary work, to shed new light on two topics that are increasingly important to historians of the twentieth century.

Gorbatschow

Der Mann und seine Zeit
Author: William Taubman
Publisher: C.H.Beck
ISBN: 3406700454
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 935
View: 8666

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Im Ausland verehrt und bewundert als der Mann, der das Tor zu einem neuen Zeitalter aufstieß, gilt er bei seinen Landsleuten als Schwächling und Totengräber des sowjetischen Imperiums: Michail Gorbatschow ist für die einen ein überragender Staatsmann und für die anderen ein Versager. Pulitzerpreisträger William Taubman legt nun die grundlegende Biographie dieser Jahrhundertgestalt vor – akribisch recherchiert, fundiert im Urteil und fesselnd geschrieben. Als Michail Gorbatschow 1985 mit 54 Jahren jüngster Generalsekretär in der Geschichte der KPdSU wurde, war die Sowjetunion eine von zwei Supermächten. Doch nur vier Jahre später hatten Perestroika und Glasnost die Sowjetunion für immer verändert und Gorbatschow mehr Feinde als Freunde. Seine Politik beendete den Kalten Krieg. Doch im Jahr darauf musste er nach einem gescheiterten Putsch – ohne es zu wollen – dem Kollaps jenes Imperiums zuschauen, das er zu retten versucht hatte. William Taubman schildert in seinem Buch, wie ein Bauernjunge vom Lande es bis an die Spitze im Kreml bringt, sich mit Amerikas erzkonservativem Präsidenten Ronald Reagan anfreundet und es der UdSSR und dem Ostblock erlaubt, sich aufzulösen, ohne Zuflucht zur Gewalt zu nehmen. Wer war dieses „Rätsel Gorbatschow“ – ein wahrhaft großer Politiker oder ein Mann, der an seinen eigenen Fehlern scheiterte und an Mächten, gegen die er nicht gewinnen konnte?

The Cambridge History of the Cold War: Volume 1, Origins


Author: Melvyn P. Leffler,Odd Arne Westad
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316025616
Category: History
Page: N.A
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This volume examines the origins and early years of the Cold War. In the first comprehensive reexamination of the period, a team of leading scholars shows how the conflict evolved from the geopolitical, ideological, economic and sociopolitical environments of the two world wars and interwar period, and discusses how markets, ideas and cultural interactions affected political discourse, diplomacy and strategy after World War II. The chapters focus not only on the United States and the Soviet Union, but also on critical regions such as Europe, the Balkans and East Asia. The authors consider the most influential statesmen of the era and address issues that mattered to people around the globe: food, nutrition and resource allocation; ethnicity, race and religion; science and technology; national autonomy, self-determination and sovereignty. In so doing, they illuminate how people worldwide shaped the evolution of the increasingly bipolar conflict and, in turn, were ensnared by it.

The Cambridge History of the Cold War: Volume 3, Endings


Author: Melvyn P. Leffler,Odd Arne Westad
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316025632
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 4796

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Volume III of The Cambridge History of the Cold War examines the evolution of the conflict from the Helsinki Conference of 1975 until the Soviet collapse in 1991. A team of leading scholars analyzes the economic, social, cultural, religious, technological and geopolitical factors that ended the Cold War and discusses the personalities and policies of key leaders such as Brezhnev, Reagan, Gorbachev, Thatcher, Kohl and Deng Xiaoping. The authors show how events throughout the world shaped the evolution of Soviet-American relations and they explore the legacies of the superpower confrontation in a comparative and transnational perspective. Individual chapters examine how the Cold War affected and was affected by environmental issues, economic trends, patterns of consumption, human rights and non-governmental organizations. The volume represents the new international history at its best, emphasizing broad social, economic, demographic and strategic developments while keeping politics and human agency in focus.

The Parchment of Kashmir

History, Society, and Polity
Author: N. Khan
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 1137029587
Category: Political Science
Page: 262
View: 2045

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A cross-disciplinary anthology on contemporary Kashmir by academics from Jammu and Kashmir, the first such volume to appear. The book offers a panorama of key cultural concerns of Jammu and Kashmir today, incorporating analysis of military, cultural, religious, and social aspects of the society and polity.

The Middle East and the Cold War

Between Security and Development
Author: Massimiliano Trentin,Matteo Gerlini
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: 1443837229
Category: History
Page: 190
View: 9761

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There have been quite a lot of attempts to find out exactly what the impact of the Cold War on the Middle East was, and this from different disciplinary perspectives. This volumes tries to integrate the historical debate with new fresh insights thanks to the works of young scholars who are currently engaged in archival and field research. Algeria, Sudan, Jordan as well as Syria, Israel and Iran during the embattled 1950s and 1960s are the objects of this volume, which draws a much more complicated picture than one might expect. As a matter of fact, both the Cold War superpowers and their European allies proved constrained in their interventions to shape the political and economic dynamics of the region according to their own plans: on the contrary, Middle Eastern rulers enjoyed remarkable autonomy to achieve their goals, and fully exploited, in rhetorics and practice, the competition and rivalry which divided the industrial countries during the Cold War. The process of decolonization and the related construction of new patterns of national sovereignty and development were major issues at stake for both the Cold War camps and their postcolonial partners in the Middle East. Though peculiar, the region proved to be no exception to global trends. The so called “liberal” Fifties as well as the “radical” Sixties of the XXth century were times of great conflict and change, setting much of the institutions and patterns of development which lasted for three decades, at least, but also providing fresh opportunities for new social and politics groups to emerge and consolidate in power. In light of the current events in North Africa and the Middle East at large, this volume is a highly valuable contribution to the deeper and wider understanding of the region in itself as well as the patterns of its integration within the wider, global world

Uncertain Empire

American History and the Idea of the Cold War
Author: Joel Isaac,Duncan Bell
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199986665
Category: History
Page: 314
View: 2758

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Historians have long understood that the notion of "the cold war" is richly metaphorical, if not paradoxical. The conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union was a war that fell ambiguously short of war, an armed truce that produced considerable bloodshed. Yet scholars in the rapidly expanding field of Cold War studies have seldom paused to consider the conceptual and chronological foundations of the idea of the Cold War itself. In Uncertain Empire, a group of leading scholars takes up the challenge of making sense of the idea of the Cold War and its application to the writing of American history. They interrogate the concept from a wide range of disciplinary vantage points--diplomatic history, the history of science, literary criticism, cultural history, and the history of religion--highlighting the diversity of methods and approaches in contemporary Cold War studies. Animating the volume as a whole is a question about the extent to which the Cold War was an American invention. Uncertain Empire brings debates over national, global, and transnational history into focus and offers students of the Cold War a new framework for considering recent developments in the field.

The Global Offensive

The United States, the Palestine Liberation Organization, and the Making of the Post-Cold War Order
Author: Paul Thomas Chamberlin
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199977119
Category: History
Page: 336
View: 5046

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On March 21, 1968, Yasir Arafat and his guerrillas made the fateful decision to break with conventional guerrilla tactics, choosing to stand and fight an Israeli attack on the al-Karama refugee camp in Jordan. They suffered terrible casualties, but they won a stunning symbolic victory that transformed Arafat into an Arab hero and allowed him to launch a worldwide campaign, one that would reshape Cold War diplomacy and revolutionary movements everywhere. In The Global Offensive, historian Paul Thomas Chamberlin offers new insights into the rise of the Palestine Liberation Organization in its full international context. After defeat in the 1967 war, the crushing of a guerrilla campaign on the West Bank, and the attack on al-Karama, Arafat and his fellow guerilla fighters opened a global offensive aimed at achieving national liberation for the Palestinian people. In doing so, they reinvented themselves as players on the world stage, combining controversial armed attacks, diplomacy, and radical politics. They forged a network of nationalist revolutionaries, making alliances with South African rebels, Latin American insurrectionists, and Vietnamese Communists. They persuaded the United Nations to take up their agenda, and sent Americans and Soviets scrambling as these stateless forces drew new connections across the globe. "The Vietnamese and Palestinian people have much in common," General Vo Nguyen Giap would tell Arafat, "just like two people suffering from the same illness." Richard Nixon's views mirrored Giap's: "You cannot separate what happens to America in Vietnam from the Mideast or from Europe or any place else." Deftly argued and based on extensive new research, The Global Offensive will change the way we think of the history of not only the PLO, but also the Cold War and international relations since.

The Great American Mission

Modernization and the Construction of an American World Order
Author: David Ekbladh
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691152454
Category: History
Page: 408
View: 4932

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The Great American Mission traces how America's global modernization efforts during the twentieth century were a means to remake the world in its own image. David Ekbladh shows that the emerging concept of modernization combined existing development ideas from the Depression. He describes how ambitious New Deal programs like the Tennessee Valley Authority became symbols of American liberalism's ability to marshal the social sciences, state planning, civil society, and technology to produce extensive social and economic change. For proponents, it became a valuable weapon to check the influence of menacing ideologies such as Fascism and Communism. Modernization took on profound geopolitical importance as the United States grappled with these threats. After World War II, modernization remained a means to contain the growing influence of the Soviet Union. Ekbladh demonstrates how U.S.-led nation-building efforts in global hot spots, enlisting an array of nongovernmental groups and international organizations, were a basic part of American strategy in the Cold War. However, a close connection to the Vietnam War and the upheavals of the 1960s would discredit modernization. The end of the Cold War further obscured modernization's mission, but many of its assumptions regained prominence after September 11 as the United States moved to contain new threats. Using new sources and perspectives, The Great American Mission offers new and challenging interpretations of America's ideological motivations and humanitarian responsibilities abroad.

The Routledge Handbook of the Cold War


Author: Artemy M. Kalinovsky,Craig Daigle
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134700725
Category: Political Science
Page: 440
View: 1260

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This new Handbook offers a wide-ranging overview of current scholarship on the Cold War, with essays from many leading scholars. The field of Cold War history has consistently been one of the most vibrant in the field of international studies. Recent scholarship has added to our understanding of familiar Cold War events, such as the Korean War, the Cuban Missile Crisis and superpower détente, and shed new light on the importance of ideology, race, modernization, and transnational movements. The Routledge Handbook of the Cold War draws on the wealth of new Cold War scholarship, bringing together essays on a diverse range of topics such as geopolitics, military power and technology and strategy. The chapters also address the importance of non-state actors, such as scientists, human rights activists and the Catholic Church, and examine the importance of development, foreign aid and overseas assistance. The volume is organised into nine parts: Part I: The Early Cold War Part II: Cracks in the Bloc Part III: Decolonization, Imperialism and its Consequences Part IV: The Cold War in the Third World Part V: The Era of Detente Part VI: Human Rights and Non-State Actors Part VII: Nuclear Weapons, Technology and Intelligence Part VIII: Psychological Warfare, Propaganda and Cold War Culture Part IX: The End of the Cold War This new Handbook will be of great interest to all students of Cold War history, international history, foreign policy, security studies and IR in general.

Diplomatic Games

Sport, Statecraft, and International Relations since 1945
Author: Heather L. Dichter,Andrew L. Johns
Publisher: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 081314566X
Category: Political Science
Page: 496
View: 5366

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International sporting events, including the Olympic Games and the FIFA World Cup, have experienced profound growth in popularity and significance since the mid-twentieth century. Sports often facilitate diplomacy, revealing common interests across borders and uniting groups of people who are otherwise divided by history, ethnicity, or politics. In many countries, popular athletes have become diplomatic envoys. Sport is an arena in which international conflict and compromise find expression, yet the impact of sports on foreign relations has not been widely studied by scholars. In Diplomatic Games, a team of international scholars examines how the nexus of sport and foreign relations has driven political and cultural change since 1945, demonstrating how governments have used athletic competition to maintain and strengthen alliances, promote policies, and increase national prestige. The contributors investigate topics such as China's use of sports to oppose Western imperialism, the ways in which sports helped bring an end to apartheid in South Africa, and the impact of the United States' 1980 Olympic boycott on U.S.-Soviet relations. Bringing together innovative scholarship from around the globe, this groundbreaking collection makes a compelling case for the use of sport as a lens through which to view international relations.

Tyranny of the Weak

North Korea and the World, 1950–1992
Author: Charles K. Armstrong
Publisher: Cornell University Press
ISBN: 0801468930
Category: History
Page: 328
View: 2750

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To much of the world, North Korea is an impenetrable mystery, its inner workings unknown and its actions toward the outside unpredictable and frequently provocative. Tyranny of the Weak reveals for the first time the motivations, processes, and effects of North Korea's foreign relations during the Cold War era. Drawing on extensive research in the archives of North Korea's present and former communist allies, including the Soviet Union, China, and East Germany, Charles K. Armstrong tells in vivid detail how North Korea managed its alliances with fellow communist states, maintained a precarious independence in the Sino-Soviet split, attempted to reach out to the capitalist West and present itself as a model for Third World development, and confronted and engaged with its archenemies, the United States and South Korea. From the invasion that set off the Korean War in June 1950 to the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, Tyranny of the Weak shows how—despite its objective weakness—North Korea has managed for much of its history to deal with the outside world to its maximum advantage. Insisting on a path of "self-reliance" since the 1950s, North Korea has continually resisted pressure to change from enemies and allies alike. A worldview formed in the crucible of the Korean War and Cold War still maintains a powerful hold on North Korea in the twenty-first century, and understanding those historical forces is as urgent today as it was sixty years ago.

Mapping the Cold War

Cartography and the Framing of America’s International Power
Author: Timothy Barney
Publisher: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 1469618559
Category: History
Page: 338
View: 2629

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In this fascinating history of Cold War cartography, Timothy Barney considers maps as central to the articulation of ideological tensions between American national interests and international aspirations. Barney argues that the borders, scales, projections, and other conventions of maps prescribed and constrained the means by which foreign policy elites, popular audiences, and social activists navigated conflicts between North and South, East and West. Maps also influenced how identities were formed in a world both shrunk by advancing technologies and marked by expanding and shifting geopolitical alliances and fissures. Pointing to the necessity of how politics and values were "spatialized" in recent U.S. history, Barney argues that Cold War–era maps themselves had rhetorical lives that began with their conception and production and played out in their circulation within foreign policy circles and popular media. Reflecting on the ramifications of spatial power during the period, Mapping the Cold War ultimately demonstrates that even in the twenty-first century, American visions of the world--and the maps that account for them--are inescapably rooted in the anxieties of that earlier era.

The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War


Author: Stephen Kinzer
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 1429953527
Category: History
Page: 416
View: 3208

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A joint biography of John Foster Dulles and Allen Dulles, who led the United States into an unseen war that decisively shaped today's world During the 1950s, when the Cold War was at its peak, two immensely powerful brothers led the United States into a series of foreign adventures whose effects are still shaking the world. John Foster Dulles was secretary of state while his brother, Allen Dulles, was director of the Central Intelligence Agency. In this book, Stephen Kinzer places their extraordinary lives against the background of American culture and history. He uses the framework of biography to ask: Why does the United States behave as it does in the world? The Brothers explores hidden forces that shape the national psyche, from religious piety to Western movies—many of which are about a noble gunman who cleans up a lawless town by killing bad guys. This is how the Dulles brothers saw themselves, and how many Americans still see their country's role in the world. Propelled by a quintessentially American set of fears and delusions, the Dulles brothers launched violent campaigns against foreign leaders they saw as threats to the United States. These campaigns helped push countries from Guatemala to the Congo into long spirals of violence, led the United States into the Vietnam War, and laid the foundation for decades of hostility between the United States and countries from Cuba to Iran. The story of the Dulles brothers is the story of America. It illuminates and helps explain the modern history of the United States and the world. A Kirkus Reviews Best Nonfiction Book of 2013