The Genius of Shakespeare

Picador Classic
Author: Jonathan Bate
Publisher: Pan Macmillan
ISBN: 1509822542
Category:
Page: 432
View: 5377

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With an introduction by Simon CallowJudgements about the quality of works of art begin in opinion. But for the last two hundred years only the wilfully perverse (and Tolstoy) have denied the validity of the opinion that Shakespeare was a genius. Who was Shakespeare? Why has his writing endured? And what makes it so endlessly adaptable to different times and cultures? Exploring Shakespeare's life, including questions of authorship and autobiography, and charting how his legacy has grown over the centuries, this extraordinary book asks how Shakespeare has come to be such a powerful symbol of genius. Written with lively passion and wit, The Genius of Shakespeare is a fascinating biography of the life - and afterlife - of our greatest poet. Jonathan Bate, one of the world's leading Shakespearean scholars, has shown how the legend of Shakespeare's genius was created and sustained, and how the man himself became a truly global phenomenon. 'The best modern book on Shakespeare' Sir Peter Hall

The RSC Shakespeare: The Complete Works

The Complete Works
Author: William Shakespeare,Jonathan Bate,Eric Rasmussen
Publisher: Palgrave
ISBN: 9780230003507
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 2552
View: 894

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Developed in partnership with The Royal Shakespeare Company, this fresh new Complete Works combines the very latest scholarship with elegant writing and design. It boasts a wealth of features that will appeal to public and academic libraries, teachers, students and lovers of Shakespeare everywhere, including: A definitive modernized edition of Shakespeare's text based on the 1623 First Folio (the first and original Complete Works lovingly assembled by Shakespeare's fellow actors and the version of Shakespeare's text preferred by many actors and directors today); Thought-provoking essays on each play and a superb general introduction by Professor Jonathan Bate; Jargon-free on-page notes which explain words or references unfamiliar to modern audiences; Photographs of classic or unusual performances; Clear, single-column page design, with plenty of space for writing notes; A key facts 'box' for each play which summarises the plot, major roles, language and sources. Leading the editorial team is renowned Shakespearean scholar Professor Jonathan Bate who has worked in close collaboration over many years with the artists and archivists at the RSC. His introductions and notes draw on a unique wealth of experience and resources and will help the reader to understand Shakespeare's plays as they were originally intended - as living theatre to be enjoyed and performed.

Shakespeare After All


Author: Marjorie Garber
Publisher: Anchor
ISBN: 9780307490810
Category: Drama
Page: 1008
View: 9150

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A brilliant and companionable tour through all thirty-eight plays, Shakespeare After All is the perfect introduction to the bard by one of the country’s foremost authorities on his life and work. Drawing on her hugely popular lecture courses at Yale and Harvard over the past thirty years, Marjorie Garber offers passionate and revealing readings of the plays in chronological sequence, from The Two Gentlemen of Verona to The Two Noble Kinsmen. Supremely readable and engaging, and complete with a comprehensive introduction to Shakespeare’s life and times and an extensive bibliography, this magisterial work is an ever-replenishing fount of insight on the most celebrated writer of all time.

Soul of the Age

A Biography of the Mind of William Shakespeare
Author: Jonathan Bate
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 9781588367815
Category: Drama
Page: 496
View: 3501

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“One man in his time plays many parts, His acts being seven ages.” In this illuminating, innovative biography, Jonathan Bate, one of today’s most accomplished Shakespearean scholars, has found a fascinating new way to tell the story of the great dramatist. Using the Bard’s own immortal list of a man’s seven ages in As You Like It, Bate deduces the crucial events of Shakespeare’s life and connects them to his world and work as never before. Here is the author as an infant, born into a world of plague and syphillis, diseases with which he became closely familiar; as a schoolboy, a position he portrayed in The Merry Wives of Windsor, in which a clever, cheeky lad named William learns Latin grammar; as a lover, married at eighteen to an older woman already pregnant, perhaps presaging Bassanio, who in The Merchant of Venice won a wife who could save him from financial ruin. Here, too, is Shakespeare as a soldier, writing Henry the Fifth’s St. Crispin’s Day speech, with a nod to his own monarch Elizabeth I’s passionate addresses; as a justice, revealing his possible legal training in his precise use of the law in plays from Hamlet to Macbeth; and as a pantaloon, an early retiree because of, Bate postulates, either illness or a scandal. Finally, Shakespeare enters oblivion, with sonnets that suggest he actively sought immortality through his art and secretly helped shape his posthumous image more than anyone ever knew. Equal parts masterly detective story, brilliant literary analysis, and insightful world history, Soul of the Age is more than a superb new recounting of Shakespeare’s experiences; it is a bold and entertaining work of scholarship and speculation, one that shifts from past to present, reality to the imagination, to reveal how this unsurpassed artist came to be. From the Hardcover edition.

Shakespeare's Language


Author: Frank Kermode
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 0374527741
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 256
View: 2526

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Plumbing the sweet mysteries of Shakespeare's "language," the author argues that the Bard's tragedies were probably difficult even for his contemporaries to understand and identifies a shift in Shakespeare's use of language around 1600. Reprint. 15,000 first printing.

Shakespeare's Britain


Author: Jonathan Bate,Dora Thornton
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780714128269
Category: England
Page: 96
View: 8490

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From the common playgoers to the royal patrons, this book explores Britain from the perspective of Shakespeare's audience revealing how the significant issues of the day were explored at the playhouse through objects and quotations from Shakespeare's plays.

RSC Shakespeare Complete Works


Author: William Shakespeare,Jonathan Bate,Eric Rasmussen,Royal Shakespeare Company
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780230003514
Category: English drama
Page: 2549
View: 1366

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Developed in partnership with The Royal Shakespeare Company, this guide to the complete works of Shakespeare will appeal to public and academic libraries, teachers, students and lovers of Shakespeare.

Soul of the Age

The Life, Mind and World of William Shakespeare
Author: Jonathan Bate
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141917768
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 512
View: 9028

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How did plague turn Shakespeare from a jobbing hack into a courtly poet? How did Bottom's dream rewrite the Bible? How did Shakespeare's plays lead to the deaths of an earl and a king? And why was he the one dramatist of his generation never to be imprisoned? Weaving a dazzling tapestry of Elizabethan beliefs and obsessions, private passions and political intrigues, Soul of the Age leads us on an exhilarating tour of the extraordinary, colourful and often violent world that shaped and informed Shakespeare's thinking. Written by one of the world's leading experts, it combines almost everything there is to know about the man and his work in one sensational narrative, and brings us closer than ever to understanding what being Shakespeare was actually like.

Hamlet


Author: William Shakespeare
Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education
ISBN: 0230217877
Category: Drama
Page: 256
View: 728

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From the Royal Shakespeare Company – a fresh new edition of Shakespeare's most celebrated play. This book includes: * An introduction to Hamlet by award-winning scholar Jonathan Bate * The play – with clear explanatory notes on each page * A scene-by-scene analysis * An introduction to Shakespeare's career and the Elizabethan theatre * A rich exploration of approaches to staging Hamlet The most enjoyable way to understand a Shakespeare play is to see it or participate in it. This book presents a historical overview of Hamlet in performance, recommends film versions, takes a detailed look at specific productions and includes interviews with three leading Directors – Michael Boyd, Ron Daniels and John Caird – so that we may get a sense of the extraordinary variety of interpretations that are possible - a variety that gives Shakespeare his unique capacity to be reinvented and made 'our contemporary' four centuries after his death.

Shakespeare in Fluff


Author: Boxtree
Publisher: Pan Macmillan
ISBN: 0752266241
Category: Humor
Page: N.A
View: 7164

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O Romeo, Romeo! Where fur art though Romeo? William Shakespeare has given us so many of the most iconic moments in literary history. From the tortured existential genius of Hamlet's "To be or not to be", or the complex violence of Macbeth's "Is this a dagger I see before me" and the heart-breaking romance of Romeo and Juliet's balcony scene, millions of us have been moved to laughter and tears by his timeless poetry. Now, finally, we're able to experience these moments through the medium of small furry animals.

Shakespeare the Thinker


Author: Anthony David Nuttall
Publisher: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300119283
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 428
View: 820

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Offers a critical analysis of the themes, ideas, and preoccupation exemplified in the body of Shakespeare's work, including the nature of motive, cause, personal identity and relation, the status of imagination, ethics and subjectivity, and language and its capacity to occlude and communicate, in a study that emphasizes the link between great literature and its social and historical matrix.

Banvard's Folly

Thirteen Tales of Renowned Obscurity, Famous Anonymity, and Rotten Luck
Author: Paul Collins
Publisher: Picador
ISBN: 1466892056
Category: History
Page: 272
View: 4212

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The historical record crowns success. Those enshrined in its annals are men and women whose ideas, accomplishments, or personalities have dominated, endured, and most important of all, found champions. John F. Kennedy's Profiles in Courage, Giorgio Vasari's Lives of the Artists, and Samuel Johnson's Lives of the Poets are classic celebrations of the greatest, the brightest, the eternally constellated. Paul Collins' Banvard's Folly is a different kind of book. Here are thirteen unforgettable portraits of forgotten people: men and women who might have claimed their share of renown but who, whether from ill timing, skullduggery, monomania, the tinge of madness, or plain bad luck--or perhaps some combination of them all--leapt straight from life into thankless obscurity. Among their number are scientists, artists, writers, entrepreneurs, and adventurers, from across the centuries and around the world. They hold in common the silenced aftermath of failure, the name that rings no bells. Collins brings them back to glorious life. John Banvard was an artist whose colossal panoramic canvasses (one behemoth depiction of the entire eastern shore of the Mississippi River was simply known as "The Three Mile Painting") made him the richest and most famous artist of his day. . . before he decided to go head to head with P. T. Barnum. René Blondot was a distinguished French physicist whose celebrated discovery of a new form of radiation, called the N-Ray, went terribly awry. At the tender age of seventeen, William Henry Ireland signed "William Shakespeare" to a book and launched a short but meteoric career as a forger of undiscovered works by the Bard -- until he pushed his luck too far. John Symmes, a hero of the War of 1812, nearly succeeded in convincing Congress to fund an expedition to the North Pole, where he intended to prove his theory that the earth was hollow and ripe for exploitation; his quixotic quest counted Jules Verne and Edgar Allan Poe among its greatest admirers. Collins' love for what he calls the "forgotten ephemera of genius" give his portraits of these figures and the other nine men and women in Banvard's Folly sympathetic depth and poignant relevance. Their effect is not to make us sneer or p0revel in schadenfreude; here are no cautionary tales. Rather, here are brief introductions-acts of excavation and reclamation-to people whom history may have forgotten, but whom now we cannot.

Shakespeare: A Complete Introduction


Author: Michael Scott
Publisher: Teach Yourself
ISBN: 1473612799
Category: Drama
Page: 432
View: 4219

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Your complete introduction to Shakespeare William Shakespeare has been hailed as one of the greatest thinkers of all time, one of the world's finest artists, poets and dramatists. Shakespeare: A Complete Introduction introduces and explains the plays by looking at how they work, taking you on a journey through the genres of comedy, history and tragedy. The best known and most popular plays are discussed in detail and even plays in which Shakespeare may have had only the briefest creative and collaborative interest as a writer, get at least a mention. With material on his poetry and discussions on aspects of his life too, this truly is a complete introduction to Shakespeare. 'A very lively and enthusiastic introduction to the full range of Shakespeare's plays' John Drakakis, Professor of English, University of Stirling 'A masterpiece of the genre, written as it is with passion, without condescension, without jargon, thoughtful and open to changing critical theories, but always returning to the plays themselves, plays that fully reveal themselves most in performance.' Martin Wine, Professor Emeritus of English at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC)

John Clare

A Biography
Author: Jonathan Bate
Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 1466895454
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 672
View: 1178

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The long-awaited literary biography of the supreme "poets' poet" John Clare (1793-1864) is the greatest labouring-class poet that England has ever produced. No one has ever written more powerfully of nature, of a rural childhood, and of the alienated and unstable self, but until now he has never been the subject of a comprehensive literary biography. Here at last is his full story told by the light of his voluminous work: his birth in poverty, his work as an agricultural labourer, his burgeoning promise as a writer--cultivated under the gaze of rival patrons--then his moment of fame in the company of John Keats and the toast of literary London, and finally his decline into mental illness and his last years confined in asylums. Clare's ringing voice--quick-witted, passionate, vulnerable, courageous--emerges in generous quotation from his letters, journals, autobiographical writings, and his poems, as Jonathan Bate, the celebrated scholar of Shakespeare, brings the complex man, his beloved work, and his ribald world vividly to life.

Gould's Book of Fish


Author: Richard Flanagan
Publisher: Grove/Atlantic, Inc.
ISBN: 0802191991
Category: Fiction
Page: 416
View: 1176

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Winner of the Commonwealth Prize New York Times Book Review—Notable Fiction 2002 Entertainment Weekly—Best Fiction of 2002 Los Angeles Times Book Review—Best of the Best 2002 Washington Post Book World—Raves 2002 Chicago Tribune—Favorite Books of 2002 Christian Science Monitor—Best Books 2002 Publishers Weekly—Best Books of 2002 The Cleveland Plain Dealer—Year’s Best Books Minneapolis Star Tribune—Standout Books of 2002 Once upon a time, when the earth was still young, before the fish in the sea and all the living things on land began to be destroyed, a man named William Buelow Gould was sentenced to life imprisonment at the most feared penal colony in the British Empire, and there ordered to paint a book of fish. He fell in love with the black mistress of the warder and discovered too late that to love is not safe; he attempted to keep a record of the strange reality he saw in prison, only to realize that history is not written by those who are ruled. Acclaimed as a masterpiece around the world, Gould’s Book of Fish is at once a marvelously imagined epic of nineteenth-century Australia and a contemporary fable, a tale of horror, and a celebration of love, all transformed by a convict painter into pictures of fish.

The Song of the Earth


Author: Jonathan Bate
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674001688
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 335
View: 7949

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As we enter a new millennium ruled by technology, will poetry still matter? The Song of the Earth answers eloquently in the affirmative. A book about our growing alienation from nature, it is also a brilliant meditation on the capacity of the writer to bring us back to earth, our home. In the first ecological reading of English literature, Jonathan Bate traces the distinctions among "nature," "culture," and "environment" and shows how their meanings have changed since their appearance in the literature of the eighteenth century. An intricate interweaving of climatic, topographical, and political elements poetically deployed, his book ranges from greenhouses in Jane Austen's novels to fruit bats in the poetry of Les Murray, by way of Thomas Hardy's woodlands, Dr. Frankenstein's Creature, John Clare's birds' nests, Wordsworth's rivers, Byron's bear, and an early nineteenth-century novel about an orangutan who stands for Parliament. Though grounded in the English Romantic tradition, the book also explores American, Central European, and Caribbean poets and engages theoretically with Rousseau, Adorno, Bachelard, and especially Heidegger. The model for an innovative and sophisticated new "ecopoetics," The Song of the Earth is at once an essential history of environmental consciousness and an impassioned argument for the necessity of literature in a time of ecological crisis.

Lamentation


Author: C.J. Sansom
Publisher: Mulholland Books
ISBN: 0316254959
Category: Fiction
Page: 656
View: 1176

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As Henry VIII lies on his deathbed, an incendiary manuscript threatens to tear his court apart. Summer, 1546. King Henry VIII is slowly, painfully dying. His Protestant and Catholic councilors are engaged in a final and decisive power struggle; whoever wins will control the government. As heretics are hunted across London, and radical Protestants are burned at the stake, the Catholic party focuses its attack on Henry's sixth wife--and Matthew Shardlake's old mentor--Queen Catherine Parr. Shardlake, still haunted by his narrow escape from death the year before, steps into action when the beleaguered and desperate Queen summons him to Whitehall Palace to help her recover a dangerous manuscript. The Queen has authored a confessional book, Lamentation of a Sinner, so radically Protestant that if it came to the King's attention it could bring both her and her sympathizers crashing down. Although the secret book was kept hidden inside a locked chest in the Queen's private chamber, it has inexplicably vanished. Only one page has been recovered--clutched in the hand of a murdered London printer. Shardlake's investigations take him on a trail that begins among the backstreet printshops of London, but leads him and his trusty assistant Jack Barak into the dark and labyrinthine world of court politics, a world Shardlake swore never to enter again. In this crucible of power and ambition, Protestant friends can be as dangerous as Catholic enemies, and those with shifting allegiances can be the most dangerous of all.