The Snapper


Author: Roddy Doyle
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 1409046486
Category: Fiction
Page: 224
View: 4907

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Meet the Rabbitte family, motley bunch of loveable ne'er-do-wells whose everyday purgatory is rich with hangovers, dogshit and dirty dishes. When the older sister announces her pregnancy, the family are forced to rally together and discover the strangeness of intimacy. But the question remains: which friend of the family is the father of Sharon's child? By the bestselling author of The Commitments, now a long-running West End stage show. 'Unstoppable fun. A big-hearted, big-night out' The Times

The Gate


Author: Francois Bizot
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307428656
Category: History
Page: 304
View: 1521

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In 1971 a young French ethnologist named Francois Bizot was taken prisoner by forces of the Khmer Rouge who kept him chained in a jungle camp for months before releasing him. Four years later Bizot became the intermediary between the now victorious Khmer Rouge and the occupants of the besieged French embassy in Phnom Penh, eventually leading a desperate convoy of foreigners to safety across the Thai border. Out of those ordeals comes this transfixing book. At its center lies the relationship between Bizot and his principal captor, a man named Douch, who is today known as the most notorious of the Khmer Rouge’s torturers but who, for a while, was Bizot’s protector and friend. Written with the immediacy of a great novel, unsparing in its understanding of evil, The Gate manages to be at once wrenching and redemptive.

Through the Gate


Author: Sally Fawcett
Publisher: Exisle Publishing
ISBN: 1775593371
Category: Juvenile Fiction
Page: 32
View: 7037

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Barbarians at the Gate

The Fall of RJR Nabisco
Author: Bryan Burrough,John Helyar
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 9780061804038
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 624
View: 3623

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“One of the finest, most compelling accounts of what happened to corporate America and Wall Street in the 1980’s.” —New York Times Book Review A #1 New York Times bestseller and arguably the best business narrative ever written, Barbarians at the Gate is the classic account of the fall of RJR Nabisco. An enduring masterpiece of investigative journalism by Bryan Burrough and John Helyar, it includes a new afterword by the authors that brings this remarkable story of greed and double-dealings up to date twenty years after the famed deal. The Los Angeles Times calls Barbarians at the Gate, “Superlative.” The Chicago Tribune raves, “It’s hard to imagine a better story...and it’s hard to imagine a better account.” And in an era of spectacular business crashes and federal bailouts, it still stands as a valuable cautionary tale that must be heeded.

STRANGER AT THE GATE


Author: Mel White
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1501123998
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 272
View: 1538

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A Simon & Schuster eBook. Simon & Schuster has a great book for every reader.

The Gate of Angels


Author: Penelope Fitzgerald
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 9780395848388
Category: Fiction
Page: 167
View: 3173

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Young Fred Fairly, a junior fellow at St. Angelicus College in 1912 Cambridge, falls in love with the dangerously mysterious Daisy, whom he awakens next to one morning after a freak accident

Americans at the Gate

The United States and Refugees During the Cold War
Author: Carl J. Bon Tempo
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 0691123322
Category: History
Page: 264
View: 6595

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Unlike the 1930s, when the United States tragically failed to open its doors to Europeans fleeing Nazism, the country admitted over three million refugees during the Cold War. This dramatic reversal gave rise to intense political and cultural battles, pitting refugee advocates against determined opponents who at times successfully slowed admissions. The first comprehensive historical exploration of American refugee affairs from the midcentury to the present, Americans at the Gate explores the reasons behind the remarkable changes to American refugee policy, laws, and programs. Carl Bon Tempo looks at the Hungarian, Cuban, and Indochinese refugee crises, and he examines major pieces of legislation, including the Refugee Relief Act and the 1980 Refugee Act. He argues that the American commitment to refugees in the post-1945 era occurred not just because of foreign policy imperatives during the Cold War, but also because of particular domestic developments within the United States such as the Red Scare, the Civil Rights Movement, the rise of the Right, and partisan electoral politics. Using a wide variety of sources and documents, Americans at the Gate considers policy and law developments in connection with the organization and administration of refugee programs.

Crashing the Gate

How American Politics Is about to Change
Author: Jerome Armstrong,Markos Moulitsas Zúniga
Publisher: Pluto Press Australia
ISBN: 9781864033212
Category: Blogs
Page: 196
View: 7412

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Details how the Bush administration is stuffing up America, and exposes the real tensions in the coalition of the religious right or old school libertarians, who make up the republican activist support base.

Closing the Gate

Race, Politics, and the Chinese Exclusion Act
Author: Andrew Gyory
Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
ISBN: 080786675X
Category: History
Page: 368
View: 1042

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The Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, which barred practically all Chinese from American shores for ten years, was the first federal law that banned a group of immigrants solely on the basis of race or nationality. By changing America's traditional policy of open immigration, this landmark legislation set a precedent for future restrictions against Asian immigrants in the early 1900s and against Europeans in the 1920s. Tracing the origins of the Chinese Exclusion Act, Andrew Gyory presents a bold new interpretation of American politics during Reconstruction and the Gilded Age. Rather than directly confront such divisive problems as class conflict, economic depression, and rising unemployment, he contends, politicians sought a safe, nonideological solution to the nation's industrial crisis--and latched onto Chinese exclusion. Ignoring workers' demands for an end simply to imported contract labor, they claimed instead that working people would be better off if there were no Chinese immigrants. By playing the race card, Gyory argues, national politicians--not California, not organized labor, and not a general racist atmosphere--provided the motive force behind the era's most racist legislation.

The Gates


Author: Iain Rob Wright
Publisher: Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
ISBN: 9781518801846
Category: End of the world
Page: 337
View: 521

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"Guy Granger is a Coast Guard captain in search of his kids. Mina Magar is a photojournalist taking pictures of horror she had never imagined. Rick Bastion is a fading popstar with his head in a bottle and little care about survival. Tony Cross is stuck on the Iraq-Syria Border, but fighting insurgents is no longer a priority. There's much worse threat to world peace now. Follow them all as they try to stay alive" -- back cover.

The Gate to Women's Country


Author: Sheri S. Tepper
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 0575116226
Category: Fiction
Page: 278
View: 3125

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The Gate to Women's Country tells of a society that exists three hundred years after our own has nearly destroyed itself. Now, male warriors are separated from women at an early age and live in garrisons plotting futilely for the battles which must never be fought again. Inside the women's towns, education, arts and science flourish. But for some like Stavia, there is more to see. Her sojourn with the man she is forbidden to love brings into sharp focus the contradictions that define their lives. And when tragedy strikes, Stavia is faced with a decision she never thought she would make - a decision that could forever change their world ... The Gate to Women's Country is a novel that rivals Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid's Tale in scope, impact, and the sheer power of its storytelling.

Strangers at the Gate

Social Disorder in South China, 1839-1861
Author: Frederic E. Wakeman
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 9780520212398
Category: History
Page: 276
View: 7101

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First published in 1966, and now available once more, this pioneering work examines the relationship between the Chinese civil and military authorities and the British trading community in Guangdong province on the eve of the Taiping Rebellion--one of the most calamitous events in Chinese history. The book explores the various factors that led to the progression of rebellion and the inevitability of revolution.

The Gates

A Samuel Johnson Tale
Author: John Connolly
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 9781439173053
Category: Fiction
Page: 304
View: 4973

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Young Samuel Johnson and his dachshund, Boswell, are trying to show initiative by trick-or-treating a full three days before Halloween, which is how they come to witness strange goings-on at 666 Crowley Road. The Abernathys don't mean any harm by their flirtation with the underworld, but when they unknowingly call forth Satan himself, they create a gap in the universe, a gap through which a pair of enormous gates is visible. The gates to Hell. And there are some pretty terrifying beings just itching to get out.... Can one small boy defeat evil? Can he harness the power of science, faith, and love to save the world as we know it? Bursting with imagination and impossible to put down, The Gates is about the pull between good and evil, physics and fantasy. It is about a quirky and eccentric boy, who is impossible not to love, and the unlikely cast of characters who give him the strength to stand up to a demonic power. In this wonderfully strange and brilliant novel, John Connolly manages to re-create the magical and scary world of childhood that we've all left behind but so love to visit. And for those of you who thought you knew everything you could about particle physics and the universe, think again. This novel makes anything seem possible.

Citizens at the Gates

Twitter, Networked Publics, and the Transformation of American Journalism
Author: Stephen R. Barnard
Publisher: Springer
ISBN: 3319904469
Category: Social Science
Page: 215
View: 2933

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Drawing insights from nearly a decade of mixed-method research, Stephen R. Barnard analyzes Twitter’s role in the transformation of American journalism. As the work of media professionals grows increasingly hybrid, Twitter has become an essential space where information is shared, reporting methods tested, and power contested. In addition to spelling opportunity for citizen media activism, the normalization of digital communication adds new channels of influence for traditional thought leaders, posing notable challenges for the future of journalism and democracy. In his analyses of Twitter practices around newsworthy events—including the Boston Marathon bombing, protests in Ferguson, Missouri, and the election of Donald Trump—Barnard brings together conceptual and theoretical lenses from multiple academic disciplines, bridging sociology, journalism, communication, media studies, science and technology studies, and political science.

The Wall and the Gate

Israel, Palestine, and the Legal Battle for Human Rights
Author: Michael Sfard
Publisher: Metropolitan Books
ISBN: 1250122708
Category: History
Page: 528
View: 518

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From renowned human rights lawyer Michael Sfard, an unprecedented exploration of the struggle for human rights in Israel's courts A farmer from a village in the occupied West Bank, cut off from his olive groves by the construction of Israel’s controversial separation wall, asked Israeli human rights lawyer Michael Sfard to petition the courts to allow a gate to be built in the wall. While the gate would provide immediate relief for the farmer, would it not also confer legitimacy on the wall and on the court that deems it legal? The defense of human rights is often marked by such ethical dilemmas, which are especially acute in Israel, where lawyers have for decades sought redress for the abuse of Palestinian rights in the country’s High Court—that is, in the court of the abuser. In The Wall and the Gate, Michael Sfard chronicles this struggle—a story that has never before been fully told— and in the process engages the core principles of human rights legal ethics. Sfard recounts the unfolding of key cases and issues, ranging from confiscation of land, deportations, the creation of settlements, punitive home demolitions, torture, and targeted killings—all actions considered violations of international law. In the process, he lays bare the reality of the occupation and the lives of the people who must contend with that reality. He also exposes the surreal legal structures that have been erected to put a stamp of lawfulness on an extensive program of dispossession. Finally, he weighs the success of the legal effort, reaching conclusions that are no less paradoxical than the fight itself. Writing with emotional force, vivid storytelling, and penetrating analysis, Michael Sfard offers a radically new perspective on a much-covered conflict and a subtle, painful reckoning with the moral ambiguities inherent in the pursuit of justice. The Wall and the Gate is a signal contribution to everyone concerned with the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and human rights everywhere.

I Am The Gate


Author: Osho
Publisher: Diamond Pocket Books (P) Ltd.
ISBN: 9788171826063
Category: Spiritual life
Page: 248
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Behind the Gate

Inventing Students in Beijing
Author: Fabio Lanza
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231152388
Category: Education
Page: 299
View: 2352

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On May 4, 1919, thousands of students protested the Versailles treaty in Beijing. Seventy years later, another generation demonstrated in Tiananmen Square. Climbing the Monument of the People's Heroes, these protestors stood against a relief of their predecessors, merging with their own mythology while consciously deploying their activism. Through an investigation of twentieth-century Chinese student protest, Fabio Lanza considers the marriage of the cultural and the political, the intellectual and the quotidian, that occurred during the May Fourth movement, along with its rearticulation in subsequent protest. He ultimately explores the political category of the "student" and its making in the twentieth century. Lanza returns to the May Fourth period (1917-1923) and the rise of student activism in and around Beijing University. He revisits reform in pedagogical and learning routines, changes in daily campus life, the fluid relationship between the city and its residents, and the actions of allegedly cultural student organizations. Through a careful analysis of everyday life and urban space, Lanza radically reconceptualizes the emergence of political subjectivities (categories such as "worker," "activist," and "student") and how they anchor and inform political action. He accounts for the elements that drew students to Tiananmen and the formation of the student as an enduring political category. His research underscores how, during a time of crisis, the lived realities of university and student became unsettled in Beijing, and how political militancy in China arose only when the boundaries of identification were challenged.

The Enemy at the Gate

Habsburgs, Ottomans and the Battle for Europe
Author: Andrew Wheatcroft
Publisher: Random House
ISBN: 1409086828
Category: History
Page: 384
View: 8729

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In 1683, two empires - the Ottoman, based in Constantinople, and the Habsburg dynasty in Vienna - came face to face in the culmination of a 250-year power struggle: the Great Siege of Vienna. Within the city walls the choice of resistance over surrender to the largest army ever assembled by the Turks created an all-or-nothing scenario: every last survivor would be enslaved or ruthlessly slaughtered. The Turks had set their sights on taking Vienna, the city they had long called 'The Golden Apple' since their first siege of the city in 1529. Both sides remained resolute, sustained by hatred of their age-old enemy, certain that their victory would be won by the grace of God. Eastern invaders had always threatened the West: Huns, Mongols, Goths, Visigoths, Vandals and many others. The Western fears of the East were vivid and powerful and, in their new eyes, the Turks always appeared the sole aggressors. Andrew Wheatcroft's extraordinary book shows that this belief is a grievous oversimplification: during the 400 year struggle for domination, the West took the offensive just as often as the East. As modern Turkey seeks to re-orient its relationship with Europe, a new generation of politicians is exploiting the residual fears and tensions between East and West to hamper this change. The Enemy at the Gate provides a timely and masterful account of this most complex and epic of conflicts.

The Gate to Xoran


Author: Hal K. Wells
Publisher: eStar Books
ISBN: 1612100074
Category: Fiction
Page: N.A
View: 7875

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He sat in a small half-darkened booth well over in the corner-the man with the strangely glowing blue-green eyes.The booth was one of a score that circled the walls of the "Maori Hut," a popular night club in the San Fernando Valley some five miles over the hills from Hollywood.It was nearly midnight. Half a dozen couples danced lazily in the central dancing space. Other couples remained t te- -t te in the secluded booths.In the entire room only two men were dining alone. One was the slender gray-haired little man with the weirdly glowing eyes. The other was Blair Gordon, a highly successful young attorney of Los Angeles. Both men had the unmistakable air of waiting for someone.Blair Gordon's college days were not so far distant that he had yet lost any of the splendid physique that had made him an All-American tackle. In any physical combat with the slight gray-haired stranger, Gordon knew that he should be able to break the other in two with one hand.Yet, as he studied the stranger from behind the potted palms that screened his own booth. Gordon was amazed to find himself slowly being overcome by an emotion of dread so intense that it verged upon sheer fear. There was something indescribably alien and utterly sinister in that dimly seen figure in the corner booth.The faint eerie light that glowed in the stranger's deep-set eyes was not the lambent flame seen in the chatoyant orbs of some night-prowling jungle beast. Rather was it the blue-green glow of phosphorescent witch-light that flickers and dances in the night mists above steaming tropical swamps.The stranger's face was as classically perfect in its rugged outline as that of a Roman war-god, yet those perfect features seemed utterly lifeless. In the twenty minutes that he had been intently watching the stranger, Gordon would have sworn that the other's face had not moved by so much as the twitch of an eye-lash.****Then a new couple entered the Maori Hut, and Gordon promptly forgot all thought of the puzzlingly alien figure in the corner. The new arrivals were a vibrantly beautiful blond girl and a plump, sallow-faced man in the early forties. The girl was Leah Keith, Hollywood's latest screen sensation. The man was Dave Redding, her director.A waiter seated Leah and her escort in a booth directly across the room from that of Gordon. It was a maneuver for which Gordon had tipped lavishly when he first came to the Hut.A week ago Leah Keith's engagement to Blair Gordon had been abruptly ended by a trivial little quarrel that two volatile temperaments had fanned into flames which apparently made reconciliation impossible. A miserably lonely week had finally ended in Gordon's present trip to the Maori Hut. He knew that Leah often came there, and he had an overwhelming longing to at least see her again, even though his pride forced him to remain unseen.Now, as he stared glumly at Leah through the palms that effectively screened his own booth, Gordon heartily regretted that he had ever come. The sight of Leah's clear fresh beauty merely made him realize what a fool he had been to let that ridiculous little quarrel come between them.Then, with a sudden tingling thrill, Gordon realized that he was not the only one in the room who was interested in Leah and her escort.Over in the half-darkened corner booth the eerie stranger was staring at the girl with an intentness that made his weird eyes glow like miniature pools of shimmering blue-green fire. Again Gordon felt that vague impression of dread, as though he were in the presence of something utterly alien to all human experience.

The Horses at the Gate


Author: Mary Mackey
Publisher: iUniverse
ISBN: 0595311245
Category: Fiction
Page: 321
View: 3806

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A war between a matriarchy and a patriarchy. The heroine is Marrah, queen of the matriarchy, and she leads her people in battle against the nomadic tribes of the patriarchy. The time is 5th Century BC, the setting the steppes of the Ukraine, and the novel describes the different lifestyles of societies ruled by men and by women. By the author of The Year of the Horses.