The Frontier of Loyalty

Political Exiles in the Age of the Nation-State
Author: Yossi Shain
Publisher: University of Michigan Press
ISBN: 9780472026128
Category: Political Science
Page: 248
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Paperback edition of the pathbreaking book on the role of exiles in international relations, with a new foreword (including material on the war in Iraq). "In a world increasingly shaped by transnational organizations and processes, this is a timely and welcome subject, and Yossi Shain provides an informative overview." --Rogers Brubaker, Harvard University, in The American Journal of Sociology "Engrossing." --International Affairs "Mr. Shain is at his best stitching together information that hitherto had not been systematically related to analytical themes. . . . A major contribution to understanding the patterns and complexities of the politics of those at home abroad." --International Migration Review "The Frontier of Loyalty is the first comprehensive and theoretically oriented study of exile politics; the types of exile activity; the relation to both the home and host governments; and the difficulties and ambiguities of exile politics, particularly the struggle for legitimacy as spokesman for the opposition at home and for recognition from the outside." --- Juan J. Linz, Yale University "An ingenious and sensitive analysis of political exiles as 'voice from without,' which contributes to our understanding of the transnational character of contemporary politics." --- Aristide R. Zolberg, New School for Social Research "Drawing upon a wide literature on contemporary political exiles, Yossi Shain presents a sophisticated, learned and sensible survey of their place in political life today. More important, his meditation on the role of exiles proves such essential political categories as legitimacy, national loyalty, and opposition in the modern state. One test of any work of scholarship is whether it enhances our understanding of concepts that we have previously taken for granted. By this measure, Shain's book passes with flying colors." --- Michael R. Marrus, University of Toronto

Loyalty on the Frontier, Or, Sketches of Union Men of the South-west

With Incidents and Adventures in Rebellion on the Border
Author: Albert Webb Bishop,Kim Allen Scott
Publisher: University of Arkansas Press
ISBN: 9781557287571
Category: History
Page: 228
View: 5682

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First published in 1863, this book has the immediacy, passion, and intimacy of its wartime context. It tells the remarkable story of Albert Webb Bishop, a New York lawyer turned Union soldier, who in 1862 accepted a commission as lieutenant colonel in a regiment of Ozark mountaineers. While maintaining Union control of northwest Arkansas, he collected stories of the social coercion, political secession, and brutal terrorism that scarred the region. His larger goal, however, was to popularize and inspire sympathy for the South’s Unionists and to chronicle the triumph of Unionism in a Confederate state. His account points to the complex and divisive nature of Confederate society and in doing so provides a perspective that has long been absent from discussions of the Civil War.

Land, Power, and Economics on the Frontier of Upper Canada


Author: John Clarke
Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
ISBN: 9780773521940
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 747
View: 2112

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In this thorough study of an important period, Upper Canadian attitudes to land and society are shown to have been built on contemporary visions of the cosmos. John Clarke examines the actions of individuals from the perspective of the political culture and its manifestations, doing so within the constraints of geography and the cultural baggage of the settlers. Placing human action in the context of economics and laissez-faire capitalism, Clarke shows how almost unbridled acquisitiveness, and its concomitant land speculation, could promote or hinder development. The prevailing ideology in Ontario at the time was a conservative culture that rejected everything American and attempted to preserve the best of the British world in the new Eden. Those building the state believed that a social and political hierarchy composed of those possessing a "natural virtue" would serve society best. In consequence, a few individuals at the top of the hierarchy, through their access to power, came to control the bulk of the land, the basis of the economy. At the other end of the spectrum from the elite were those transforming the land and themselves through their own labour. How did the physical environment and government land policy affect the pattern of settlement and the choice of land for a viable farm? What was the price of land, and how common was credit? Did the presence of reserved lands hinder or promote development? How extensive was land speculation and how did it operate? Clark brings these issues and more to the forefront, integrating concepts and substantive issues through a problem-oriented approach. Blending qualitative and quantitative approaches, he weaves together surveyors' records, personal and government correspondence, assessment rolls, and land records to measure the pulse of this pre-industrial society.

Loyalty on the Frontier

Or, Sketches of Union Men of the South-west
Author: Albert Webb Bishop
Publisher: University of Arkansas Press
ISBN: N.A
Category: Arkansas
Page: 228
View: 7610

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The Frontier People of Roman Britain


Author: Peter Salway
Publisher: CUP Archive
ISBN: 9780521061872
Category: History
Page: 286
View: 2914

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The Frontier area of northern England is the most important and reliable source for archaeologists in existence. The perpetuation of the Roman imperial ideal, the survival of classical art and literature, and the spread of the Christian faith depended on the strength of the Empire's frontier and the people who lived there. In Britain these peoples represent nearly 400 years of a cosmopolitan society with the basic elements of a true civilisation. They had greater freedom and security and were more literate and prosperous than at any previous time or for many centuries after. Dr Salway's study of this area is a detailed investigation of the Romanised part of the civilian population to be made. He describes the people themselves and every aspect of their background and way of life, their legal status and their administrative system. He then examines each of the sites individually, making special use of aerial photographs.

Flight of the Eagle: The Frontier


Author: Peter Watt
Publisher: Pan Australia
ISBN: 1742629229
Category: Fiction
Page: 688
View: 3343

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The third novel in the compelling Duffy and Macintosh series. "The home grown version of Wilbur Smith" The Sunday Age A deadly family curse holds two families in its powerful grip. Captain Patrick Duffy's passions are inflamed by the mysterious Irishwoman Catherine Fitzgerald, further pitting him against his father, Michael Duffy, and his adoring but scheming grandmother, Lady Enid Macintosh. On the rugged Queensland frontier, Native Mounted Police trooper Peter Duffy is torn between his loyal bond with Gordon James, the love of his sister, Sarah, and the blood of his mother's people, the Nerambura tribe. Two men, the women who love them and a dreadful curse that still inextricably links the lives of the Macintoshes and the Duffys culminate in a stunning addition to the series featuring Cry of the Curlew and Shadow of the Osprey. PRAISE FOR THE SERIES "A rousing and revealing yarn" Weekend Australian "the historical detail brings the ... 19th century to rip-roaring life" The Australian "Watt's fans love his work for its history, adventure and storytelling" Brisbane News

Cry of the Curlew: The Frontier


Author: Peter Watt
Publisher: Pan Australia
ISBN: 1742629288
Category: Fiction
Page: 720
View: 5910

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The first bestselling novel in the compelling Duffy and Macintosh series, depicting our turbulent history as never before. "The home grown version of Wilbur Smith" The Sunday Age A stark and vivid novel of Australia's brutal past. An epic tale of two families, the Macintoshes and the Duffys, who are locked in a deadly battle from the moment squatter Donald Macintosh commits an act of barbarity on his Queensland property. Their paths cross in love, death and revenge as both families fight to tame the wild frontier of Australia's north country. PRAISE FOR THE SERIES "A rousing and revealing yarn" Weekend Australian "the historical detail brings the ... 19th century to rip-roaring life" The Australian "Watt's fans love his work for its history, adventure and storytelling" Brisbane News

The Frontier Within

Essays by Abe Kobo
Author: Kōbō Abe
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231535090
Category: Literary Collections
Page: 224
View: 8192

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Abe Kobo (1924–1993) was one of Japan's greatest postwar writers, widely recognized for his imaginative science fiction and plays of the absurd. However, he also wrote theoretical criticism for which he is lesser known, merging literary, historical, and philosophical perspectives into keen reflections on the nature of creativity, the evolution of the human species, and an impressive range of other subjects. Abe Kobo tackled contemporary social issues and literary theory with the depth and facility of a visionary thinker. Featuring twelve essays from his prolific career—including "Poetry and Poets (Consciousness and the Unconscious)," written in 1944, and "The Frontier Within, Part II," written in 1969—this anthology introduces English-speaking readers to Abe Kobo as critic and intellectual for the first time. Demonstrating the importance of his theoretical work to a broader understanding of his fiction—and a richer portrait of Japan's postwar imagination—Richard F. Calichman provides an incisive introduction to Abe Kobo's achievements and situates his essays historically and intellectually.

Shadow of the Osprey: The Frontier


Author: Peter Watt
Publisher: Pan Australia
ISBN: 1742629253
Category: Fiction
Page: 640
View: 3847

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The second bestselling novel in the compelling Duffy and Macintosh series, following on from Cry of the Curlew. "The home grown version of Wilbur Smith" The Sunday Age A riveting tale of love, death and revenge. Soldier of fortune Michael Duffy returns to colonial Sydney on a covert mission and with old scores to settle, still enraged by a bitter feud between his family and the ruthless Macintoshes. The Palmer River gold rush lures American prospector Luke Tracy back to Australia's rugged north country in his elusive search for riches and the great passion of his life, Kate O'Keefe. From the boardrooms and backstreets of Sydney to the hazardous waters of the Coral Sea, the sequel to Cry of Curlew confirms the exceptional talent of master storyteller Peter Watt. PRAISE FOR THE SERIES "A rousing and revealing yarn" Weekend Australian "the historical detail brings the ... 19th century to rip-roaring life" The Australian "Watt's fans love his work for its history, adventure and storytelling" Brisbane News

Unbounded Loyalty

Frontier Crossings in Liao China
Author: Naomi Standen
Publisher: University of Hawaii Press
ISBN: 0824829832
Category: History
Page: 279
View: 4140

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Unbounded Loyalty investigates how frontiers worked before the modern nation-state was invented. The perspective is that of the people in the borderlands who shifted their allegiance from the post-Tang regimes in North China to the new Liao empire (907 1125). Naomi Standen offers new ways of thinking about borders, loyalty, and identity in premodern China. She takes as her starting point the recognition that, at the time, China did not exist as a coherent entity, neither politically nor geographically, neither ethnically nor ideologically. Political borders were not the fixed geographical divisions of the modern world, but a function of relationships between leaders and followers. When local leaders changed allegiance, the borderline moved with them. Cultural identity did not determine people s actions: Ethnicity did not exist. In this context, she argues, collaboration, resistance, and accommodation were not meaningful concepts, and tenth-century understandings of loyalty were broad and various. Unbounded Loyalty sheds fresh light on the Tang-Song transition by focusing on the much-neglected tenth century and by treating the Liao as the preeminent Tang successor state. It fills several important gaps in scholarship on premodern China as well as uncovering new questions regarding the early modern period. It will be regarded as critically important to all scholars of the Tang, Liao, Five Dynasties, and Song periods and will be read widely by those working on Chinese history from the Han to the Qing. "

The Frontier State, 1818-1848


Author: Theodore Calvin Pease
Publisher: University of Illinois Press
ISBN: 9780252013386
Category: Illinois
Page: 475
View: 3554

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State history at its best, the book still enlightens students of the early nineteenth century, not only about Illinois's experience during those dynamic years but about that of America as well. The Frontier State is the story of America's, as it is of Illinois's, coming of age.

To Chase the Storm: The Frontier


Author: Peter Watt
Publisher: Pan Australia
ISBN: 9781742624037
Category: Fiction
Page: 544
View: 1328

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The fourth novel in the compelling Duffy and Macintosh series. "The home grown version of Wilbur Smith" The Sunday Age When Major Patrick Duffy's beautiful wife Catherine leaves him for another, he is propelled out of the Sydney Macintosh home and into yet another bloody war. However the battlefields of Africa, fighting the Boers, bring him in contact with one he thought long dead and lost to him. Back in Australia, the mysterious Michael O'Flynn mentors Patrick's youngest son, Alex, and takes him on a journey to the Queensland property, Glen View. But will the terrible curse that has inextricably linked the Duffys and Macintoshes for generations ensure that no true happiness can ever come to them? Through the dawn of a new century in a now federated nation, To Chase the Storm charts an explosive tale of love and loss, from South Africa to Palestine, from Townsville to the green hills of Ireland. PRAISE FOR THE SERIES "A rousing and revealing yarn" Weekend Australian "the historical detail brings the ... 19th century to rip-roaring life" The Australian "Watt's fans love his work for its history, adventure and storytelling" Brisbane News

The Rebel Den of Nung Tr Cao

Loyalty and Identity along the Sino-Vietnamese Frontier
Author: James A. Anderson
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295800771
Category: History
Page: 296
View: 7805

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The Rebel Den of Nung Tri Cao examines the rebellion of the eleventh-century Tai chieftain Nung Tri Cao (ca. 1025-1055), whose struggle for independence along Vietnam's mountainous northern frontier was a pivotal event in Sino-Vietnamese relations. Tri Cao's revolt occurred during Vietnam's earliest years of independence from China and would prove to be a vital test of the Vietnamese court's ability to confront local political challenges and maintain harmony with its powerful northern neighbor. Tri Cao established his first kingdom in 1042, at the age of seventeen, but was captured by Vietnamese troops. After his release in 1048, he announced the founding of a second kingdom, but an attack by Vietnamese forces drove him to flee into Chinese territory. Tri Cao made his final attempt in 1052, proclaiming a new kingdom and leading thousands of his subjects in a revolt that swept across the South China coast. But within a year, Chinese imperial troops had forced him to flee to the nearest independent kingdom. Official Chinese and Vietnamese accounts of the rebel leader's end vary: according to the Chinese, the ruler of the independent kingdom had Tri Cao executed, but in popular accounts, Tri Cao was granted safe passage into northern Thailand, where his descendants are said to flourish today. Scholar James Anderson places Tri Cao in context by exploring the Sino-Vietnamese tributary relationship and the conflicts that engaged both the Song and Vietnamese courts. The Rebel Den of Nung Tri Cao reconstructs the series of negotiations that took place between border communities and representatives of the imperial courts, examining the ways in which Tai and other ethnic groups deftly navigated the unstable political situation that followed the demise of China's cosmopolitan Tang dynasty. Though his rebellion was ill-fated, Tri Cao is, almost a thousand years later, still worshipped in temples along the Sino-Vietnamese border, and his memory provides a point of unity for people who have become separated by modern political boundaries.

Test of Loyalty


Author: Peter Schrag
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0671220217
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 416
View: 5998

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Contains primary source material.

The Reign of Richard Lionheart

Ruler of The Angevin Empire, 1189-1199
Author: Ralph V Turner,Richard Heiser
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317890418
Category: History
Page: 304
View: 4104

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First published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The Gods of Prophetstown

The Battle of Tippecanoe and the Holy War for the American Frontier
Author: Adam Jortner
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019991270X
Category: History
Page: 320
View: 8814

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It began with an eclipse. In 1806, the Shawnee leader Tenskwatawa ("The Open Door") declared himself to be in direct contact with the Master of Life, and therefore, the supreme religious authority for all Native Americans. Those who disbelieved him, he warned, "would see darkness come over the sun." William Henry Harrison, governor of the Indiana Territory and future American president, scoffed at Tenskwatawa. If he was truly a prophet, Harrison taunted, let him perform a miracle. And Tenskwatawa did just that, making the sun go dark at midday. In The Gods of Prophetstown, Adam Jortner provides a gripping account of the conflict between Tenskwatawa and Harrison, who finally collided in 1811 at a place called Tippecanoe. Though largely forgotten today, their rivalry determined the future of westward expansion and shaped the War of 1812. Jortner weaves together dual biographies of the opposing leaders. In the five years between the eclipse and the battle, Tenskwatawa used his spiritual leadership to forge a political pseudo-state with his brother Tecumseh. Harrison, meanwhile, built a power base in Indiana, rigging elections and maneuvering for higher position. Rejecting received wisdom, Jortner sees nothing as preordained-Native Americans were not inexorably falling toward dispossession and destruction. Deeply rooting his account in a generation of scholarship that has revolutionized Indian history, Jortner places the religious dimension of the struggle at the fore, recreating the spiritual landscapes trod by each side. The climactic battle, he writes, was as much a clash of gods as of men. Written with profound insight and narrative verve, The Gods of Prophetstown recaptures a forgotten turning point in American history in time for the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Tippecanoe.