The Fall of a Sparrow

The Life and Times of Abba Kovner
Author: Dina Porat
Publisher: Stanford University Press
ISBN: 9780804772525
Category: History
Page: 440
View: 1049

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The Fall of a Sparrow is the only full biography in English of the partisan, poet, and patriot Abba Kovner (1918–1987). An unsung and largely unknown hero of the Second World War and Israel's War of Independence, Kovner was born in Vilna, "the Jerusalem of Lithuania." Long before the rest of the world suspected, he was the first person to state that Hitler was planning to kill the Jews of Europe. Kovner and other defenders of the Vilna ghetto, only hours before its destruction, escaped to the forest to join the partisans fighting the Nazis. Returning after the Liberation to find Vilna empty of Jews, he immigrated to Israel, where he devised a fruitless plot to take revenge on the Germans. He then joined the Israeli army and served as the Givati Brigade's Information Officer, writing "Battle Notes," newsletters that inspired the troops defending Tel Aviv. After the war, Kovner settled on a kibbutz and dedicated his life to working the land, writing poetry, and raising a family. He was also the moving force behind such projects as the Diaspora Museum and the Institute for the Translation of Hebrew Literature. The Fall of a Sparrow is based on countless interviews with people who knew Kovner, and letters and archival material that have never been translated before.

Scrolls of Testimony


Author: Abba Kovner,Edward A. Levenston
Publisher: Jewish Publication Society of America
ISBN: N.A
Category: Fiction
Page: 191
View: 5552

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"Scrolls of Testimony is powerful, dramatic and compelling - the testimony of the author woven with others' eyewitness accounts, diary entries, poems, and even last wills and testaments. Many of these were carefully recorded and hidden during the war at great personal risk to the writers, who desperately wanted to record the unfathomable events before them. Regarded by many as one of the great masterpieces of Holocaust literature, Scrolls of Testimony is indeed a modern Jewish classic. Kovner worked on the book until his death, and it remains his final tribute to the courage and dignity of the victims and a fulfillment of his promise to bring their testimony to future generations."--BOOK JACKET.

Israeli Holocaust Research

Birth and Evolution
Author: Boaz Cohen
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 0415601053
Category: History
Page: 346
View: 6026

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An exploration of the development of Holocaust research in Israel, this book ranges from the consolidation of Holocaust research as an academic subject in the late 1940s to the establishment of Yad Vashem and beyond. Research on the story of historiography is often a work on books, on the "final products" that fill academic bookshelves yet, in Israeli Holocaust Research, Boaz Cohen illustrates that the evolution of holocaust research in Israel has a more human element to it. Drawing on knowledge gained through seven years of work in ten major archives in Israel, the author reveals a previously unseen picture of the development of Israeli Holocaust research "from below," and of the social and cultural forces influencing its character. In doing so, a new facet to the picture emerges, of the story beyond the archive and the people who see Holocaust research as their mission and responsibility. This book will be a fascinating addition to the study of Holocaust research and will be of particular interest to students of history, historiography and Jewish studies

The Emergence of Jewish Ghettos during the Holocaust


Author: Dan Michman
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139494708
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 8413

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This book is a linguistic-cultural study of the emergence of the Jewish ghettos during the Holocaust. It traces the origins and uses of the term 'ghetto' in European discourse from the sixteenth century to the Nazi regime. It examines with a magnifying glass both the actual establishment of and the discourse of the Nazis and their allies on ghettos from 1939 to 1944. With conclusions that oppose all existing explanations and cursory examinations of the ghetto, the book impacts overall understanding of the anti-Jewish policies of Nazi Germany.

The Fall of a Sparrow

A Novel
Author: Robert Hellenga
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 0684850273
Category: Fiction
Page: 464
View: 9847

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Tells the story of a midwestern professor who, his career ruined by an affair with a student, travels to Bologna to attend a trial of terrorists who had killed his eldest daughter

The Lost Library

The Legacy of Vilna's Strashun Library in the Aftermath of the Holocaust
Author: Dan Rabinowitz
Publisher: Brandeis University Press
ISBN: 1512603104
Category: History
Page: 296
View: 4554

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The Strashun Library was among the most important Jewish public institutions in Vilna, and indeed in Eastern Europe, prior to its destruction during World War II. Mattityahu Strashun, descended from a long and distinguished line of rabbis, bequeathed his extensive personal library of 5,753 volumes to the Vilna Jewish community on his death in 1885, with instructions that it remain open to all. In the summer of 1941, the Nazis came to Vilna, plundered the library, and shipped many of its books to Germany for deposition at a future Institute for Research into the Jewish Question. When the war ended, the recovery effort began. Against all odds, a number of the greatest treasures of the library could be traced. However, owing to its diverse holdings and its many prewar patrons, a custody battle erupted over the remaining holdings. Who should be heir to the Strashun Library? This book tells the story of the Strashun Library from its creation through the contentious battle for ownership following the war until present day. Pursuant to a settlement in 1958, the remnants of the greatest prewar library in Europe were split between two major institutions: the secular YIVO in the United States and the rabbinic library of Hechal Shlomo in Israel, a compromise that struck at the heart of the library's original unifying mission.

My Little Sister and Selected Poems, 1965-1985


Author: Abba Kovner
Publisher: Oberlin College Press
ISBN: N.A
Category: Poetry
Page: 159
View: 9973

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The title sequence is justly famous as one of the major pieces of literature to come out of the Holocaust. It appears here with a new selection of Abba Kovner's work spanning his forty-plus years as one of Israel's leading poets. The noted American-Israeli poet Shirley Kaufman had the privilege of working directly with Kovner on these versions in the years before his death.

Legislating for Equality

A Multinational Collection of Non-Discrimination Norms. Volume I: Europe
Author: Talia Naamat,Dina Porat,Nina Osin
Publisher: Martinus Nijhoff Publishers
ISBN: 9004226125
Category: Law
Page: 552
View: 7889

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This publication consists of a comprehensive collection of all UN member states' legislation on non-discrimination, protection of minorities, prohibition of hate-crimes and hate speech. The book, divided into four volumes, provides a legal model for combating discrimination through national legislation.

The Dutch Wife


Author: Ellen Keith
Publisher: Harlequin
ISBN: 1488098662
Category: Fiction
Page: N.A
View: 2729

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A sweeping story of survival during World War II Amsterdam, May 1943. As the tulips bloom and the Nazis tighten their grip across the city, the last signs of Dutch resistance are being swept away. Marijke de Graaf and her husband are arrested and deported to different concentration camps in Germany. Marijke is given a terrible choice: to suffer a slow death in the labor camp or—for a chance at survival—to join the camp brothel. On the other side of the barbed wire, SS officer Karl MŸller arrives at the camp hoping to live up to his father’s expectations of wartime glory. When he encounters the newly arrived Marijke, this meeting changes their lives forever. Woven into the narrative across space and time is Luciano Wagner’s ordeal in 1977 Buenos Aires, during the heat of the Argentine Dirty War. In his struggle to endure military captivity, he searches for ways to resist from a prison cell he may never leave. From the Netherlands to Germany to Argentina, The Dutch Wife braids together the stories of three individuals who share a dark secret and are entangled in two of the most oppressive reigns of terror in modern history. This is a novel about the blurred lines between love and lust, abuse and resistance, and right and wrong, as well as the capacity for ordinary people to persevere and do the unthinkable in extraordinary circumstances.

The Sparrow

A Novel
Author: Mary Doria Russell
Publisher: Ballantine Books
ISBN: 9780345510884
Category: Fiction
Page: 448
View: 1985

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A visionary work that combines speculative fiction with deep philosophical inquiry, The Sparrow tells the story of a charismatic Jesuit priest and linguist, Emilio Sandoz, who leads a scientific mission entrusted with a profound task: to make first contact with intelligent extraterrestrial life. The mission begins in faith, hope, and beauty, but a series of small misunderstandings brings it to a catastrophic end. Praise for The Sparrow “A startling, engrossing, and moral work of fiction.”—The New York Times Book Review “Important novels leave deep cracks in our beliefs, our prejudices, and our blinders. The Sparrow is one of them.”—Entertainment Weekly “Powerful . . . The Sparrow tackles a difficult subject with grace and intelligence.”—San Francisco Chronicle “Provocative, challenging . . . recalls both Arthur C. Clarke and H. G. Wells, with a dash of Ray Bradbury for good measure.”—The Dallas Morning News “[Mary Doria] Russell shows herself to be a skillful storyteller who subtly and expertly builds suspense.”—USA Today From the Trade Paperback edition.

A Million Years in a Day

A Curious History of Everyday Life from the Stone Age to the Phone Age
Author: Greg Jenner
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 125008945X
Category: History
Page: 368
View: 1291

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Who invented beds? When did we start cleaning our teeth? How old are wine and beer? Which came first: the toilet seat or toilet paper? What was the first clock? Every day, from the moment our alarm clock wakes us in the morning until our head hits our pillow at night, we all take part in rituals that are millennia old. Structured around one ordinary day, A Million Years in a Day reveals the astonishing origins and development of the daily practices we take for granted. In this gloriously entertaining romp through human history, Greg Jenner explores the gradual—and often unexpected—evolution of our daily routines. This is not a story of wars, politics, or great events. Instead, Jenner has scoured Roman rubbish bins, Egyptian tombs, and Victorian sewers to bring us the most intriguing, surprising, and sometimes downright silly historical nuggets from our past. Drawn from across the world, spanning a million years of humanity, this book is a smorgasbord of historical delights. It is a history of all those things you always wondered about—and many you have never considered. It is the story of your life, one million years in the making.

Gates of Fire


Author: Steven Pressfield
Publisher: Bantam
ISBN: 9780553904055
Category: Fiction
Page: 400
View: 3304

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BONUS: This edition contains an excerpt from Steven Pressfield's The Profession. The national bestseller! At Thermopylae, a rocky mountain pass in northern Greece, the feared and admired Spartan soldiers stood three hundred strong. Theirs was a suicide mission, to hold the pass against the invading millions of the mighty Persian army. Day after bloody day they withstood the terrible onslaught, buying time for the Greeks to rally their forces. Born into a cult of spiritual courage, physical endurance, and unmatched battle skill, the Spartans would be remembered for the greatest military stand in history--one that would not end until the rocks were awash with blood, leaving only one gravely injured Spartan squire to tell the tale....

Promised Land

A Novel of Israel
Author: Martin Fletcher
Publisher: Thomas Dunne Books
ISBN: 1250118840
Category: Fiction
Page: 400
View: 1153

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"Martin Fletcher, who headed up NBC TV’s Tel Aviv News Bureau, knows his territory and it shows on every page. Promised Land is a great sweeping epic, reminiscent of Leon Uris’ Exodus; a moving story of triumph and tragedy, new love and historic hate, expertly told by a cast of unforgettable characters. Fletcher’s writing is superb and rises to the level of importance that this story demands and deserves. Historical novels don’t get much better than Promised Land." —Nelson DeMille, #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Cuban Affair Promised Land is the sweeping saga of two brothers and the woman they love, a devastating love triangle set against the tumultuous founding of Israel. The story begins when fourteen-year-old Peter is sent west to America to escape the growing horror of Nazi Germany. But his younger brother Arie and their entire family are sent east to the death camps. Only Arie survives. The brothers reunite in the nascent Jewish state, where Arie becomes a businessman and one of the richest men in Israel while Peter becomes a top Mossad agent heading some of Israel’s most vital espionage operations. One brother builds Israel, the other protects it. But they also fall in love with the same woman, Tamara, a lonely Jewish refugee from Cairo. And over the next two decades, as their new homeland faces extraordinary obstacles that could destroy it, the brothers’ intrigues and jealousies threaten to tear their new lives apart. Promised Land is at once the gripping tale of a struggling family and an epic about a struggling nation.

People of the Morning Star


Author: W. Michael Gear,Kathleen O'Neal Gear
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 076533724X
Category: Fiction
Page: 496
View: 5122

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The ancient North American city of Cahokia is threatened by Civil War when the believed reincarnation of divine hero Morning Star is targeted by assassins, prompting his aunt, Matron Blue Heron, to bring the culprits to justice. By the award-winning authors of the First North American series. 25,000 first printing.

The Girl from Krakow


Author: Alex Rosenberg
Publisher: Lake Union Publishing
ISBN: 9781477830819
Category: Fiction
Page: N.A
View: 9615

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It's 1935. Rita Feuerstahl comes to the university in Krakow intent on enjoying her freedom. But life has other things in store--marriage, a love affair, a child, all in the shadows of the oncoming war. When the war arrives, Rita is armed with a secret so enormous that it could cost the Allies everything, even as it gives her the will to live. She must find a way both to keep her secret and to survive amid the chaos of Europe at war. Living by her wits among the Germans as their conquests turn to defeat, she seeks a way to prevent the inevitable doom of Nazism from making her one of its last victims. Can her passion and resolve outlast the most powerful evil that Europe has ever seen? In an epic saga that spans from Paris in the '30s and Spain's Civil War to Moscow, Warsaw, and the heart of Nazi Germany, The Girl from Krakow follows one woman's battle for survival as entire nations are torn apart, never to be the same.

The Garment Maker's Daughter


Author: Hillary Adrienne Stern
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780998241616
Category: Fiction
Page: 362
View: 7191

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The Garment Maker's Daughter is a multigenerational saga of immigrant dreams and sweatshop realities, labor strikes, and women's rights. Lena Rothman is a shirtwaist-maker and devoted suffragette whose plans get derailed when she falls in love with her best friend's boyfriend. Jake Brenner is a passionate and charismatic labor organizer determined to lead the shirtwaist-makers on a high-stakes strike. And Daniel Cowan is a brilliant and ambitious night-school student hobbled by a shameful past. Fate draws them together. But secrets will tear them apart. When a devastating blaze engulfs the shirtwaist factory, Lena must fight for her life. And in the chaos of the fire's aftermath, mistakes will be made with consequences that continue into the next generation. The Garment Maker's Daughter is a story of unforgettable characters and the threads of friendship, love, betrayal, and redemption that form the fabric of their lives.

Re-examining the Holocaust Through Literature


Author: Aukje Kluge,Benn E. Williams
Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: 396
View: 7595

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In the late 1980s, Holocaust literature emerged as a provocative, but poorly defined, scholarly field. The essays in this volume reflect the increasingly international and pluridisciplinary nature of this scholarship and the widening of the definition of Holocaust literature to include comic books, fiction, film, and poetry, as well as the more traditional diaries, memoirs, and journals. Ten contributors from four countries engage issues of authenticity, evangelicalism, morality, representation, personal experience, and wish-fulfillment in Holocaust literature, which have been the subject of controversies in the US, Europe, and the Middle East. Of interest to students and instructors of antisemitism, national and comparative literatures, theater, film, history, literary criticism, religion, and Holocaust studies, this book also contains an extensive bibliography with references in over twenty languages which seeks to inspire further research in an international context.

The Far Side of the Sky

A Novel of Love and Survival in War-Torn Shanghai
Author: Daniel Kalla
Publisher: Forge Books
ISBN: 1429960515
Category: Fiction
Page: 464
View: 5118

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November 9, 1938—Kristallnacht—the Nazis unleash a night of terror for Jews all across Germany. Meanwhile, the Japanese Imperial Army rampages through China and tightens its stranglehold on Shanghai, a city that becomes the last haven for thousands of desperate European Jews. Dr. Franz Adler, a renowned surgeon, is swept up in the wave of anti-Semitic violence and flees to Shanghai with his daughter. At a refugee hospital, Franz meets an enigmatic nurse, Soon Yi "Sunny" Mah. The chemistry between them is intense and immediate, but Sunny's life is shattered when a drunken Japanese sailor murders her father. The danger escalates for Shanghai's Jews as the Japanese attack Pearl Harbor. Facing starvation and disease, Franz struggles to keep the refugee hospital open and protect his family from a terrible fate. The Far Side of the Sky focuses on a short but extraordinary period of Chinese, Japanese, and Jewish history when cultures converged and heroic sacrifices were part of the everyday quest for survival. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

The Book of Abraham


Author: Marek Halter
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781592640393
Category: Fiction
Page: 797
View: 2607

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The story begins in Jerusalem in 70 AD as Abraham the Temple scribe flees the destruction of his home. Two thousand years and a hundred generations later, another Abraham perishes, immolated in the fires of the Warsaw Ghetto.

The Marriage Bureau

The True Story of How Two Matchmakers Arranged Love in Wartime London
Author: Penrose Halson
Publisher: HarperLuxe
ISBN: 9780062670649
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: N.A
View: 7928

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A riveting glimpse of life and love during and after World War II—a heart-warming, touching, and thoroughly absorbing true story of a world gone by. In the spring of 1939, with the Second World War looming, two determined twenty-four-year-olds, Heather Jenner and Mary Oliver, decided to open a marriage bureau. They found a tiny office on London’s Bond Street and set about the delicate business of matchmaking. Drawing on the bureau’s extensive archives, Penrose Halson—who many years later found herself the proprietor of the bureau—tells their story, and those of their clients. From shop girls to debutantes; widowers to war veterans, clients came in search of security, social acceptance, or simply love. And thanks to the meticulous organization and astute intuition of the Bureau’s matchmakers, most found what they were looking for. Penrose Halson draws from newspaper and magazine articles, advertisements, and interviews with the proprietors themselves to bring the romance and heartbreak of matchmaking during wartime to vivid, often hilarious, life in this unforgettable story of a most unusual business. “A book full of charm and hilarity.”—Country Life