The Exploration of the Colorado River and Its Canyons


Author: John Wesley Powell
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101042583
Category: History
Page: 432
View: 9159

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One of the great works of American exploration literature, this account of a scientific expedition forced to survive famine, attacks, mutiny, and some of the most dangerous rapids known to man remains as fresh and exciting today as it was in 1874. The Exploration of the Colorado River and Its Canyons, recently ranked number four on Adventure magazine’s list of top 100 classics, is legendary pioneer John Wesley Powell’s first-person account of his crew’s unprecedented odyssey along the Green and Colorado Rivers and through the Grand Canyon. A bold foray into the heart of the American West’s final frontier, the expedition was achieved without benefit of modern river-running equipment, supplies, or a firm sense of the region’s perilous topography and the attitudes of the native inhabitants towards whites. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Exploration of the Colorado River and Its Canyons


Author: J. W. Powell
Publisher: Courier Corporation
ISBN: 0486120511
Category: History
Page: 448
View: 4051

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Full text of Powell's 1,000-mile expedition down the fabled Colorado in 1869. Superb account of terrain, geology, vegetation, Indians, famine, mutiny, treacherous rapids, mighty canyons. 240 illustrations.

Canyons of the Colorado


Author: John Wesley Powell
Publisher: Cosimo, Inc.
ISBN: 1605204145
Category: Travel
Page: 428
View: 2153

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Since we left the Colorado Chiquito we have seen no evidences that the tribe of Indians inhabiting the plateaus on either side ever come down to the river; but about eleven o'clock to-day we discover an Indian garden at the foot of the wall on the right, just where a little stream with a narrow flood plain comes down through a side canyon. Along the valley the Indians have planted corn, using for irrigation the water which bursts out in springs at the foot of the cliff. The corn is looking quite well, but it is not sufficiently advanced to give us roasting ears; but there are some nice green squashes. We carry ten or a dozen of these on board our boats and hurriedly leave, not willing to be caught in the robbery, yet excusing ourselves by pleading our great want. -from "August 26" Sometimes published under the name The Exploration of the Colorado River and Its Canyons, but more properly known by its original title, Canyons of the Colorado is the gripping personal account of the first navigation of the Colorado River, in 1869, by the man who led the journey. American geologist and explorer JOHN WESLEY POWELL (1834-1902), head of the Powell Geographic Expedition and later director of the U.S. Geological Survey, here regales us with the thrilling tale of the ten-man team and its assignment to map the last unmapped regions of the western territories of the United States. The highlight of their three-month trip: the first known river journey through the wildness of the Grand Canyon. This replica of the 1895 edition includes all the original halftone illustrations. A classic of real-life adventure literature, it continues to captivate armchair explorers today.

Down the Great Unknown

John Wesley Powell's 1869 Journey of Discovery and Tragedy Through the Grand Canyon
Author: Edward Dolnick
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 9780061760341
Category: History
Page: 400
View: 8391

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0n May 24, 1869, a one-armed Civil War veteran named John Wesley Powell and a ragtag band of nine mountain men embarked on the last great quest in the American West. No one had ever explored the fabled Grand Canyon; to adventurers of that era it was a region almost as mysterious as Atlantis -- and as perilous. The ten men set out down the mighty Colorado River in wooden rowboats. Six survived. Drawing on rarely examined diaries and journals, Down the Great Unknown is the first book to tell the full, true story.

River Master: John Wesley Powell's Legendary Exploration of the Colorado River and Grand Canyon (American Grit)


Author: Cecil Kuhne
Publisher: The Countryman Press
ISBN: 1682680738
Category: History
Page: 256
View: 6971

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Experience John Powel's now-famous expedition through the Grand Canyon In 1869, Civil War veteran and amputee Major John Wesley Powell led an expedition down the uncharted Colorado River through the then-nameless Grand Canyon. This is the story of what started as a geological survey, but ended in danger, chaos, and blood. The men were inexperienced and ill-equipped, and they faced unimaginable peril. Along the way there was death, mutiny, and abject terror, but Powell persevered and produced a masterwork of adventure writing still held in the highest regard by the boatmen who follow his course today. With never-before-used primary sources and firsthand experience navigating Powell’s legendary route, Cecil Kuhne brings this remarkable chapter of frontier history to life. The American Grit series brings you true tales of endurance, survival, and ingenuity from the annals of American history. These books focus on the trials of remarkable individuals with an emphasis on rich primary source material and artwork.

Beyond the Hundredth Meridian

John Wesley Powell and the Second Opening of the West
Author: Wallace Stegner
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781101075852
Category: History
Page: 496
View: 4156

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From the “dean of Western writers” (The New York Times) and the Pulitzer Prize winning–author of Angle of Repose and Crossing to Safety, a fascinating look at the old American West and the man who prophetically warned against the dangers of settling it In Beyond the Hundredth Meridian, Wallace Stegner recounts the sucesses and frustrations of John Wesley Powell, the distinguished ethnologist and geologist who explored the Colorado River, the Grand Canyon, and the homeland of Indian tribes of the American Southwest. A prophet without honor who had a profound understanding of the American West, Powell warned long ago of the dangers economic exploitation would pose to the West and spent a good deal of his life overcoming Washington politics in getting his message across. Only now, we may recognize just how accurate a prophet he was.

A River Running West

The Life of John Wesley Powell
Author: Donald Worster
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780195156355
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 673
View: 1868

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John Wesley Powell, the great American explorer and environmental pioneer, embodied the energy, optimism, and westward impulse of the young United States. "A River Running West" is a gorgeously written, magisterial account of this towering figure, a true story of undaunted courage. 42 halftones. 7 maps.

The Mountains of California


Author: John Muir
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: California
Page: 381
View: 3836

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Famed naturalist John Muir (1838-1914) came to Wisconsin as a boy and studied at the University of Wisconsin. He first came to California in 1868 and devoted six years to the study of the Yosemite Valley. After work in Nevada, Utah, and Colorado, he returned to California in 1880 and made the state his home. One of the heroes of America's conservation movement, Muir deserves much of the credit for making the Yosemite Valley a protected national park and for alerting Americans to the need to protect this and other natural wonders. The mountains of California (1894) is his book length tribute to the beauties of the Sierras. He recounts not only his own journeys by foot through the mountains, glaciers, forests, and valleys, but also the geological and natural history of the region, ranging from the history of glaciers, the patterns of tree growth, and the daily life of animals and insects. While Yosemite naturally receives great attention, Muir also expounds on less well known beauty spots.

How the Canyon Became Grand

A Short History
Author: Stephen J. Pyne
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101177586
Category: History
Page: 240
View: 3007

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Dismissed by the first Spanish explorers as a wasteland, the Grand Canyon lay virtually unnoticed for three centuries until nineteenth- century America rediscovered it and seized it as a national emblem. This extraordinary work of intellectual and environmental history tells two tales of the Canyon: the discovery and exploration of the physical Canyon and the invention and evolution of the cultural Canyon--how we learned to endow it with mythic significance.Acclaimed historian Stephen Pyne examines the major shifts in Western attitudes toward nature, and recounts the achievements of explorers, geologists, artists, and writers, from John Wesley Powell to Wallace Stegner, and how they transformed the Canyon into a fixture of national identity. This groundbreaking book takes us on a completely original journey through the Canyon toward a new understanding of its niche in the American psyche, a journey that mirrors the making of the nation itself.

First Through Grand Canyon

The Secret Journals and Letters of the 1869 Crew who Explored the Green and Colorado Rivers
Author: Michael Patrick Ghiglieri,George Y. Bradley
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780970097323
Category: Colorado Plateau
Page: 342
View: 7282

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Transcription of the letters and diaries written during the 1869 expedition.

The Journals of Captain Cook


Author: Captain James Cook
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141928085
Category: Literary Collections
Page: 688
View: 5325

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Cook led three famous expeditions to the Pacific Ocean between 1768 and 1779. In voyages that ranged from the Antarctic circle to the Arctic Sea, Cook charted Australia and the whole coast of New Zealand, and brought back detailed descriptions of the natural history of the Pacific. Accounts based on Cook's journals were issued at the time, but it was not until this century that the original journals were published in Beaglehole's definitive edition. The JOURNALS tells the story of these voyages as Cook wanted it to be told, radiating the ambition, courage and skill which enabled him to carry out an unrivalled series of expeditions in dangerous waters.

The Oregon Trail

Sketches of Prairie and Rocky-mountain Life
Author: Francis Parkman
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: California National Historic Trail
Page: 381
View: 1994

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Cadillac Desert

The American West and Its Disappearing Water, Revised Edition
Author: Marc Reisner
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781440672828
Category: Technology & Engineering
Page: 672
View: 1168

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"The definitive work on the West's water crisis." --Newsweek The story of the American West is the story of a relentless quest for a precious resource: water. It is a tale of rivers diverted and dammed, of political corruption and intrigue, of billion-dollar battles over water rights, of ecological and economic disaster. In his landmark book, Cadillac Desert, Marc Reisner writes of the earliest settlers, lured by the promise of paradise, and of the ruthless tactics employed by Los Angeles politicians and business interests to ensure the city's growth. He documents the bitter rivalry between two government giants, the Bureau of Reclamation and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, in the competition to transform the West. Based on more than a decade of research, Cadillac Desert is a stunning expose and a dramatic, intriguing history of the creation of an Eden--an Eden that may only be a mirage. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Emerald Mile

The Epic Story of the Fastest Ride in History Through the Heart of the Grand Canyon
Author: Kevin Fedarko
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1439159866
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 448
View: 5421

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An award-winning Outside magazine writer documents the 1983 Colorado River flood that threatened the region with a catastrophic dam failure and prompted oarsman Kenton Grua's near-suicidal effort to navigate the turbulent waters of the Emerald Mile on a small wooden dory to achieve a world speed record.

In the Heart of the Canyon


Author: Elisabeth Hyde
Publisher: Vintage
ISBN: 0307276422
Category: Fiction
Page: 316
View: 8678

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A rafting trip through the Grand Canyon changes the lives of everyone on board, including a jaded guide; a septuagenarian couple who know they will never make this trip again; and a teenager and her mother, who will face the most daunting journey of all.

Domestic Manners of the Americans


Author: Fanny Trollope
Publisher: Library of Alexandria
ISBN: 1465514686
Category:
Page: 308
View: 5784

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Published in 1832, the book presents a lively portrait of early 19th-century America as observed by a woman of rare intelligence and keen perception. Trollope left no stone unturned, commenting on American dress, food, speech, politics, manners, customs, the landscape, architecture, and more — often critically but always with considerable insight and literary flair.

The Four Voyages of Christopher Columbus


Author: Christopher Columbus
Publisher: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0141920424
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 320
View: 9565

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No gamble in history has been more momentous than the landfall of Columbus's ship the Santa Maria in the Americas in 1492 - an event that paved the way for the conquest of a 'New World'. The accounts collected here provide a vivid narrative of his voyages throughout the Caribbean and finally to the mainland of Central America, although he still believed he had reached Asia. Columbus himself is revealed as a fascinating and contradictory figure, fluctuating from awed enthusiasm to paranoia and eccentric geographical speculation. Prey to petty quarrels with his officers, his pious desire to bring Christian civilization to 'savages' matched by his rapacity for gold, Columbus was nonetheless an explorer and seaman of staggering vision and achievement.