Ethics of Everyday Life

Moral Theology, Social Anthropology, and the Imagination of the Human
Author: Michael Banner,Michael C.. Banner
Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0198722060
Category: Religion
Page: 223
View: 8676

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The moments in Christ's human life noted in the creeds (his conception, birth, suffering, death, and burial) are events which would likely appear in a syllabus for a course in social anthropology, for they are of special interest and concern in human life, and also sites of contention and controversy, where what it is to be human is discovered, constructed, and contested. In other words, these are the occasions for profound and continuing questioning regarding the meaning of human life, as controversies to do with IVF, abortion, euthanasia, and the use of bodies or body parts post mortem plainly indicate. Thus the following questions arise, how do the instances in Christ's life represent human life, and how do these representations relate to present day cultural norms, expectations, and newly emerging modes of relationship, themselves shaping and framing human life? How does the Christian imagination of human life, which dwells on and draws from the life of Christ, not only articulate its own, but also come into conversation with and engage other moral imaginaries of the human? Michael Banner argues that consideration of these questions requires study of moral theology, therefore, he reconceives its nature and tasks, and in particular, its engagement with social anthropology. Drawing from social anthropology and Christian thought and practice from many periods, and influenced especially by his engagement in public policy matters including as a member of the UK's Human Tissue Authority, Banner aims to develop the outlines of an everyday ethics, stretching from before the cradle to after the grave.

Theatre and Everyday Life

An Ethics of Performance
Author: Alan Read
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113491458X
Category: Performing Arts
Page: 276
View: 3953

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Alan Read asserts that there is no split between the practice and theory of theatre, but a divide between the written and the unwritten. In this revealing book, he sets out to retrieve the theatre of spontaneity and tactics, which grows out of the experience of everyday life. It is a theatre which defines itself in terms of people and places rather than the idealised empty space of avant garde performance. Read examines the relationship between an ethics of performance, a politics of place and a poetics of the urban environment. His book is a persuasive demand for a critical theory of theatre which is as mentally supple as theatre is physically versatile.

Working

its meaning and its limits
Author: Gilbert Meilaender
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: Philosophy
Page: 271
View: 1862

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The wide range of readings in Working: Its Meaning and Its Limits proposes different ways of thinking about something most of us do every day -- work. As part of the Ethics of Everyday Life series, these readings are an invitation to reflection and conversation. They focus not on rules for the workplace or on dilemmas in business ethics but on one of the most fundamental aspects of human existence in every time and place. Gilbert C. Meilaender presents varied readings that explore many of the ways in which human beings have thought about the place of work in life -- its meanings, its limits, and its relation to other obligations, to the life cycle, to play, and to rest. The readings in this volume range in time from the world of ancient Israel and the classical world of Greece and Rome to contemporary American society. They range in complexity from "The Little Red Hen" to philosophers such as Charles Taylor and Alasdair MacIntyre, and in genre from poetry by Kipling and George Herbert to essays by Dorothy Sayers and Roger Angell; from novels by Tolstoy and Twain to treatises by Marx, Aristotle, and Karl Barth -- all placed in the context of an extended discussion of the meaning of work in human life by Meilaender's introduction. Working: Its Meaning and Its Limits enables any reader interested in understanding the moral and spiritual significance of work in our lives to enter into a conversation not only about what we do but who we are.

Being Good

Buddhist Ethics for Everyday Life
Author: Hsing Yun
Publisher: Buddha's Light Publishing
ISBN: 1932293345
Category: Philosophy
Page: 195
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Being Good invites readers to consider what it means to lead a good life. In this collection of essays, Venerable Master Hsing Yun offers practical advice on specific moral and ethical issues, using passages from the Buddhist scriptures as points of departure for his discussions.Topics include controlling the body and speech, overcoming greed, ending anger, having patience under insult, getting along with others, as well as what it means to practice Buddhism, and the joys and blessings that can come from that practice.

The eternal pity

reflections on dying
Author: Richard John Neuhaus
Publisher: Univ of Notre Dame Pr
ISBN: N.A
Category: Philosophy
Page: 181
View: 1691

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Drawing upon a vast range of human experience and reflection, The Eternal Pity: Reflections on Dying demonstrates how people have tried to cope with the inevitability of death. Different cultures, informed by religious belief and sometimes desperate hope, teach people to respond to their own death and the death of others in modes as various as defiance, stoic resignation, and grief unbridled to the point of exhaustion. In addition to examples from literature, poetry, and religious texts, Father Richard John Neuhaus provides an intensely personal account of his encounter with death through emergency cancer surgery, and reflects on the changes that encounter has made in the way he lives. While some contemporary writers have deplored the "denial of death" in our culture, The Eternal Pity shows how themes of death and dying are perennial and pervasive, although not always made entirely specific. Society may be viewed as a disorganized march of multitudes waving little banners of meaning in the face of the threat of non-being that is death. Some selections in this book reveal people utterly surprised by their mortality; others highlight how the whole of one's life can be a preparation for what used to be called "a good death." For some, life is a relentless effort to hold death at bay; for others, death is, although not welcomed, reflectively anticipated. Nothing so universally defines the human condition as the fact that we shall die. The Eternal Pity helps us to understand how the prospect of that final indignity compels a variety of decisions about how we might live.

Communities of Complicity

Everyday Ethics in Rural China
Author: Hans Steinm
Publisher: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 0857458914
Category: Social Science
Page: 290
View: 7108

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Everyday life in contemporary rural China is characterized by an increased sense of moral challenge and uncertainty. Ordinary people often find themselves caught between the moral frameworks of capitalism, Maoism and the Chinese tradition. This ethnographic study of the village of Zhongba (in Hubei Province, central China) is an attempt to grasp the ethical reflexivity of everyday life in rural China. Drawing on descriptions of village life, interspersed with targeted theoretical analyses, the author examines how ordinary people construct their own senses of their lives and their futures in everyday activities: building houses, working, celebrating marriages and funerals, gambling and dealing with local government. The villagers confront moral uncertainty; they creatively harmonize public discourse and local practice; and sometimes they resolve incoherence and unease through the use of irony. In so doing, they perform everyday ethics and re-create transient moral communities at a time of massive social dislocation.

Ordinary Ethics

Anthropology, Language, and Action
Author: Michael Lambek
Publisher: Fordham Univ Press
ISBN: 0823233162
Category: Philosophy
Page: 458
View: 3291

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Bringing together ethnographic exposition with philosophical concepts and arguments and effectively transcending subdisciplinary boundaries between cultural and linguistic anthropology, the essays collected in this volume explore the ethical entailments of speech and action and demonstrate the centrality of ethical practice, judgment, reasoning, responsibility, cultivation, commitment, and questioning in social life. Rather than focus on codes of conduct or hot-button issues, they make the cumulative argument that ethics is profoundly 'ordinary', pervasive - and possibly even intrinsic to speech and action. In addition to deepening our understanding of ethics, the volume makes an incisive and necessary intervention in anthropological theory, recasting discussion in ways that force us to rethink such concepts as power, agency, and relativism. Individual chapters consider the place of ethics with respect to conversation and interaction; judgment and responsibility; formality, etiquette, performance, ritual, and law; character and empathy; social boundaries and exclusions; socialization and punishment; and commemoration, history, and living together in peace and war.

Ordinary Ethics in China


Author: Charles Stafford
Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 0857858106
Category: Philosophy
Page: 288
View: 2360

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Drawing on a wide range of anthropological case studies, this book focuses on ordinary ethics in contemporary China. The book examines the kinds of moral and ethical issues that emerge (sometimes almost unnoticed) in the flow of everyday life in Chinese communities. How are schoolchildren judged to be good or bad by their teachers and their peers - and how should a 'bad' student be dealt with? What exactly do children owe their parents, and how should this debt be repaid? Is it morally acceptable to be jealous if one's neighbours suddenly become rich? Should the wrongs of the past be forgotten, e.g. in the interests of communal harmony, or should they be dealt with now? In the case of China, such questions have obviously been shaped by the historical contexts against which they have been posed, and by the weight of various Chinese traditions. But this book approaches them on a human scale. More specifically, it approaches them from an anthropological perspective, based on participation in the flow of everyday life during ethnographic fieldwork in Chinese communities.

Introducing Ethics for Everyday Life

A Practical Guide
Author: Dave Robinson
Publisher: Icon Books Ltd
ISBN: 1848313713
Category: Philosophy
Page: 224
View: 2170

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Ethical philosophy has a long and distinguished history, but how can you apply it to your life? This Practical Guide explores the alternative ethical philosophies and how we can all use these to aid us with everyday dilemmas. Introducing Ethics for Everyday Life provides advice on whether human beings really are selfish and greedy, why you might want to be a good person, and how to pick an ethical philosophy that works for you. Free of jargon but full of straightforward advice, case studies and step-by-step instructions, this is the perfect concise introduction to using ethics to help you make decisions.

Cheating

Ethics and Law in Everyday Life
Author: Deborah L. Rhode
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190672420
Category: LAW
Page: 224
View: 7833

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"Cheating is deeply embedded in everyday life. Costs attributable to its most common forms total close to a trillion dollars annually. This book offers the only recent comprehensive account of cheating in everyday life and the strategies necessary to address it across a wide range of contexts: sports, organizations, taxes, academia, copyright infringement, marriage, and insurance and mortgages"--

Nursing Ethics in Everyday Practice


Author: Connie M. Ulrich
Publisher: Sigma Theta Tau
ISBN: 1935476505
Category: Medical
Page: 227
View: 6756

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This book is written specifically for bedside/staff nurses at the front lines of health care in hospitals, hospice, long-term care, and home health care. Presented in a simple, easy-to-read and engaging style so that nurses can readily put the information to use in a clinical setting. Provides a framework that staff nurses can implement to resolve the ethical dilemmas they frequently encounter in practice. Great for students and covers both theory and practical applications.

Ethics for Everyday


Author: David Benatar
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Humanities, Social Sciences & World Languages
ISBN: 9780072408898
Category: Applied ethics
Page: 860
View: 794

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Telling lies, gossiping, practicing adultery, gambling, smoking, using offensive language, corporal punishment of one’s children, copying copyrighted material – these are moral issues that affect, and often deeply affect, our daily lives.Everyday Ethicsis a collection of readings devoted to ethical problems like these that confront ordinary people in everyday life. The anthology covers the areas of communication, sex, parents and children, animals, money matters, and body and environment. Nearly all selections are from the late 1980s and the 1990s.

The Ethics of Identity


Author: Kwame Anthony Appiah
Publisher: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400826195
Category: Philosophy
Page: 384
View: 5813

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Race, ethnicity, nationality, religion, gender, sexuality: in the past couple of decades, a great deal of attention has been paid to such collective identities. They clamor for recognition and respect, sometimes at the expense of other things we value. But to what extent do "identities" constrain our freedom, our ability to make an individual life, and to what extent do they enable our individuality? In this beautifully written work, renowned philosopher and African Studies scholar Kwame Anthony Appiah draws on thinkers through the ages and across the globe to explore such questions. The Ethics of Identity takes seriously both the claims of individuality--the task of making a life---and the claims of identity, these large and often abstract social categories through which we define ourselves. What sort of life one should lead is a subject that has preoccupied moral and political thinkers from Aristotle to Mill. Here, Appiah develops an account of ethics, in just this venerable sense--but an account that connects moral obligations with collective allegiances, our individuality with our identities. As he observes, the question who we are has always been linked to the question what we are. Adopting a broadly interdisciplinary perspective, Appiah takes aim at the clichés and received ideas amid which talk of identity so often founders. Is "culture" a good? For that matter, does the concept of culture really explain anything? Is diversity of value in itself? Are moral obligations the only kind there are? Has the rhetoric of "human rights" been overstretched? In the end, Appiah's arguments make it harder to think of the world as divided between the West and the Rest; between locals and cosmopolitans; between Us and Them. The result is a new vision of liberal humanism--one that can accommodate the vagaries and variety that make us human.

Everyday Ethics and Social Change

The Education of Desire
Author: Anna Lisa Peterson
Publisher: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231148720
Category: Philosophy
Page: 201
View: 6473

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Americans increasingly cite moral values as a factor in how they vote, but when we define morality simply in terms of a voter's position on gay marriage and abortion, we lose sight of the ethical decisions that guide our everyday lives. In our encounters with friends, family members, nature, and nonhuman creatures, we practice a nonutilitarian morality that makes sacrifice a rational and reasonable choice. Recognizing these everyday ethics, Anna L. Peterson argues, helps us move past the seemingly irreconcilable conflicts of culture and refocus on issues that affect real social change. Peterson begins by divining a "second language" for personal and political values, a vocabulary derived from the loving and mutually beneficial relationships of daily life. Even if our interactions with others are fleeting and fragmentary, they provide a viable alternative to the contractual and atomistic attitudes of mainstream culture. Everyday ethics point toward a more just, humane, and sustainable society, and to acknowledge moments of grace in our daily encounters is to realize a different way of relating to people and nonhuman nature--an alternative ethic to cynicism and rank consumerism. In redefining the parameters of morality, Peterson enables us to make fundamental problems such as the distribution of wealth, the use of public land and natural resources, labor and employment policy, and the character of political institutions the preferred focus of debate and action.

Taking Life

Three Theories on the Ethics of Killing
Author: Torbjorn Tannsjo
Publisher: OUP Us
ISBN: 0190225580
Category: Philosophy
Page: 328
View: 6329

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When and why is it right to kill? When and why is it wrong? Torbjörn Tännsjö examines three theories on the ethics of killing in this book: deontology, a libertarian moral rights theory, and utilitarianism. The implications of each theory are worked out for different kinds of killing: trolley-cases, murder, capital punishment, suicide, assisted death, abortion, killing in war, and the killing of animals. These implications are confronted with our intuitions in relation to them, and our moral intuitions are examined in turn. Only those intuitions that survive an understanding of how we have come to hold them are seen as 'considered' intuitions. The idea is that the theory that can best explain the content of our considered intuitions gains inductive support from them. We must transcend our narrow cultural horizons and avoid certain cognitive mistakes in order to hold considered intuitions. In this volume, suitable for courses in ethics and applied ethics, Tännsjö argues that in the final analysis utilitarianism can best account for, and explain, our considered intuitions about all these kinds of killing.

Ethics for Everyday with Free Ethics PowerWeb


Author: David Benatar
Publisher: McGraw-Hill Humanities, Social Sciences & World Languages
ISBN: 9780072840766
Category: Philosophy
Page: 896
View: 5687

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Telling lies, gossiping, practicing adultery, gambling, smoking, using offensive language, corporal punishment of one’s children, copying copyrighted material – these are moral issues that affect, and often deeply affect, our daily lives. Everyday Ethics is a collection of readings devoted to ethical problems like these that confront ordinary people in everyday life. The anthology covers the areas of communication, sex, parents and children, animals, money matters, and body and environment. Nearly all selections are from the late 1980s and the 1990s.

Lost in Media

The Ethics of Everyday Life
Author: Benjamin Frymer,Tony Kashani
Publisher: Peter Lang Publishing
ISBN: 9781433113666
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 207
View: 7357

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"Lost in Media examines collectively the ethical issues that have arisen in media-driven everyday life and will that arise as paradigm shifts occur on a global scale. Films, television and the new media often serve the globalization aims of a capitalist society as they function to socially reproduce the hegemonic norms, values, and styles of the larger society. Chapters in the book use the tradition of critical theory to look at issues of free market fundamentalism, journalism's erosion of communication of truth, public relations ethics of perception management; yielding self-censorship in the media, entertainment media pedagogically cultivating consumerism and docility, music and morality, misrepresentation of resistance movements, ethics of spectatorship, and the transformation of everyday ethics."--Back cover.

New Methuselahs

The Ethics of Life Extension
Author: John K. Davis
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262347237
Category: Science
Page: 368
View: 4645

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An examination of the ethical issues raised by the possibility of human life extension, including its desirability, unequal access, and the threat of overpopulation. Life extension—slowing or halting human aging—is now being taken seriously by many scientists. Although no techniques to slow human aging yet exist, researchers have successfully slowed aging in yeast, mice, and fruit flies, and have determined that humans share aging-related genes with these species. In New Methuselahs, John Davis offers a philosophical discussion of the ethical issues raised by the possibility of human life extension. Why consider these issues now, before human life extension is a reality? Davis points out that, even today, we are making policy and funding decisions about human life extension research that have ethical implications. With New Methuselahs, he provides a comprehensive guide to these issues, offering policy recommendations and a qualified defense of life extension. After an overview of the ethics and science of life extension, Davis considers such issues as the desirability of extended life; whether refusing extended life is a form of suicide; the Malthusian threat of overpopulation; equal access to life extension; and life extension and the right against harm. In the end, Davis sides neither with those who argue that there are no moral objections to life enhancement nor with those who argue that the moral objections are so strong that we should never develop it. Davis argues that life extension is, on balance, a good thing and that we should fund life extension research aggressively, and he proposes a feasible and just policy for preventing an overpopulation crisis.

Everyday Ethics

Inspired Solutions to Real-life Dilemmas
Author: Joshua Halberstam
Publisher: Penguin Group USA
ISBN: 9780140165586
Category: Philosophy
Page: 204
View: 7277

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A guide to solving real-life dilemmas debunks time-honored cliche+a7s of religion and psychotherapy to encourage readers to develop a moral imagination. 25,000 first printing.

Care in Everyday Life

An Ethic of Care in Practice
Author: Marian Barnes
Publisher: Policy Press
ISBN: 1847428223
Category: Political Science
Page: 210
View: 8066

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The essential idea of care in health and social policy has recently been swept aside as governments increasingly focus on freedom of choice in health and social services. In this wide-ranging book, Marian Barnes attempts to restore care as a fundamental value in private lives and public policy. Applying feminist ethics to topics such as well-being, social justice, and the ways we relate to one another and the places in which we live, she examines the public debate on care in social policy. Both accessible and broad, Care in Everyday Life reintroduces a much-needed humanitarian perspective on the policies and practices that affect so many people.