Nature and Culture

Rebuilding Lost Connections
Author: Sarah Pilgrim,Jules N. Pretty
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136532005
Category: Science
Page: 296
View: 3835

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There is a growing recognition that the diversity of life comprises both biological and cultural diversity. But this division is not universal and, in many cases, has been deepened by the common disciplinary divide between the natural and social sciences and our apparent need to manage and control nature. This book goes beyond divisive definitions and investigates the bridges linking biological and cultural diversity. The international team of authors explore the common drivers of loss, and argue that policy responses should target both forms of diversity in a novel integrative approach to conservation, thus reducing the gap between science, policy and practice. While conserving nature alongside human cultures presents unique challenges, this book forcefully shows that any hope for saving biological diversity is predicated on a concomitant effort to appreciate and protect cultural diversity.

Wanderlust

A History of Walking
Author: Rebecca Solnit
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781101199558
Category: Social Science
Page: 336
View: 5608

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A passionate, thought provoking exploration of walking as a political and cultural activity, from the author of Men Explain Things to Me Drawing together many histories--of anatomical evolution and city design, of treadmills and labyrinths, of walking clubs and sexual mores--Rebecca Solnit creates a fascinating portrait of the range of possibilities presented by walking. Arguing that the history of walking includes walking for pleasure as well as for political, aesthetic, and social meaning, Solnit focuses on the walkers whose everyday and extreme acts have shaped our culture, from philosophers to poets to mountaineers. She profiles some of the most significant walkers in history and fiction--from Wordsworth to Gary Snyder, from Jane Austen's Elizabeth Bennet to Andre Breton's Nadja--finding a profound relationship between walking and thinking and walking and culture. Solnit argues for the necessity of preserving the time and space in which to walk in our ever more car-dependent and accelerated world.

Men

Notes from an Ongoing Investigation
Author: Laura Kipnis
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 1627791876
Category: Social Science
Page: 224
View: 3355

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The author of How to Become a Scandal presents a heavily researched collection of essays on the archetypes of wayward masculinity to offer intellectual insight into notorious public examples.

Riding the Black Cockatoo


Author: John Danalis
Publisher: Allen & Unwin
ISBN: 1741763568
Category: Juvenile Nonfiction
Page: 276
View: 2776

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All through his growing-up years, John Danalis's family had an Aboriginal skull on the mantelpiece; yet only as an adult after enrolling in an Indigenous Writing course did he ask his family where it came from and whether it should be restored to its rightful owners. This is the compelling story of how the skull of an Aboriginal man, found on the banks of the Murray River more than 40 years ago, came to be returned to his Wamba Wamba descendants. It is a story of awakening, atonement, forgiveness, and friendship. ""It is as if a whole window into Indigenous culture has blown open, not jus.

A California Bestiary


Author: Rebecca Solnit,Mona Caron
Publisher: Heyday
ISBN: 9781597141253
Category: Art
Page: 47
View: 7789

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Inspired by medieval bestiaries, a creative survey of the author and illustrator's magical beasts imagines the characteristics and illusory properties of various fantastical native California creatures, from the bluebelly lizard and the California condor to the elephant seal and the tule elk, in a volume created in partnership with the Oakland Zoo.

As Eve Said to the Serpent

On Landscape, Gender, and Art
Author: Rebecca Solnit
Publisher: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 9780820324937
Category: Social Science
Page: 234
View: 4199

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A multidisciplinary compilation of nineteen incisive essays ranges from the formality of traditional art criticism to intimate, lyrical meditations as they explore nuclear test sites, the meaning of national borders and geographical features, and the idea of the feminine and the sublime.

The Faraway Nearby


Author: Rebecca Solnit
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0143125494
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 259
View: 6508

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A companion to A Field Guide for Getting Lost explores the ways that people construct lives from stories and connect to each other through empathy, narrative and imagination, sharing illustrative anecdotes about historical figures and members of her own family. By the National Book Critics Circle Award-winning author of River of Shadows.

A Field Guide to Getting Lost


Author: Rebecca Solnit
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781101118719
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 224
View: 7733

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A stimulating exploration of wandering, being lost, and the uses of the unknown from the author of Men Explain Things To Me Written as a series of autobiographical essays, A Field Guide to Getting Lost draws on emblematic moments and relationships in Rebecca Solnit's life to explore issues of uncertainty, trust, loss, memory, desire, and place. Solnit is interested in the stories we use to navigate our way through the world, and the places we traverse, from wilderness to cities, in finding ourselves, or losing ourselves. While deeply personal, her own stories link up to larger stories, from captivity narratives of early Americans to the use of the color blue in Renaissance painting, not to mention encounters with tortoises, monks, punk rockers, mountains, deserts, and the movie Vertigo. The result is a distinctive, stimulating voyage of discovery. From the Trade Paperback edition.

A Book of Migrations


Author: Rebecca Solnit
Publisher: Verso Books
ISBN: 1844677087
Category: Travel
Page: 208
View: 7972

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"A brilliant meditation on travel."—The New York Times In this acclaimed exploration of the culture of others, Rebecca Solnit travels through Ireland, the land of her long-forgotten maternal ancestors. A Book of Migrations portrays in microcosm a history made of great human tides of invasion, colonization, emigration, nomadism and tourism. Enriched by cross-cultural comparisons with the history of the American West, A Book of Migrations carves a new route through Ireland's history, literature and landscape.

Men Explain Things to Me


Author: Rebecca Solnit
Publisher: Haymarket Books
ISBN: 1608464571
Category: Social Science
Page: 130
View: 9711

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In her comic, scathing essay “Men Explain Things to Me,” Rebecca Solnit took on what often goes wrong in conversations between men and women. She wrote about men who wrongly assume they know things and wrongly assume women don’t, about why this arises, and how this aspect of the gender wars works, airing some of her own hilariously awful encounters. She ends on a serious note— because the ultimate problem is the silencing of women who have something to say, including those saying things like, “He’s trying to kill me!” This book features that now-classic essay with six perfect complements, including an examination of the great feminist writer Virginia Woolf ’s embrace of mystery, of not knowing, of doubt and ambiguity, a highly original inquiry into marriage equality, and a terrifying survey of the scope of contemporary violence against women. Writer, historian, and activist Rebecca Solnit is the author of eighteen or so books on feminism, western and indigenous history, popular power, social change and insurrection, wandering and walking, hope and disaster, including the books Men Explain Things to Me and Hope in the Dark, both also with Haymarket; a trilogy of atlases of American cities; The Faraway Nearby; A Paradise Built in Hell: The Extraordinary Communities that Arise in Disaster; A Field Guide to Getting Lost; Wanderlust: A History of Walking; and River of Shadows, Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West (for which she received a Guggenheim, the National Book Critics Circle Award in criticism, and the Lannan Literary Award). A product of the California public education system from kindergarten to graduate school, she is a columnist at Harper's and a regular contributor to the Guardian.

Desert Exile

The Uprooting of a Japanese American Family
Author: Yoshiko Uchida
Publisher: University of Washington Press
ISBN: 0295806532
Category: Social Science
Page: 184
View: 3159

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After the attack on Pearl Harbor, everything changed for Yoshiko Uchida. Desert Exile is her autobiographical account of life before and during World War II. The book does more than relate the day-to-day experience of living in stalls at the Tanforan Racetrack, the assembly center just south of San Francisco, and in the Topaz, Utah, internment camp. It tells the story of the courage and strength displayed by those who were interned. Replaces ISBN 9780295961903

River of Shadows

Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West
Author: Rebecca Solnit
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 1101662662
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 320
View: 1639

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The world as we know it today began in California in the late 1800s, and Eadweard Muybridge had a lot to do with it. This striking assertion is at the heart of Rebecca Solnit’s new book, which weaves together biography, history, and fascinating insights into art and technology to create a boldly original portrait of America on the threshold of modernity. The story of Muybridge—who in 1872 succeeded in capturing high-speed motion photographically—becomes a lens for a larger story about the acceleration and industrialization of everyday life. Solnit shows how the peculiar freedoms and opportunities of post–Civil War California led directly to the two industries—Hollywood and Silicon Valley—that have most powerfully defined contemporary society.

Loitering

New & Collected Essays
Author: Charles D'Ambrosio
Publisher: Tin House Books
ISBN: 1935639870
Category: Literary Collections
Page: 358
View: 4827

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Gathers the limited edition's 11 original essays as well as new and previously uncollected pieces in a volume that offers insight into the author's views on such subjects as Native American whaling, the work of J. D. Salinger and his own family. By the award-winning author of The Point. Original.

Infinite City

A San Francisco Atlas
Author: Rebecca Solnit
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520262492
Category: History
Page: 156
View: 502

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What makes a place? Rebecca Solnit reinvents the traditional atlas, searching for layers of meaning & connections of experience across San Francisco.

A Paradise Built in Hell

The Extraordinary Communities That Arise in Disaster
Author: Rebecca Solnit
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781101459010
Category: Social Science
Page: 368
View: 1663

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A startling investigation of what people do in disasters and why it matters Why is it that in the aftermath of a disaster? whether manmade or natural?people suddenly become altruistic, resourceful, and brave? What makes the newfound communities and purpose many find in the ruins and crises after disaster so joyous? And what does this joy reveal about ordinarily unmet social desires and possibilities? In A Paradise Built in Hell, award-winning author Rebecca Solnit explores these phenomena, looking at major calamities from the 1906 earthquake in San Francisco through the 1917 explosion that tore up Halifax, Nova Scotia, the 1985 Mexico City earthquake, 9/11, and Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans. She examines how disaster throws people into a temporary utopia of changed states of mind and social possibilities, as well as looking at the cost of the widespread myths and rarer real cases of social deterioration during crisis. This is a timely and important book from an acclaimed author whose work consistently locates unseen patterns and meanings in broad cultural histories.

Hollow City

The Siege of San Francisco and the Crisis of American Urbanism
Author: Rebecca Solnit,Susan Schwartzenberg
Publisher: Verso
ISBN: 9781859843635
Category: Architecture
Page: 188
View: 9325

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Reporting from the front lines of gentrification in San Francisco, Rebecca Solnit and Susan Schwartzenberg sound a warning bell to all urban residents. Wealth is just as capable of ravaging cities as poverty.

The Good Sleeper

The Essential Guide to Sleep for Your Baby--and You
Author: Janet Krone Kennedy
Publisher: Macmillan
ISBN: 0805099433
Category: FAMILY & RELATIONSHIPS
Page: 304
View: 7662

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A clinical psychologist who developed a Sleep Disorders Treatment Program at the Manhattan Veterans Affairs Medical Center uses her years of experience to help new parents train their infants to become great sleepers through proven methods and practices. Original.

Change Everything

Creating an Economy for the Common Good
Author: Christian Felber
Publisher: Zed Books Ltd.
ISBN: 1783604751
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 272
View: 1147

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Is it possible for businesses to have a bottom line that is not profit and endless growth, but human dignity, justice, sustainability and democracy? Or an alternative economic model that is untainted by the greed and crises of current financial systems? Christian Felber says it is. Moreover, in Change Everything he shows us how. The Economy for the Common Good is not just an idea, but has already become a broad international movement with thousands of people, hundreds of companies, and dozens of communities and organizations participating, developing and implementing it. Published in English for the first time, this is a remarkable blueprint for change that will profoundly influence debates on reshaping our economy for the future.

Unruly Places

Lost Spaces, Secret Cities, and Other Inscrutable Geographies
Author: Alastair Bonnett
Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
ISBN: 054410160X
Category: Social Science
Page: 288
View: 610

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A tour of the world’s hidden geographies—from disappearing islands to forbidden deserts—and a stunning testament to how mysterious the world remains today At a time when Google Maps Street View can take you on a virtual tour of Yosemite’s remotest trails and cell phones double as navigational systems, it’s hard to imagine there’s any uncharted ground left on the planet. In Unruly Places, Alastair Bonnett goes to some of the most unexpected, offbeat places in the world to reinspire our geographical imagination. Bonnett’s remarkable tour includes moving villages, secret cities, no man’s lands, and floating islands. He explores places as disorienting as Sandy Island, an island included on maps until just two years ago despite the fact that it never existed. Or Sealand, an abandoned gun platform off the English coast that a British citizen claimed as his own sovereign nation, issuing passports and crowning his wife as a princess. Or Baarle, a patchwork of Dutch and Flemish enclaves where walking from the grocery store’s produce section to the meat counter can involve crossing national borders. An intrepid guide down the road much less traveled, Bonnett reveals that the most extraordinary places on earth might be hidden in plain sight, just around the corner from your apartment or underfoot on a wooded path. Perfect for urban explorers, wilderness ramblers, and armchair travelers struck by wanderlust, Unruly Places will change the way you see the places you inhabit.