The Culture of Copying in Japan

Critical and Historical Perspectives
Author: Rupert Cox
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134397364
Category: Social Science
Page: 288
View: 3044

Continue Reading →

This book challenges the perception of Japan as a ‘copying culture’ through a series of detailed ethnographic and historical case studies. It addresses a question about why the West has had such a fascination for the adeptness with which the Japanese apparently assimilate all things foreign and at the same time such a fear of their skill at artificially remaking and automating the world around them. Countering the idea of a Japan that deviously or ingenuously copies others, it elucidates the history of creative exchanges with the outside world and the particular myths, philosophies and concepts which are emblematic of the origins and originality of copying in Japan. The volume demonstrates the diversity and creativity of copying in the Japanese context through the translation of a series of otherwise loosely related ideas and concepts into objects, images, texts and practices of reproduction, which include: shamanic theatre, puppetry, tea utensils, Kyoto town houses, architectural models, genres of painting, calligraphy, and poetry, ‘sample’ food displays, and the fashion and car industries.

Precarious Japan


Author: Anne Allison
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822377241
Category: Social Science
Page: 256
View: 9618

Continue Reading →

In an era of irregular labor, nagging recession, nuclear contamination, and a shrinking population, Japan is facing precarious times. How the Japanese experience insecurity in their daily and social lives is the subject of Precarious Japan. Tacking between the structural conditions of socioeconomic life and the ways people are making do, or not, Anne Allison chronicles the loss of home affecting many Japanese, not only in the literal sense but also in the figurative sense of not belonging. Until the collapse of Japan's economic bubble in 1991, lifelong employment and a secure income were within reach of most Japanese men, enabling them to maintain their families in a comfortable middle-class lifestyle. Now, as fewer and fewer people are able to find full-time work, hope turns to hopelessness and security gives way to a pervasive unease. Yet some Japanese are getting by, partly by reconceiving notions of home, family, and togetherness.

UC Santa Cruz


Author: University of California, Santa Cruz
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category:
Page: N.A
View: 8952

Continue Reading →

In Praise of Copying


Author: Marcus Boon
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674058429
Category: Philosophy
Page: 294
View: 9214

Continue Reading →

German critic Walter Benjamin wrote some immensely influential words on the work of art in the age of mechanical reproduction. Luxury fashion houses would say something shorter and sharper and much more legally binding on the rip-off merchants who fake their products. Marcus Boon, a Canadian English professor with an accessible turn of phrase, takes us on an erudite voyage through the theme in a serious but engaging encounter with the ideas of thinkers as varied as Plato, Hegel, Orson Welles, Benjamin, Heidegger, Louis Vuitton, Takashi Murakami and many more, on topics as philosophically taxing and pop-culture-light as mimesis, Christianity, capitalism, authenticity, Uma Thurman's handbag and Disneyland.

Nature and Society

Anthropological Perspectives
Author: Philippe Descola,Gisli Palsson
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1134827156
Category: Social Science
Page: 320
View: 7683

Continue Reading →

The contributors to this book focus on the relationship between nature and society from a variety of theoretical and ethnographic perspectives. Their work draws upon recent developments in social theory, biology, ethnobiology, epistemology, sociology of science, and a wide array of ethnographic case studies -- from Amazonia, the Solomon Islands, Malaysia, the Mollucan Islands, rural comunities from Japan and north-west Europe, urban Greece, and laboratories of molecular biology and high-energy physics. The discussion is divided into three parts, emphasising the problems posed by the nature-culture dualism, some misguided attempts to respond to these problems, and potential avenues out of the current dilemmas of ecological discourse.

The Zen Arts

An Anthropological Study of the Culture of Aesthetic Form in Japan
Author: Rupert Cox
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136855513
Category: Philosophy
Page: 296
View: 4104

Continue Reading →

The tea ceremony and the martial arts are intimately linked in the popular and historical imagination with Zen Buddhism, and Japanese culture. They are commonly interpreted as religio-aesthetic pursuits which express core spiritual values through bodily gesture and the creation of highly valued objects. Ideally, the experience of practising the Zen arts culminates in enlightenment. This book challenges that long-held view and proposes that the Zen arts should be understood as part of a literary and visual history of representing Japanese culture through the arts. Cox argues that these texts and images emerged fully as systems for representing the arts during the modern period, produced within Japan as a form of cultural nationalism and outside Japan as part of an orientalist discourse. Practitioners' experiences are in fact rarely referred to in terms of Zen or art, but instead are spatially and socially grounded. Combining anthropological description with historical criticism, Cox shows that the Zen arts are best understood in terms of a dynamic relationship between an aesthetic discourse on art and culture and the social and embodied experiences of those who participate in them.

Asian Anthropology


Author: Jan Van Bremen,Eyal Ben-Ari,Syed Farid Alatas
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113427100X
Category: History
Page: 252
View: 5956

Continue Reading →

Asian Anthropology raises important questions regarding the nature of anthropology and particularly the production and consumption of anthropological knowledge in Asia. Instead of assuming a universal standard or trajectory for the development of anthropology in Asia, the contributors to this volume begin with the appropriate premise that anthropologies in different Asian countries have developed and continue to develop according to their own internal dynamics. With chapters written by an international group of experts in the field, Asian Anthropology will be a useful teaching tool and a valuable resource for scholars working in Asian anthropology.

The Cultural Study of Music

A Critical Introduction
Author: Martin Clayton
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136754326
Category: Music
Page: 376
View: 6609

Continue Reading →

First Published in 2003. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Sapiens

A Brief History of Humankind
Author: Yuval Noah Harari
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0062316109
Category: Science
Page: 464
View: 9791

Continue Reading →

New York Times Bestseller A Summer Reading Pick for President Barack Obama, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg From a renowned historian comes a groundbreaking narrative of humanity’s creation and evolution—a #1 international bestseller—that explores the ways in which biology and history have defined us and enhanced our understanding of what it means to be “human.” One hundred thousand years ago, at least six different species of humans inhabited Earth. Yet today there is only one—homo sapiens. What happened to the others? And what may happen to us? Most books about the history of humanity pursue either a historical or a biological approach, but Dr. Yuval Noah Harari breaks the mold with this highly original book that begins about 70,000 years ago with the appearance of modern cognition. From examining the role evolving humans have played in the global ecosystem to charting the rise of empires, Sapiens integrates history and science to reconsider accepted narratives, connect past developments with contemporary concerns, and examine specific events within the context of larger ideas. Dr. Harari also compels us to look ahead, because over the last few decades humans have begun to bend laws of natural selection that have governed life for the past four billion years. We are acquiring the ability to design not only the world around us, but also ourselves. Where is this leading us, and what do we want to become? Featuring 27 photographs, 6 maps, and 25 illustrations/diagrams, this provocative and insightful work is sure to spark debate and is essential reading for aficionados of Jared Diamond, James Gleick, Matt Ridley, Robert Wright, and Sharon Moalem.

Ritual Theory, Ritual Practice


Author: Catherine Bell
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 9780199760381
Category: Religion
Page: 270
View: 2273

Continue Reading →

Ritual studies today figures as a central element of religious discourse for many scholars around the world. Ritual Theory, Ritual Practice, Catherine Bell's sweeping and seminal work on the subject, helped legitimize the field. In this volume, Bell re-examines the issues, methods, and ramifications of our interest in ritual by concentrating on anthropology, sociology, and the history of religions. Now with a new foreword by Diane Jonte-Pace, Bell's work is a must-read for understanding the evolution of the field of ritual studies and its current state.

Perspectives

Newsletter of the American Historical Association
Author: N.A
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category: History
Page: N.A
View: 9751

Continue Reading →

Consuming Life in Post-Bubble Japan

A Transdisciplinary Perspective
Author: Katarzyna J. Cwiertka,Ewa Machotka
Publisher: Consumption and Sustainability in Asia
ISBN: 9789462980631
Category: Consumer behavior
Page: 256
View: 929

Continue Reading →

The bursting of the economic bubble in the 1990s shook the very foundation of the post-war economic 'miracle' and marked the beginning of a gradual shift in the environmental consciousness of the Japanese. Yet, it by no means removed consumption from the pivotal position it occupied within Japanese society. Consuming Life in Post-Bubble Japan argues that consumption in Japan today is no longer simply a component of everyday economic activities, but rather a reflection of a society guided by the 'logic of late capitalism'. The volume pins down the contradictory nature of the setting in which consuming occurs in Japan today: the veneration of material comfort and convenience on the one hand, and the new rhetoric of recycling and energy conservation on the other. Theoretical insights developed as part of an art-historical enquiry, such as notions of socially engaged art and its critique, offer a new paradigm for investigating this dilemma. By combining case studies analysing the production and consumption of contemporary art with ethnographic material related to ordinary commodities and shopping, this volume provides a novel, transdisciplinary approach to exploring how a 'society of consumers' operates in post-bubble Japan and how contemporary life is a 'consuming project'.

The Japanese Professor

An Ethnography of a University Faculty
Author: Gregory S. Poole
Publisher: Sense Publishers
ISBN: 9789460911545
Category: Education
Page: 188
View: 4647

Continue Reading →

This monograph is a substantial contribution to our knowledge of the internal workings of a Japanese university, focussing on the world view of the professor. In this anthropological case study of a private university in urban Tokyo conducted through extended participant observation, Gregory Poole, at once both an insider and outsider, tells an ethnographic story that explicates a professoriate's working world. The author addresses one basic problem-how do Japanese professors configure their working world? In answering this research question, he demonstrates how the present climate of competition and restructuring means that faculty members in Japan are faced with the challenge of culturally translating largely western concepts of the university while steadfastly preserving their own local culture of higher education. This book describes the resulting cultural debates and competing discourses that surround the key concepts in the work-life of Japanese professors. It is of special interest to scholars in the fields of comparative education, Japanese Studies, and sociocultural anthropology as well as academic and administrative staff employed at universities in Japan and abroad. "There have been few anthropological analyses of the lives and work of university professors in Japan, or for that matter, anywhere else. Poole is able to give satisfactory explanations perhaps for the first time in the English literature as to why Japanese universities function in the ways that they do, ways that sometimes seem bizarre and counter-productive to the western observer." J.S. Eades, Professor of Anthropology and Dean of the School of Asia Pacific Studies, Ritsumeikan Asia Pacific University. Gregory S. Poole is Professor of Anthropology in the Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences at the University of Tsukuba. His area of research includes the anthropology of education, language, and Japan and his publications include Higher Education in East Asia: Neoliberalism and the Professoriate (2009), co-edited with Ya-chen Chen, and "The Japanese University in Crisis" (2005), coauthored with Ikuo Amano (Higher Education).

Witnesses to History

A Compendium of Documents and Writings on the Return of Cultural Objects
Author: Lyndel V. Prott
Publisher: UNESCO
ISBN: 9231041282
Category: Business & Economics
Page: 439
View: 1822

Continue Reading →

This Compendium gives an outline of the historical, philosophical and ethical aspects of the return of cultural objects (e.g. cultural objects displaced during war or in colonial contexts), cites past and present cases (Maya Temple Facade, Nigerian Bronzes, United States of America v. Schultz, Parthenon Marbles and many more) and analyses legal issues (bona fide, relevant UNESCO and UNIDROIT Conventions, Supreme Court Decisions, procedure for requests etc.). It is a landmark publication that bears testament to the ways in which peoples have lost their entire cultural heritage and analyses the issue of its return and restitution by providing a wide range of perspectives on this subject. Essential reading for students, specialists, scholars and decision-makers as well as those interested in these topics.

Imperial Genus

The Formation and Limits of the Human in Modern Korea and Japan
Author: Travis Workman
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520289595
Category: History
Page: 307
View: 4320

Continue Reading →

A free ebook version of this title is available through Luminos, University of California Press’s open access publishing program for monographs. Visit www.luminosoa.org to learn more. Imperial Genus begins with the turn to world culture and ideas of the generally human in Japan’s cultural policy in Korea in 1919. How were concepts of the human’s genus-being operative in the discourses of the Japanese empire? How did they inform the imagination and representation of modernity in colonial Korea? Travis Workman delves into these questions through texts in philosophy, literature, and social science. Imperial Genus focuses on how notions of human generality mediated uncertainty between the transcendental and the empirical, the universal and the particular, and empire and colony. It shows how cosmopolitan cultural principles, the proletarian arts, and Pan-Asian imperial nationalism converged with practices of colonial governmentality. It is a genealogy of the various articulations of the human’s genus-being within modern humanist thinking in East Asia, as well as an exploration of the limits of the human as both concept and historical figure.