The Cultural Politics of Emotion


Author: Sara Ahmed
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135205752
Category: Political Science
Page: 256
View: 2733

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First Published in 2004. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Cultural Politics of Emotion


Author: Sara Ahmed
Publisher: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748691154
Category: Philosophy
Page: 224
View: 1849

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A bold exploration of the relationship between emotions and politics, through case studies on international terrorism, asylum, migration, reconciliation and reparation. Develops a theory of how emotions work and their effects on our daily lives.

The Cultural Politics of Emotion


Author: Sara Ahmed
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135205744
Category: Social Science
Page: 256
View: 4107

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First Published in 2004. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Language and the Politics of Emotion


Author: Catherine A. Lutz,Lila Abu-Lughod
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521388689
Category: Psychology
Page: 228
View: 8220

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Emotions have long been a central concern in philosophy, psychological and sociological studies. When anthropologists began to study emotion, they challenged many assumptions shared by Western academics and lay persons by exposing the cultural variability of emotional meanings. In this collection of original essays by anthropologists concerned with the relationship of language and emotion, it is argued that the key focus to the study of emotion might be the politics of social life rather than the psychology of the individual. Through close studies of talk about emotion and emotional discourses in social contexts from poetry and song to therapeutic narratives, scholars who have worked in India, Fiji, the United States, Egypt, Senegal and the Solomon Islands show how emotion is tied to politics of everyday interaction. Their arguments and cross-cultural findings will intrigue and provoke anyone who has thought about the relationship between emotion, language and social life. The book will be of special interest to those who find the boundaries between cultural, psychological and linguistic anthropology, sociology, cross-cultural psychiatry, and social psychology too confining.

Queer Attachments

The Cultural Politics of Shame
Author: Professor Sally R Munt
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 1409491315
Category: Social Science
Page: 268
View: 331

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Why is shame so central to our identity and to our culture? What is its role in stigmatizing subcultures such as the Irish, the queer or the underclass? Can shame be understood as a productive force? In this lucid and passionately argued book, Sally R. Munt explores the vicissitudes of shame across a range of texts, cultural milieux, historical locations and geographical spaces – from eighteenth-century Irish politics to Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials trilogy, from contemporary US academia to the aesthetics of Tracey Emin. She finds that the dynamics of shame are consistent across cultures and historical periods, and that patterns of shame are disturbingly long-lived. But she also reveals shame as an affective emotion, engendering attachments between bodies and between subjects – queer attachments. Above all, she celebrates the extraordinary human ability to turn shame into joy: the party after the fall. Queer Attachments is an interdisciplinary synthesis of cultural politics, emotions theory and narrative that challenges us to think about the queerly creative proclivities of shame.

Digital Cultures and the Politics of Emotion

Feelings, Affect and Technological Change
Author: Athina Karatzogianni,Adi Kuntsman
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
ISBN: 0230296580
Category: Language Arts & Disciplines
Page: 272
View: 2196

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Fifteen thought-provoking essays engage in an innovative dialogue between cultural studies of affect, feelings and emotions, and digital cultures, new media and technology. The volume provides a fascinating dialogue that cuts across disciplines, media platforms and geographic and linguistic boundaries.

Statistical Panic

Cultural Politics and Poetics of the Emotions
Author: Kathleen Woodward
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822392313
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 330
View: 396

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In this moving and thoughtful book, Kathleen Woodward explores the politics and poetics of the emotions, focusing on American culture since the 1960s. She argues that we are constrained in terms of gender, race, and age by our culture’s scripts for “emotional” behavior and that the accelerating impoverishment of interiority is a symptom of our increasingly media-saturated culture. She also shows how we can be empowered by stories that express our experience, revealing the value of our emotions as a crucial form of intelligence. Referring discreetly to her own experience, Woodward examines the interpenetration of social structures and subjectivity, considering how psychological emotions are social phenomena, with feminist anger, racial shame, old-age depression, and sympathy for non-human cyborgs (including robots) as key cases in point. She discusses how emerging institutional and discursive structures engender “new” affects that in turn can help us understand our changing world if we are attentive to them—the “statistical panic” produced by the risk society, with its numerical portents of disease and mortality; the rage prompted by impenetrable and bloated bureaucracies; the brutal shame experienced by those caught in the crossfire of the media; and the conservative compassion that is not an emotion at all, only an empty political slogan. The orbit of Statistical Panic is wide, drawing in feminist theory, critical phenomenology, and recent theories of the emotions. But at its heart are stories. As an antidote to the vacuous dramas of media culture, with its mock emotions and scattershot sensations, Woodward turns to the autobiographical narrative. Stories of illness—by Joan Didion, Yvonne Rainer, Paul Monette, and Alice Wexler, among others—receive special attention, with the inexhaustible emotion of grief framing the book as a whole.

The Promise of Happiness


Author: Sara Ahmed
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 082239278X
Category: Philosophy
Page: 326
View: 8339

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The Promise of Happiness is a provocative cultural critique of the imperative to be happy. It asks what follows when we make our desires and even our own happiness conditional on the happiness of others: “I just want you to be happy”; “I’m happy if you’re happy.” Combining philosophy and feminist cultural studies, Sara Ahmed reveals the affective and moral work performed by the “happiness duty,” the expectation that we will be made happy by taking part in that which is deemed good, and that by being happy ourselves, we will make others happy. Ahmed maintains that happiness is a promise that directs us toward certain life choices and away from others. Happiness is promised to those willing to live their lives in the right way. Ahmed draws on the intellectual history of happiness, from classical accounts of ethics as the good life, through seventeenth-century writings on affect and the passions, eighteenth-century debates on virtue and education, and nineteenth-century utilitarianism. She engages with feminist, antiracist, and queer critics who have shown how happiness is used to justify social oppression, and how challenging oppression causes unhappiness. Reading novels and films including Mrs. Dalloway, The Well of Loneliness, Bend It Like Beckham, and Children of Men, Ahmed considers the plight of the figures who challenge and are challenged by the attribution of happiness to particular objects or social ideals: the feminist killjoy, the unhappy queer, the angry black woman, and the melancholic migrant. Through her readings she raises critical questions about the moral order imposed by the injunction to be happy.

The Affect Theory Reader


Author: Melissa Gregg,Gregory J. Seigworth
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822347768
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 402
View: 9637

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A collection of essays on affect theory by groundbreaking scholars in the field

Affective Mapping

Melancholia and the Politics of Modernism
Author: Jonathan FLATLEY,Jonathan Flatley
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674036964
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 272
View: 4802

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The surprising claim of this book is that dwelling on loss is not necessarily depressing. Instead, embracing melancholy can be a road back to contact with others and can lead people to productively remap their relationship to the world around them. Flatley demonstrates that a seemingly disparate set of modernist writers and thinkers showed how aesthetic activity can give us the means to comprehend and change our relation to loss.

Differences that Matter

Feminist Theory and Postmodernism
Author: Sara Ahmed
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521597616
Category: History
Page: 222
View: 3581

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Differences That Matter challenges existing ways of theorising the relationship between feminism and postmodernism which ask 'is or should feminism be modern or postmodern?' Sara Ahmed suggests that postmodernism has been allowed to dictate feminist debates and calls instead for feminist theorists to speak (back) to postmodernism, rather than simply speak on (their relationship to) it. Such a 'speaking back' involves a refusal to position postmodernism as a generalisable condition of the world and requires closer readings of what postmodernism is actually 'doing' in a variety of disciplinary contexts. Sara Ahmed hence examines constructions of postmodernism in relation to rights, ethics, subjectivity, authorship, meta-fiction and film.

Blush

Faces of Shame
Author: Elspeth Probyn
Publisher: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 0816627207
Category: Social Science
Page: 197
View: 9638

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Exposes shame as a valuable emotion essential to our humanity.

It's Madness

The Politics of Mental Health in Colonial Korea
Author: Theodore Jun Yoo
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520964047
Category: History
Page: 248
View: 4279

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It’s Madness examines Korea’s years under Japanese colonialism, when mental health first became defined as a medical and social problem. As in most Asian countries, severe social ostracism, shame, and fear of jeopardizing marriage prospects compelled most Korean families to conceal the mentally ill behind closed doors. This book explores the impact of Chinese traditional medicine and its holistic approach to treating mental disorders, the resilience of folk illnesses as explanations for inappropriate and dangerous behaviors, the emergence of clinical psychiatry as a discipline, and the competing models of care under the Japanese colonial authorities and Western missionary doctors. Drawing upon unpublished archival as well as printed sources, this is the first study to examine the ways in which “madness” was understood, classified, and treated in traditional Korea and the role of science in pathologizing and redefining mental illness under Japanese colonial rule.

Power, Politics and the Emotions

Impossible Governance?
Author: Shona Hunter
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136004327
Category: Law
Page: 226
View: 8790

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How can we rethink ideas of policy failure to consider its paradoxes and contradictions as a starting point for more hopeful democratic encounters? Offering a provocative and innovative theorisation of governance as relational politics, the central argument of Power, Politics and the Emotions is that there are sets of affective dynamics which complicate the already materially and symbolically contested terrain of policy-making. This relational politics is Shona Hunter’s starting point for a more hopeful, but realistic understanding of the limits and possibilities enacted through contemporary governing processes. Through this idea Hunter prioritises the everyday lived enactments of policy as a means to understand the state as a more differentiated and changeable entity than is often allowed for in current critiques of neoliberalism. But Hunter reminds us that focusing on lived realities demands a melancholic confrontation with pain, and the risks of social and physical death and violence lived through the contemporary neoliberal state. This is a state characterised by the ascendency of neoliberal whiteness; a state where no one is innocent and we are all responsible for the multiple intersecting exclusionary practices creating its unequal social orderings. The only way to struggle through the central paradox of governance to produce something different is to accept this troubling interdependence between resistance and reproduction and between hope and loss. Analysing the everyday processes of this relational politics through original empirical studies in health, social care and education the book develops an innovative interdisciplinary theoretical synthesis which engages with and extends work in political science, cultural theory, critical race and feminist analysis, critical psychoanalysis and post-material sociology.

The Play of Political Culture, Emotion and Identity


Author: Candida Yates
Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
ISBN: 9780230302525
Category: Psychology
Page: 208
View: 5410

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The Play of Political Culture, Emotion and Identity offers a uniquely 'psycho-cultural' take on the psycho-dynamics of UK political culture. It uses an interdisciplinary approach that draws on theories and research in psychoanalysis, cultural and media studies and political sociology to explore the cultural and emotional processes that shape our relationship to politics in the late modern, media age. Against the backdrop of promotional, celebrity culture and personality politics, the book uses the notion of 'play' as a metaphor to explore the flirtatious dynamics that are often present in the mediatised, interactive sphere of political culture and the discussion is elaborated upon by discussing different aspects of cultural and political identity, including, gender, class and nation. These themes are engaged with through selected case studies and examples, including the flirtation of Tony Blair, Joanna Lumley's Gurkha campaign, Margaret Thatcher's funeral, David Cameron's identity as a father and the populist appeal of UKIP politician, Nigel Farage.

Queer Phenomenology

Orientations, Objects, Others
Author: Sara Ahmed
Publisher: Duke University Press
ISBN: 0822388073
Category: Social Science
Page: 234
View: 1717

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In this groundbreaking work, Sara Ahmed demonstrates how queer studies can put phenomenology to productive use. Focusing on the “orientation” aspect of “sexual orientation” and the “orient” in “orientalism,” Ahmed examines what it means for bodies to be situated in space and time. Bodies take shape as they move through the world directing themselves toward or away from objects and others. Being “orientated” means feeling at home, knowing where one stands, or having certain objects within reach. Orientations affect what is proximate to the body or what can be reached. A queer phenomenology, Ahmed contends, reveals how social relations are arranged spatially, how queerness disrupts and reorders these relations by not following the accepted paths, and how a politics of disorientation puts other objects within reach, those that might, at first glance, seem awry. Ahmed proposes that a queer phenomenology might investigate not only how the concept of orientation is informed by phenomenology but also the orientation of phenomenology itself. Thus she reflects on the significance of the objects that appear—and those that do not—as signs of orientation in classic phenomenological texts such as Husserl’s Ideas. In developing a queer model of orientations, she combines readings of phenomenological texts—by Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty, and Fanon—with insights drawn from queer studies, feminist theory, critical race theory, Marxism, and psychoanalysis. Queer Phenomenology points queer theory in bold new directions.

Atlas of Emotion

Journeys in Art, Architecture, and Film
Author: Giuliana Bruno
Publisher: Verso
ISBN: 9781859848029
Category: Architecture
Page: 484
View: 6101

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Named a 2003 Book of the Year by The Guardian [London], winner of the 2004 Kraszna-Krausz Moving Image Book Award in Culture and History (honoring "the world's best book on the moving images") and honored as an "Outstanding Academic Title" in Choice, the publication of the American Library Association. With forays into the fields of geography, art, architecture, design, cartography, and film, Giuliana Bruno's Atlas of Emotion is a highly original endeavour to map a cultural history of the visual arts. She insists throughout on the inseparability of seeing and travelling. In so doing, she touches on the art of Gerhard Richter and Annette Messager; the filmmaking of Peter Greenaway and Michelangelo Antonioni; the architecture of cinema and its precursors. Visually luscious and daring in conception, the voyage opens new vistas and understandings at every turn.

Compassion

The Culture and Politics of an Emotion
Author: Paul Gilbert, PhD,Lauren Berlant
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135231656
Category: FAMILY & RELATIONSHIPS
Page: 256
View: 7866

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In Compassion, ten scholars draw on literature, psychoanalysis, and social history to provide an archive of cases and genealogies of compassion. Together these essays demonstrate how "being compassionate" is shaped by historical specificity and social training, and how the idea of compassion takes place in scenes that are anxious, volatile, surprising, and even contradictory.

Strange Encounters

Embodied Others in Post-Coloniality
Author: Sara Ahmed
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1135120110
Category: Social Science
Page: 224
View: 6278

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Examining the relationship between strangers, embodiment and community, Strange Encounters challenges the assumptions that the stranger is simply anybody we do not recognize and instead proposes that he or she is socially constructued as somebody we already know. Using feminist and postcolonial theory this book examines the impact of multiculturalism and globalization on embodiment and community whilst considering the ethical and political implication of its critique for post-colonial feminism. A diverse range of texts are analyzed which produce the figure of 'the stranger', showing that it has alternatively been expelled as the origin of danger - such as in neighbourhood watch, or celebrated as the origin of difference - as in multiculturalism. The author argues that both of these standpoints are problematic as they involve 'stranger fetishism'; they assume that the stranger 'has a life of its own'.

From Passions to Emotions

The Creation of a Secular Psychological Category
Author: Thomas Dixon
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781139436977
Category: Political Science
Page: N.A
View: 3126

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Today there is a thriving 'emotions industry' to which philosophers, psychologists and neuroscientists are contributing. Yet until two centuries ago 'the emotions' did not exist. In this path-breaking study Thomas Dixon shows how, during the nineteenth century, the emotions came into being as a distinct psychological category, replacing existing categories such as appetites, passions, sentiments and affections. By examining medieval and eighteenth-century theological psychologies and placing Charles Darwin and William James within a broader and more complex nineteenth-century setting, Thomas Dixon argues that this domination by one single descriptive category is not healthy. Overinclusivity of 'the emotions' hampers attempts to argue with any subtlety about the enormous range of mental states and stances of which humans are capable. This book is an important contribution to the debate about emotion and rationality which has preoccupied western thinkers throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries and has implications for contemporary debates.