The Clubwomen's Daughters

Collectivist Impulses in Progressive-era Girl's Fiction, 1890-1940
Author: Gwen Tarbox
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1317776038
Category: History
Page: 256
View: 4760

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First published in 2000. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

The Political Activities of Detroit Clubwomen in the 1920s

A Challenge and a Promise
Author: Jayne Morris-Crowther
Publisher: Wayne State University Press
ISBN: 081433816X
Category: History
Page: 264
View: 9703

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In the early 1900s, Detroit's clubwomen successfully lobbied for issues like creating playgrounds for children, building public baths, raising the age for child workers, and reforming the school board and city charter. But when they won the vote in 1918, Detroit's clubwomen, both black and white, were eager to incite even greater change. In the 1920s, they fought to influence public policy at the municipal and state level, while contending with partisan politics, city politics, and the media, which often portrayed them as silly and incompetent. In this fascinating volume, author Jayne Morris-Crowther examines the unique civic engagement of these women who considered their commitment to the city of Detroit both a challenge and a promise. By the 1920s, there were eight African American clubs in the city (Willing Workers, Detroit Study Club, Lydian Association, In As Much Circle of Kings Daughters, Labor of Love Circle of Kings Daughters, West Side Art and Literary Club, Altar Society of the Second Baptist Church, and the Earnest Workers of the Second Baptist Church); in 1921, they joined together under the Detroit Association of Colored Women's Clubs. Nearly 15,000 mostly white clubwomen were represented by the Detroit Federation of Women's Clubs, which was formed in 1895 by the unification of the Detroit Review Club, Twentieth Century Club, Detroit Woman's Club, Woman's Historical Club, Clio Club, Wednesday History Club, Hypathia, and Zatema Club. Morris-Crowther begins by investigating the roots of the clubs in pre-suffrage Detroit and charts their growing power. In the end, Morris-Crowther shows that Detroit's clubwomen pioneered new lobbying techniques like personal interviews, and used political education in savvy ways to bring politics to the community level. An appendix contains the 1926 Directory of the Detroit Federation of Women's Clubs.

Southern Ladies, New Women

Race, Region, and Clubwomen in South Carolina, 1890-1930
Author: Joan Marie Johnson
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9780813029559
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 304
View: 381

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Joan Marie Johnson investigates how the desire to create a distinctive southern identity influenced black and white clubwomen at the turn of the 20th century and motivated their participation in efforts at social reform. Often doing similar work for different reasons, both groups emphasized history, memory, and education. Focusing particularly on South Carolina clubs, Southern Ladies, New Women shows that white women promoted a culture of segregation in which southern equaled white and black equaled inferior. Like the United Daughters of the Confederacy, they celebrated the Lost Cause and its racial ideology. African-American clubwomen fought for the needs of their communities, struggled against Jim Crow, and demanded recognition of their citizenship. For both groups, control over historical memory thus became a powerful tool, one with the potential to oppress African-Americans as well as to help free them. This ambitious book illuminates the essence of what South Carolina's clubwomen of both races were thinking, feeling, and attempting to accomplish. It considers the entwined strands of race and gender that hampered their attempts to bridge their differences and that brought tension to their relations with northern clubwomen. It also addresses the seeming paradox of the white clubwomen who belonged simultaneously to tradition-minded organizations, such as the Daughters of the American Revolution or the Colonial Dames, and to a variety of forward-looking associations that engaged in impressive social reform. Although Johnson looks most closely at the Progressive Era in South Carolina, her comparative study of race, gender, reform, and southern identity reveals that women's clubs, both white and black, contributed to the creation of the new cultural climate and social order that emerged throughout the post-Civil-War South. This book will be important for all who are interested in a better understanding of race relations in contemporary America.

The Political Activities of Detroit Clubwomen in the 1920s

A Challenge and a Promise
Author: Jayne Morris-Crowther
Publisher: Wayne State University Press
ISBN: 081433816X
Category: History
Page: 264
View: 8448

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In the early 1900s, Detroit's clubwomen successfully lobbied for issues like creating playgrounds for children, building public baths, raising the age for child workers, and reforming the school board and city charter. But when they won the vote in 1918, Detroit's clubwomen, both black and white, were eager to incite even greater change. In the 1920s, they fought to influence public policy at the municipal and state level, while contending with partisan politics, city politics, and the media, which often portrayed them as silly and incompetent. In this fascinating volume, author Jayne Morris-Crowther examines the unique civic engagement of these women who considered their commitment to the city of Detroit both a challenge and a promise. By the 1920s, there were eight African American clubs in the city (Willing Workers, Detroit Study Club, Lydian Association, In As Much Circle of Kings Daughters, Labor of Love Circle of Kings Daughters, West Side Art and Literary Club, Altar Society of the Second Baptist Church, and the Earnest Workers of the Second Baptist Church); in 1921, they joined together under the Detroit Association of Colored Women's Clubs. Nearly 15,000 mostly white clubwomen were represented by the Detroit Federation of Women's Clubs, which was formed in 1895 by the unification of the Detroit Review Club, Twentieth Century Club, Detroit Woman's Club, Woman's Historical Club, Clio Club, Wednesday History Club, Hypathia, and Zatema Club. Morris-Crowther begins by investigating the roots of the clubs in pre-suffrage Detroit and charts their growing power. In the end, Morris-Crowther shows that Detroit's clubwomen pioneered new lobbying techniques like personal interviews, and used political education in savvy ways to bring politics to the community level. An appendix contains the 1926 Directory of the Detroit Federation of Women's Clubs.

Handbook of Research on Children's and Young Adult Literature


Author: Shelby Wolf,Karen Coats,Patricia A. Enciso,Christine Jenkins
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1136913572
Category: Education
Page: 568
View: 3900

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This landmark volume is the first to bring together leading scholarship on children’s and young adult literature from three intersecting disciplines: Education, English, and Library and Information Science. Distinguished by its multidisciplinary approach, it describes and analyzes the different aspects of literary reading, texts, and contexts to illuminate how the book is transformed within and across different academic figurations of reading and interpreting children’s literature. Part one considers perspectives on readers and reading literature in home, school, library, and community settings. Part two introduces analytic frames for studying young adult novels, picturebooks, indigenous literature, graphic novels, and other genres. Chapters include commentary on literary experiences and creative production from renowned authors and illustrators. Part three focuses on the social contexts of literary study, with chapters on censorship, awards, marketing, and literary museums. The singular contribution of this Handbook is to lay the groundwork for colleagues across disciplines to redraw the map of their separately figured worlds, thus to enlarge the scope of scholarship and dialogue as well as push ahead into uncharted territory.

The Joy Luck Club


Author: Amy Tan
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 014312949X
Category: Fiction
Page: 352
View: 2940

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In 1949, four Chinese women--drawn together by the shadow of their past--begin meeting in San Francisco to play mah jong, invest in stocks and "say" stories. They call their gathering the Joy Luck Club--and forge a relationship that binds them for more than three decades. A celebrated novel in the tradition of Alice Adams and Margaret Atwood from the bestselling author of The Kitchen God's Wife.

Daughters of the Dragon

A Comfort Woman's Story
Author: William Andrews
Publisher: Lake Union Publishing
ISBN: 9781503936263
Category:
Page: 351
View: 3066

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When twenty-year-old Anna Carlson travels from America to a Korean orphanage to locate her birth mother, she's devastated to learn the woman is already dead. But just when it seems her search is over, a stranger hands her a parcel containing an antique comb--and an address. That scrap of paper leads Anna to the Seoul apartment of the poor yet elegant Hong Jae-hee. Jae-hee recounts an epic tale that begins with the Japanese occupation of Korea and China during World War II, when more than two hundred thousand Korean women were forced to serve the soldiers as "comfort women." Jae-hee knows the story well--she was one of them. As Jae-hee's narrative unfolds, Anna discovers that the precious tortoiseshell comb, with its two-headed ivory dragon, has survived against all odds through generations of her family's women. And as its origins become clearer, Anna realizes that along with the comb, she inherits a legacy--of resilience and courage, love and redemption--beyond her wildest imagination.

Graphic Novels for Children and Young Adults

A Collection of Critical Essays
Author: Michelle Ann Abate,Gwen Athene Tarbox
Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi
ISBN: 1496811682
Category: Literary Criticism
Page: 372
View: 1104

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With contributions by: Eti Berland, Rebecca A. Brown, Christiane Buuck, Joanna C. Davis-McElligatt, Rachel Dean-Ruzicka, Karly Marie Grice, Mary Beth Hines, Krystal Howard, Aaron Kashtan, Michael L. Kersulov, Catherine Kyle, David E. Low, Anuja Madan, Meghann Meeusen, Rachel L. Rickard Rebellino, Rebecca Rupert, Cathy Ryan, Joe Sutliff Sanders, Joseph Michael Sommers, Marni Stanley, Gwen Athene Tarbox, Sarah Thaller, Annette Wannamaker, and Lance Weldy One of the most significant transformations in literature for children and young adults during the last twenty years has been the resurgence of comics. Educators and librarians extol the benefits of comics reading, and increasingly, children’s and YA comics and comics hybrids have won major prizes, including the Printz Award and the National Book Award. Despite the popularity and influence of children’s and YA graphic novels, the genre has not received adequate scholarly attention. Graphic Novels for Children and Young Adults is the first book to offer a critical examination of children’s and YA comics. The anthology is divided into five sections, structure and narration; transmedia; pedagogy; gender and sexuality; and identity, that reflect crucial issues and recurring topics in comics scholarship during the twenty-first century. The contributors are likewise drawn from a diverse array of disciplines—English, education, library science, and fine arts. Collectively, they analyze a variety of contemporary comics, including such highly popular series as Diary of a Wimpy Kid and Lumberjanes; Eisner award-winning graphic novels by Gene Luen Yang, Nate Powell, Mariko Tamaki, and Jillian Tamaki; as well as volumes frequently challenged for use in secondary classrooms, such as Raina Telgemeier’s Drama and Sherman Alexie’s The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian.

The First Wives Club


Author: Olivia Goldsmith
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1416562834
Category: Fiction
Page: 557
View: 6177

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A re-release of a best-selling tale features three New York society ex-wives--Elise, Brenda, and Annie--who band together to seek revenge on the husbands who discarded them for younger women. By the author of Marrying Mom. Reprint. 17,500 first printing.

Women Building History

Public Art at the 1893 Columbian Exposition
Author: Wanda M. Corn,Charlene G. Garfinkle,Annelise K. Madsen
Publisher: Univ of California Press
ISBN: 0520241118
Category: Art
Page: 265
View: 7404

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History of women during America's Gilded Age. Wanda M. Corn takes as her topic the grand neoclassical Woman's Building at the 1893 Columbian Exposition in Chicago, a structure celebrating modern woman's progress in education, arts, and sciences.

Convenient fictions

the construction of the daytime broadcast audience, 1927-1960
Author: Jennifer Hyland Wang
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: N.A
Category:
Page: 760
View: 4496

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The Dead Moms Club

A Memoir about Death, Grief, and Surviving the Mother of All Losses
Author: Kate Spencer
Publisher: Seal Press
ISBN: 1580056881
Category: Biography & Autobiography
Page: 288
View: 661

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Kate Spencer lost her mom to cancer when she was 27. In The Dead Moms Club, she walks readers through her experience of stumbling through grief and loss, and helps them to get through it, too. This isn't a weepy, sentimental story, but rather a frank, up-front look at what it means to go through gruesome grief and come out on the other side. An empathetic read, The Dead Moms Club covers how losing her mother changed nearly everything in her life: both men and women readers who have lost parents or experienced grief of this magnitude will be comforted and consoled. Spencer even concludes each chapter with a cheeky but useful tip for readers (like the "It's None of Your Business Card" to copy and hand out to nosy strangers asking about your passed loved one).

The Heroines Club

A Mother-Daughter Empowerment Circle
Author: Melia Keeton-Digby
Publisher: N.A
ISBN: 9781910559147
Category: History
Page: 260
View: 2819

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Offering nourishing guidance and a creative approach for mothers and daughters, 7+, to learn and grow together through the study of women's history. Each month focuses on a different heroine-including Frida Kahlo, Amelia Earhart, Anne Frank, Maya Angelou and Malala Yousafzai as strong role models to learn about, look up to, and be inspired by.

How to Be an American Housewife


Author: Margaret Dilloway
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 9781101189245
Category: Fiction
Page: 352
View: 4243

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A mother-daughter story about the strong pull of tradition, and the lure and cost of breaking free of it. When Shoko decided to marry an American GI and leave Japan, she had her parents' blessing, her brother's scorn, and a gift from her husband-a book on how to be a proper American housewife. As she crossed the ocean to America, Shoko also brought with her a secret she would need to keep her entire life... Half a century later, Shoko's plans to finally return to Japan and reconcile with her brother are derailed by illness. In her place, she sends her grown American daughter, Sue, a divorced single mother whose own life isn't what she hoped for. As Sue takes in Japan, with all its beauty and contradictions, she discovers another side to her mother and returns to America unexpectedly changed and irrevocably touched.